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PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe



Let us take a walk down memory lane, before fast food; when families cooked every day, and refrigeration may have been optional.

Before supermarkets, and shrink-wrap.

Before PETA.





The recipes in this collection I found at a church rummage sale start out normal enough:





It's worth noting that, by 1950, the children of the Depression were starting their own households. Their parent's household grocery habits were largely established by limited options. Plus, folks just ate a little differently.



Then, it gets a bit weird (although, not to my mother, who was born in 1935, and has made or eaten all of these):



Talk about hearts and minds.

However, none of the following made it into my house growing up:



Times have surely changed.

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feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




You may enjoy http://www.lileks.com and his gallery of regrettable food!

Esme
Nov 4, 2009

hello i am your heart how nice to meet you



Is there, like, a recipe for this in the book? Or did everyone just know what Opossum Stuffing was back then?

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe



Ask and ye shall receive:

Cavenagh
Oct 9, 2007

Grrrrrrrrr.

Opposum liver isn't bloody optional. It's the whole point of the stuffing.

Illinois Smith
Nov 15, 2003

Ninety-one? There are ninety other "Tiger Drivers"? Do any involve actual tigers, or driving?


I have vague memories of my grandma making scrambled brains of some sort for breakfast and freaking four little kids the gently caress out.

Disco Salmon
Jun 19, 2004


Illinois Smith posted:

I have vague memories of my grandma making scrambled brains of some sort for breakfast and freaking four little kids the gently caress out.

Ugh...yes this! I remember being a little girl and having my grandma making Brains N'Eggs for breakfast served over toast. I refused to touch it. I can still see that glistening mess if I close my eyes and its been decades lol

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe



My parents would have calves' brains on toast and jealously guard it from us like it was the Hope Diamond. Somehow, they didn't notice my sisters & I turning green.

My wife says her father would do the same thing with head cheese: he'd buy it & go to elaborate lengths to hide it in the back of the refrigerator because he was sure others would plunder that gelatinous mass otherwise.

My mother actually did do the beef heart thing once (how the gently caress can you forget a trauma like that?) and did serve tongue as part of boiled dinner on numerous occasions...without slicing it down first. Yum.

Trauma of the Depression emerges in the weirdest ways

PainterofCrap fucked around with this message at Nov 25, 2015 around 20:24

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


PainterofCrap posted:

My mother actually did do the beef heart thing once (how the gently caress can you forget a trauma like that?) and did serve tongue as part of boiled dinner on numerous occasions...without slicing it down first. Yum.

My dad happily ate tongue and beef heart for years until he once did the grocery shopping for his mom. When he was 17. OH NO A THING I THINK IS GROSS BUT HAVE BEEN ENJOYING FOR YEARS. He refuses to eat it now. Which sucks now that I want to eat it. Both are fantastic in tacos.

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mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by R. Guyovich


I was just posting about old cookbooks in another thread. they are surely beautiful things.

I read recipes usually by digesting the title, then skimming the ingredient listings to figure out what's going on. I usually don't need to read the directions unless it's a really complex recipe.

It's really funny to do that with old recipes, because they all seem to have vastly simpler ingredient lists, and make no sense intuitively.

it's always fun to read a recipe like "ham baked in milk" with three ingredients - ham, mustard, brownsugar - and just go whattttt the gently caress could you do with those three ingredients - and then it's exactly what you think - covering ham with milk, adding some brown sugar and mustard, and then baking it for some inexplicable reason.

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