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Nostalgia4Dogges
Jun 18, 2004

Only emojis can express my pure, simple stupidity.



HS grades really donít matter if you do junior college. That said, if you test well, and being a veteran, your chances are much better than someone else going straight into a four-year. But, community college is always a good option.

Iíd consider both options, but the last post isnít a bad idea either. GI bill is a bit of a waste on community collegeóbut some folks do need the BAH. You can draw unemployment when you get out for about six months (state depending?)

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Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


cubivore posted:

Hi goons, I'm a lot closer to getting out so I'd like to ask some advice:

I'm looking to go to school once I'm out, for computer science or software engineering probably. But I did pretty badly in high school, like, my GPA was a 2.6, 2.7. Something like that.

Should I try to go to a community college first or will that be fine getting me into a school? I'm not trying to go to the Ivies here, but I don't know much anything about higher education.

As mentioned, a lot of schools will give you some wiggle room if you do well on your application and any kind of writing sample they want, due to military service. Basically, you're probably not the same lazy teenager you were, like many other people applying. In that regard, apply to whatever school you want. To take that point further, the worst thing that can happen is they say no...so don't apply to just one school if you're not sure how it'll turn out. There's no reason NOT to apply to a university or two that you're interested in AND a community college to cover your bases, except that it costs a few bucks to submit the paperwork. So it comes down to whether you're nervous enough to spend the $75 or so. I'd say you're probably fine, but maybe have a backup school.

Another consideration is what your educational goals are, or MIGHT be. If you're confident you're only getting a BS/BA, burn that GI Bill. If you might go back for a masters or beyond, especially if you're looking into career options where a grad degree (including MBA or similar) are common or helpful for promotion/resume writing, you might consider paying for a couple of semesters of community college out of pocket and saving some of the GI Bill for later. As long as the credits transfer to the school you intend to graduate from, nobody gives a poo poo or will ever even know. I wish I'd been smart enough to start at CC when I first started school, but I felt like there was some kind of stigma attached...I was wrong and paid a bunch of unnecessary money as a result.

Assuming you qualify for it at all, your GI Bill won't expire (unlike mine ). A year (which I assume is fall+spring semester, not including summer) averages about $3500 for community college. If you use the GI Bill later spending that now will save you a fuckton of money later, whether you use it on grad school or even just to finish this undergrad program at a full university. The trick is that you have to actually use it. For undergrad, if you start at the university right away and use the GI Bill, it may not cover the full duration of your program and you have to pick up the tab at the end, at full university price. If you spend a year (or whatever, you need to do that math and look at the calendar) at CC out of pocket, you can transfer to the university and fire up the GIB and ensure that you paid for the cheapest part and Uncle Sam is picking up the more expensive tuition through the rest of your schooling.

I've got a couple of years left before I need to start using what I've got left on mine, but it's been a challenge to find a program I'm interested in. But I'll be damned if I'm going to leave that much money on the table and let it expire.

Godholio fucked around with this message at 15:35 on Apr 5, 2021

rifles
Oct 8, 2007
is this thing working

cubivore posted:

Hi goons, I'm a lot closer to getting out so I'd like to ask some advice:

I'm looking to go to school once I'm out, for computer science or software engineering probably. But I did pretty badly in high school, like, my GPA was a 2.6, 2.7. Something like that.

Should I try to go to a community college first or will that be fine getting me into a school? I'm not trying to go to the Ivies here, but I don't know much anything about higher education.

Anecdotal but I applied to Ohio State with a 1.6 high school GPA and a 4-year-old 29 ACT composite. They let me in undeclared, but I couldn't afford living expenses. So, I applied to three other state schools (and got accepted into all of them), went for 3 semesters at the one closest to family so I had a place to stay, and knocked out most of my geneds and held a 4.0 starting their CS program. As soon as I got aid eligibility I reapplied to OSU, got accepted and transferred, and got into my CIS major 2 semesters later (some stuff didn't transfer, be careful of that.. if you have a school in mind, a lot of them partner with the local community college to provide better transfer of credit).

Schools want GI Bill money. Write in your application about your experiences and how you've matured from high school and that you're excited to be challenged as a mature student. If you have a lot of geneds to do still keep in mind that basically every big-school CS/CSE/CSEE program I've seen is packed-full and realistically are 5 year programs if you're starting with college algebra or below.. They're like 4 years if you start with calculus your first semester and are doing 16-18 CH every semester. You can CLEP a lot of stuff like that, but if you're not decided on what school you want then absolutely do junior college for those geneds; they'll be easier because of smaller class sizes and lecturers that give a poo poo.

Also, SIGN UP FOR FAFSA. DO IT. Regardless of your age your veteran status will allow you to be considered financially independent (no parent income if that's a factor for you). When it comes back and says you have a high EFC (based on your taxes where you were making AD money), file an adjustment request with whatever school you end up with. You will claim loss of wages because you came off active duty, and suddenly you'll get a full Pell grant + other state etc aid. If you do this right you'll be making legitimately pretty good money to go to school combined with your GI bill, you won't need to work or worry about paying rent or a car payment. Also find your school's scholarship application and figure out the dates and get that done asap. Generally they're made available in the early Spring for Fall semester. I did mine thinking I'd get nothing and got a scholarship that pays as much as a full Pell grant every semester.

LtCol J. Krusinski
May 7, 2013


Holy poo poo!

ďThe VaĒ posted:

Dear Student,

Effective April 1, 2021, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will no longer count the use of Veterans Readiness & Employment (VR&E) benefits (chapter 31) against the 48-month limit on GI Bill education benefits such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The use of GI Bill education benefits will continue to count against the 48-month limit on VR&E benefits.

VA has started to process impacted claims and enrollments with this update, and you will receive a notification letter outlining whether you have more GI Bill entitlement available.

If you have any questions due to this issue, please contact the Education Call Center at 1-888-442-4551, Monday Ė Friday, 7:00 a.m. Ė 6:00 p.m. Central Time. You can also find more information on our website at: https://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill


Respectfully,
Education Service

Thatís big news.

Flying_Crab
Apr 12, 2002





Interesting, my Post 9/11 months remaining never went down after I switched to Voc Rehab. Curious if that'll apply to me or if they'll retroactively dock my Post 9/11 for the VRE stuff whenever I get around to using it again.

McNally
Sep 12, 2007

Ask me about Proposition 305


Do you like muskets?


I'm starting the process for voc rehab and I have my my initial VRE appointment on the 29th. Any advice?

not caring here
Feb 22, 2012

blazemastah 2 dry 4 u

McNally posted:

I'm starting the process for voc rehab and I have my my initial VRE appointment on the 29th. Any advice?

Mine was a group thing where we watched a dumb poo poo video then met with the counsellor.

Have your paperwork together and you'll be done with that pretty quickly.

Most people will not have it done.

Grip it and rip it
Apr 28, 2020

Be the change you want see in the world


McNally posted:

I'm starting the process for voc rehab and I have my my initial VRE appointment on the 29th. Any advice?

It was pretty straight forward when I did it. My counselor had me get some job postings to show that what I was trying to do was viable.

Other than that it was just a bunch of filling out paperwork and discussion about what I needed to be successful. I ended up getting a laptop and a bunch of school supplies + an extension on my GI Bill time to cover all of lawschool

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berzerkmonkey
Jul 23, 2003


VA changed their systems, and I have to go in for a reval, even though my claim is still in the "Getting ready to mail" stage for the last month. Anyone know if this is a reset on existing claims, or if it's just an across the board "we want more info?"

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