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Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



Kylaer posted:

In my opinion, "Give a man a weapon and he will use it. We know their weapons and therefore we know their limitations" is an absolutely classic line, and it has stuck with me ever since I first read this issue twenty-something years ago.

Where do you buy these official digital copies?

It's like, to me, Kwinn's final words how he wouldn't harm Dr. Venom as long as he lived, followed by "A grenade...fallen from a dead man's hand". That line is something that's stuck with me for thirty years now.

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Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



infrared35 posted:

One thing that stuck with me from the comics was a scene where a couple Joes (maybe Rock and Roll and Breaker?) stop at a gas station to fuel up and the kid working there is impressed with them and the equipment and he wants to know what he can do to sign up. The Joes basically tell him to get hosed, with one of them later saying to the other something to the effect of, "he just wanted to get out of his small-town dead-end job and that's not the kind of person we want" or some bullshit.

Nice recruiting pitch, assholes.

Didn't that "kid" turn out to be Zartan's brother Zandar? It was a ruse to see about getting into the Pit.

Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



Nipponophile posted:

I hope y'all will forgive a bit of a digression tonight. Who else remembers The 'Nam?

I do. I think I still have the first edition trade paperback.

Nipponophile posted:

At the time it was launched, Vietnam nostalgia was at a high. Movies like Platoon and Hamburger Hill were at the theaters and Tour of Duty was on TV. As comics go, it was fairly forgettable, which is a shame. The 'Nam launched with a high concept premise which didn't really translate to a comic publishing model.



So the idea was to have the comic move in real time. Each issue equals 30 days, and the run of seven years would cover the extent of the American involvement in the war. While the comic did reach 84 issues, the idea of moving in real time fell apart at some point, to the extent that the contemporary editor expressed some surprise that the title was being cancelled after issue #84. After the initial year or so of good buzz, The 'Nam dropped in circulation as the renewed interest in Vietnam waned and eventually comics entered the black hole of the '90s where nothing of quality escaped.

I really think it started falling apart after the initial writer Doug Murray left. After that, Marvel really had no idea what to do with it, such as including the Punisher in a few of them and trying to tie the comic to the Marvel universe.

Nipponophile posted:

Anyhow, despite it's failings, The 'Nam did a lot of neat stuff. The initial art direction stated that the characters themselves should be drawn in an exaggerated, caricature-like style. Notice the smooth lines and gentle angles on the newbie Ed Marks.



In contrast, equipment and weapons were drawn in a severely realistic style.



This is actually a trademark of Michael Golden. It works because the caricature allows him to express a lot of emotion and the contrast of the human characters and the hard lines of equipment make them more distinct from the rest of the art work. There's some wild panels in the 'Nam, like a dream sequence in the third issue with a sweeping AK. I was a bit disappointed that he only did the covers of G.I. Joe and never the interior artwork. There's a few of those that I still have to wonder how he did it, because they have a depth of field that is hard to do in illustration and, I assume, he was using animation cel sheets.

Although, looking at these panels, I wonder now if this would benefit from digital color remastering. It would make certain things come more alive, but I'd fear it would lose some of the abstractness, such as the orange and reds in that card-playing scene.

Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



Shithead Deluxe posted:

Nipponophile did you ever read Nth Man? I only got a couple issues, but it seemed kinda crazy in a good way.

The Nth Man is great although I'm thinking the problem is that it hasn't been collected in a trade paperback or, to my knowledge, released on the Marvel Unlimited online service. The only way to get it right now is either resort to :filez: or hunt down all the physical copies, including the "Marvel Presents..." short, and scan them if he wanted to cover them.

Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



Something just came to my memory, but I believe Doug Murray also wrote Mark Hazzard: MERC for Marvel's New Universe line. It concerned the life of an American professional mercenary and his family life, friends, and his jobs. It didn't last long, I think being cancelled before the first major New Universe event, the Pitt miniseries a.k.a. the explosion of Pittsburgh, since the main character wasn't superpowered. I would have to wonder if it's available online through Marvel at this point, since it's largely forgotten.

The thing I remember the most of it was the ending the main character is killed in the 13th issue or so by his ex-wife's new husband, who made a deal with the Iranians and double-crossed him. However, this isn't the last issue, since there's was the first and only annual issue of Merc, which dealt with Mark's comrades going to Afghanistan to help out the Mujaheddin fight against the Soviets. That issue ends with a random stranger receiving a message via a pigeon that the friends are now committed to this goal and are taking the fight to the Bear on their borders, with a single panel showing them overrunning a mechanized border unit, or die trying. It was such a nihilistic turn.

Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



Nebakenezzer posted:



e: This sorta percolated into the TV show, too. I remember one episode Cobra stages a telethon to collect money from criminal organizations around the world for a worthy cause (they stole the complete computer files of the FBI and were going to release them publicly if they raised a billion dollars.) I saw Destro in a tux and realized his face is identical to Mr.47 from the Hitman games. It was also a running joke on the show that Cobra minions are unionized, and I think at one point they reveal that Cobra has some sort of fraternity/sorority outreach program?

In the cartoon, Shipwreck at one point is going through a Cobra barracks and picks up some marketing material and realizes that Cobra has a better healthcare plan than the Joes do.

Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



Bulgaroctonus posted:

In the cartoon shipwreck also goes totally insane from some COBRA mind control scheme that I don't remember the specifics of, but watching it again as an adult (I'm 35 now, and this was maybe 12 years ago) it's pretty clear that they were alluding to DTs. At least that's how I viewed it.

I would suggest watching "The Prisoner" before rewatching that two-parter "No Place Like Springfield". Supposedly, the writer, Steve Gerber (who created Howard The Duck), based it heavily off that show, with the guys melting into plastic and smothering Shipwreck a direct reference to the Rovers capturing people.

Bulgaroctonus posted:

Anyway, I wasn't well to do and it was mainly Go-Bots and bits and pieces from other stuff. That said, and I'm sure a lot of y'all can agree, it was way more fun with a hodge-podge of stuff anyway (Han and Chewie flying a beat up snowspeeder into Castle Greyskull to blow up that weird fuzzy insect hand puppet thing and its rider that I got from a yard sale, but then Cy-Kill and Leader One swoop in and are somehow buds and then the giant cardboard base I made gets lit on fire because mom left her lighter out, but it's on the porch so gently caress it, now let's bust out fireworks!!!).

I'm convinced that stuff like Lego Dimensions and Disney Infinity was conceived by someone who mixed and matched difference brands lines and such. Amiibo might have done it first, but it's all Nintendo characters, at least with Infinity it's Disney meets Marvel meets Star Wars and Lego Dimensions it's a hodge-podge of everything Warner Bros puts out plus some exceptions like Doctor Who and the Simpsons. A bit with the same thing with Garry's Mod and SFM, where people just wait to rip models out of games to gently caress around with (and, considering the amount of SFM porn, literally). I wonder if it had to do with the over-commercialization of our childhoods, were we had all these competing brands and franchises vying for our attention, because I don't recall boomers doing that. It usually was just cowboys vs. Indians, space patrol, spies, soldiers, and the occasional rescue workers. I mean the closest I can think of is G.I. Joe running into Barbie. :cheeky:

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Young Freud
Nov 25, 2006



chairface posted:

In a too-bizarre-for-the-movie twist though, he did become a pro wrestler.

I couldn't believe this until I looked into it. He supposedly invented the "mandible claw" that Mankind used.

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