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Action Jesus
Jun 18, 2002



MazeOfTzeentch posted:



If it's not, it's dang close. brake is .93" OD before the threads, 1.075 at the back of the taper.

yeah my threads are .900 at their major diameter so the whole brake body is wider than even my threads. Looks like a far more shallow angle on the shoulder, but either way, super similar design principle!

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MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


Far as I can tell it locks up fantastically on my solvent trap proto-can. Gets you lots of friction between can and mount, shouldn't back off. I've unscrewed the direct thread adapter I have after torquing it decently onto the gun with a wrench a few times now.

Action Jesus
Jun 18, 2002



MazeOfTzeentch posted:

Far as I can tell it locks up fantastically on my solvent trap proto-can. Gets you lots of friction between can and mount, shouldn't back off. I've unscrewed the direct thread adapter I have after torquing it decently onto the gun with a wrench a few times now.

That's been my observation as well; the pictured brake is actually the 9th or 11th one I've made, the rest were prototypes in a different thread size/pitch. For the older design I'd made a blast shield for it as well and noted that while it took very little effort to thread the device on and tighten it, it took a lot more force to loosen it once the device had secured itself on the collar. Here's hoping!

Lathespin.gif
May 19, 2005


Pillbug

Did some shopping at the toy store this week



some big stainless, I did not get a quote for THE D



assorted pressure vessels of dubious origin? sign me the gently caress up!



if I only had a bigger lathe, oh MAN



oil and water hardening steel barstock



pulleys and gears and flanges, oh my





Doctor Grape Ape
Aug 26, 2005

Dammit Doc, I just bought this for you 3 months ago. Try and keep it around for a bit longer this time.


Lathespin.gif posted:

some big stainless, I did not get a quote for THE D



I'd love to see the lathe used to machine that tree trunk sized piece.

Miso Beno
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

Doctor Grape Ape posted:

I'd love to see the lathe used to machine that tree trunk sized piece.

Abom79 has you covered.

https://youtu.be/SMhbRPqwfa0

A Wizard of Goatse
Dec 14, 2014




this is rad but it's killing me that he never explains what the truck-sized, probably eight story fully extended hydraulic cylinder goes to

Doctor Grape Ape
Aug 26, 2005

Dammit Doc, I just bought this for you 3 months ago. Try and keep it around for a bit longer this time.


That is equal parts awesome and scary. The amount of energy that thing has is crazy and even though the center seems beefy enough to hold it in place if it somehow got loose, I'd still be scared to stand next to it when running.

Somebody Awful
Nov 27, 2011

Don't let Lowtax go down with the ship. Do your part for these dead gay forums.


Lathespin.gif posted:

Did some shopping at the toy store this week

Where is this magical place?

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Sperglord Actual posted:

Where is this magical place?

Lathespin.gif
May 19, 2005


Pillbug

About 25 miles south of SF, or a mile and a half from Imbert & Smithers

Lathespin.gif
May 19, 2005


Pillbug

I wanna give a shout out to one of my favorite tools in the shop for millwork, the Interapid .0005" DTI:

http://longislandindicator.com/p23.html



Smooth response, .06" total travel and just a really nice instrument to use.

Oh yeah, and the tail stem swivels nicely, so you can do this:



Just load the drill chuck you're probably gonna be using next anyway, pop the spindle into neutral, leave the Indicol in the drawer, and just sweep dat feature in.

Here we're swinging nearly 5" with just the chuck and DTI:



Yeah, we're a little overstretched from the perfect 12* contact angle, but it'll still get you within a thou or so, easy. For any feature from tiny out to about 4" or so you're golden, no extra steps. The indicol is still handy for quick checks without breaking setup and when you're fighting for headroom or need a larger sweep, but man can you save a lot of time on typical setups.

Buy one

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar


Quoting for truth.

Servicio en Espanol
Feb 5, 2009


Neither wood nor metalwork!

My computer broke yesterday so I decided to Do Something With My Life: make sweetheart grips for my el Colt 1911.



I had decided I wanted to give this a try a while back, but only got around to ordering the stuff recently. It was quite cheap, even factoring in some tools I bought for it that turned out to be either unnecessary or necessary but also useful in my life outside GunStuff. I went with a 12' X 12 piece of transparent Lexan a quarter-inch thick as my base material, and used my allegedly wooden Brownell's grips as models.



The weather was nice so I stripped 'er down outside.


My plan.


This picture is actually a lie. I did not actually use the dremel to cut the grips free, I used a scrollsaw but I didn't get any pictures of that process. Not that there is much to see, it is just a scrollsaw chewing plastic.


I could have done a better job, but I was out of practice. I deliberately gave myself extra room in all dimensions for fitting. A fair amount of sanding lay in my future.


I also didn't get the drilling process on camera. This was actually the most difficult part, because well I used a cordless drill and ended up just the slightest bit off. Apparently you are supposed to counterbore the holes for the screw bushings so the screwheads end up flush with the grips proper but I didn't do that. I solved the dimension problem by shaving away with a pocketknife for a minute or so and solved the screwhead flush-fit problem by not caring about that.


Everything fits, but the grips are not very comfortable yet.


Enter the dremel (for real this time.) Before and after sanding. I don't think I did this right, deciding to just bevel the grip edges with a cutting wheel, but well it is a learning experience and I wanted to see how I'd do freehand. Couple errant raindrops here too.


Ta-da! I forgot to put the screws in before taking this picture but trust me they fit and everything. They are more comfortable than they look, but I'll keep sanding here and there as the fancy takes me. I don't want to do anything to really obscure the viewing windows, so I doubt they'll ever be as comfortable as real grips. Still a fun way to waste a couple hours, and I took away some useful pointers for the future.

My computer died before I was able to print up some suitable pictures to put inside the grips for you, but I had a couple in mind

Target Practice
Aug 20, 2004

Shit.

Crossposting this from the Woodworking thread in DIY. Any insights or suggestions are very much appreciated. My brother and I used to work with wood a bit with our dad when we were younger, then for about 15 years or so switched to metal work almost exclusively. I'm ready to get back into wood, but I have a lot of learning to do.
-------------

I posted a couple hundred pages ago about a Shopsmith 10er that I got from CL for $20 bucks. I've pulled it all apart, got the headstock hotdipped to clean all the poo poo out of it, and have been spending the last few weeks cleaning what looks and feels like burnt caramel off of the quill, pinion, and everything else.

I think that this thing has been taken apart and cleaned once in the past 70 years, lubed completely incorrectly, then left outside to rot. The quill return spring was pretty much full of old, hard grease and wood shavings so that it wouldn't even turn. Everything is getting cleaned off and it's starting to look so pretty. I wish I was taking picutres, but I always get lost in the work and forget. Here's some that I just went out and took.

A poorly white-balanced picture of the night I brought it home. The motor that is on there is putting out 3/4 hp at 1750 rpm. Originally, it came with a 1/2 hp motor, so I'm going to be putting a new one on.


The state of the the tubes. This is pretty much what they look like over the whole thing. Well, looked like, because...


...I dug out my Makita angle grinder and threw a wire brush on it. It's making short work of the surface rust, but there's not much I can do now for the pitting. As you can see there, there are some dings where tools got dropped, probably gonna try and take any high spots off with a file. Any suggestions about what to coat these with? I'm thinking some type of wax would be great but I don't have any idea.


Here are the basic components of the drivetrain. In addition to these, there are 4 bearings that could barely even turn. Bonus shot of the 4x4 mallet with closet rod handle I made to remove the bearings. I can't stress how gross these were before I started. Like I said, imagine burnt caramel in color and consistency and you'll have an idea of what I was dealing with. For these, I'm thinking about lithium grease. I don't see any lube specs in the owners manual but lithium is pretty good for a lot of stuff.


A close up of the quill gears. These took about an hour to fully clean. WD-40 didn't really do anything, so I had to chisel the gunk out with dental picks. Super clean now.



I think that since I don't have any of the attachments like the table and jig saws, I'm just going to use this as my first lathe. I've always wanted to get into woodturning ever since I was a kid, when I watched my grandpa make my mom a huge rolling pin out of a hunk of oak. I've been doing some reading and I've watched a ton of videos and it seems like there are a ton of options for setting up a lathe. Different chucks, different screws, different centers, etc. I know that my tailstock has a #2 morse taper.

Does anyone have any experience with setting up something like this? It seems like a whole lot of information to take in as a novice, and I think I need a little help separating the wheat from the chaff.

MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


Just got babby's first end mill delivered and holy poo poo this thing is probably the sharpest tool I've ever owned. I'm gonna have to be very careful handling this thing.

MohawkSatan
Dec 20, 2008

by Cyrano4747


MazeOfTzeentch posted:

Just got babby's first end mill delivered and holy poo poo this thing is probably the sharpest tool I've ever owned. I'm gonna have to be very careful handling this thing.

Yeah, they're stupid sharp. Corncob roughing cutters are even worse for handling though.

Lathespin.gif
May 19, 2005


Pillbug

Servicio en Espanol posted:

Neither wood nor metalwork!

My computer broke yesterday so I decided to Do Something With My Life: make sweetheart grips for my el Colt 1911.



I had decided I wanted to give this a try a while back, but only got around to ordering the stuff recently. It was quite cheap, even factoring in some tools I bought for it that turned out to be either unnecessary or necessary but also useful in my life outside GunStuff. I went with a 12' X 12 piece of transparent Lexan a quarter-inch thick as my base material, and used my allegedly wooden Brownell's grips as models.



The weather was nice so I stripped 'er down outside.


My plan.


This picture is actually a lie. I did not actually use the dremel to cut the grips free, I used a scrollsaw but I didn't get any pictures of that process. Not that there is much to see, it is just a scrollsaw chewing plastic.


I could have done a better job, but I was out of practice. I deliberately gave myself extra room in all dimensions for fitting. A fair amount of sanding lay in my future.


I also didn't get the drilling process on camera. This was actually the most difficult part, because well I used a cordless drill and ended up just the slightest bit off. Apparently you are supposed to counterbore the holes for the screw bushings so the screwheads end up flush with the grips proper but I didn't do that. I solved the dimension problem by shaving away with a pocketknife for a minute or so and solved the screwhead flush-fit problem by not caring about that.


Everything fits, but the grips are not very comfortable yet.


Enter the dremel (for real this time.) Before and after sanding. I don't think I did this right, deciding to just bevel the grip edges with a cutting wheel, but well it is a learning experience and I wanted to see how I'd do freehand. Couple errant raindrops here too.


Ta-da! I forgot to put the screws in before taking this picture but trust me they fit and everything. They are more comfortable than they look, but I'll keep sanding here and there as the fancy takes me. I don't want to do anything to really obscure the viewing windows, so I doubt they'll ever be as comfortable as real grips. Still a fun way to waste a couple hours, and I took away some useful pointers for the future.

My computer died before I was able to print up some suitable pictures to put inside the grips for you, but I had a couple in mind



Neat gat. I'd probably start with drilling the screw holes in the sheet, get 'em spaced perfect as possible, then transfer the patterns onto that for cutout.

Get some cheap mags and dremel out the sides



e: belt sander! a belt would be magic for those edges compared to a dremel disc/drum:
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-in-x...nder-60543.html

don't use the HF belts though, get some 3m's or something decent from like 80 or 120, down thru maybe 220 or 400? wet sanding out 220/320/400/600/1k/2k, and maybe some polish and a rag will get you pretty optical if you wanna put that much elbow grease in

Lathespin.gif fucked around with this message at 07:14 on Mar 4, 2016

Lathespin.gif
May 19, 2005


Pillbug

Target Practice posted:

Shopsmith 10er that I got from CL for $20 bucks



The state of the the tubes. This is pretty much what they look like over the whole thing. Well, looked like, because...


...I dug out my Makita angle grinder and threw a wire brush on it. It's making short work of the surface rust, but there's not much I can do now for the pitting. As you can see there, there are some dings where tools got dropped, probably gonna try and take any high spots off with a file. Any suggestions about what to coat these with? I'm thinking some type of wax would be great but I don't have any idea.


Here are the basic components of the drivetrain. In addition to these, there are 4 bearings that could barely even turn. Bonus shot of the 4x4 mallet with closet rod handle I made to remove the bearings. I can't stress how gross these were before I started. Like I said, imagine burnt caramel in color and consistency and you'll have an idea of what I was dealing with. For these, I'm thinking about lithium grease. I don't see any lube specs in the owners manual but lithium is pretty good for a lot of stuff.


A close up of the quill gears. These took about an hour to fully clean. WD-40 didn't really do anything, so I had to chisel the gunk out with dental picks. Super clean now.


I think that since I don't have any of the attachments like the table and jig saws, I'm just going to use this as my first lathe. I've always wanted to get into woodturning ever since I was a kid, when I watched my grandpa make my mom a huge rolling pin out of a hunk of oak. I've been doing some reading and I've watched a ton of videos and it seems like there are a ton of options for setting up a lathe. Different chucks, different screws, different centers, etc. I know that my tailstock has a #2 morse taper.

Does anyone have any experience with setting up something like this? It seems like a whole lot of information to take in as a novice, and I think I need a little help separating the wheat from the chaff.

Coolness, my dad has an old shopsmith tablesaw/chopsaw thing I've never used, I hate tablesaws. I don't think it has the lathe attachment with it though!

Wool lathes aren't really my specialty but I've done a few file handles and a touch of metal spinning and such. A few things:

Since you don't really have a carriage that needs to travel super accurately or anything the ways don't need a perfect surface finish, a careful wire wheel finish should be fine to slide and clamp on. Don't use too coarse a wheel and try not to remove any metal with the rust, but don't worry about any pitting- low spots don't matter, as they don't touch anything. The roundness and diameter of the tubes are more important, carefully blend any nicks or high spots down to match the surface with a single cut file.

Purple power or foamy engine degreaser would be good, raw gas will eat old grease too but it's bad for the birds. Ed's Red is good stuff, ATF/acetone 50/50. naval jelly will derust stuff a bit too.

Normally I'd say just oil for a finish, but it does get gooey with sawdust. Maybe try turtle wax?

LOVE DAT HAMMER

Probably a good idea to try and identify/spec each bearing while ya have them out. Write it in the manual or something, maybe check prices on new, possibly sealed cartridges. There's a decent chance at least one of them is shot or will fail in a few hours of running, best to have a part number or spare on the shelf somewhere.

If the bearings feel and sound good after finish cleaning with something like acetone, white lithium or moly grease should be fine for these kinda loads/rpms. Don't mix greases.


As far as workholding goes, do you have a faceplate? I'd start with a screw-mount plate or three over a chuck, unless you're planning on needing one right away for pens or something. Woodscrew that sucker onto your tree slice, mount that up and go to town.

If you have a MT2 tailstock, fair bet you have a MT3 or MT4 headstock. How do the tapers look? Be careful with them, rust or gouges/scoring will prevent the tapers from seating/locking up properly. Worst case you can get a reamer to true 'em up, but be careful poking/scraping around in there.

I'd get an MT2 1/2" drill chuck, keyless is nice and cheap is fine. An MT2 live center, and maybe a cup center if you're feeling fancy. At least one dead center to fit your spindle/faceplate, they're cheap so get a tailstock one too for backup. Maybe a MT2-MT3 sleeve so you can run tailstock kit in the headstock, if that matches your spindle. Those pointy drive centers look neat but I haven't used one, maybe a cheap basic midsize one.

Good safety glasses and maybe a faceshield. No gloves or rings or sleeves or loose long hair please. be wary of the old school belts, fabbing a topguard would be good (and I won't tell anybody yer a wuss.)

Chisels/gouges: I don't know wood tooling, get a decent lil' set of HSS with long handles tho

You're gonna need a bench/pedestal grinder with a good aluminum oxide wheel and a dressing stick, they go dull pretty quickly.

Lathespin.gif
May 19, 2005


Pillbug

MazeOfTzeentch posted:

Just got babby's first end mill delivered and holy poo poo this thing is probably the sharpest tool I've ever owned. I'm gonna have to be very careful handling this thing.

MohawkSatan posted:

Yeah, they're stupid sharp. Corncob roughing cutters are even worse for handling though.

You got a 1/4" carbide, right? Get a nice 3/8" or 1/2" cobalt HSS from like Niagara or OSG and you won't even know where all this blood is coming from





e:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UYBDymDwxg

Lathespin.gif fucked around with this message at 09:25 on Mar 4, 2016

Uncle Caveman
Jun 16, 2006

I'm sorry, I can't hear you over the sound of how awesome I am.


Servicio en Espanol posted:

Sweetheart grips
Would 1/8" acrylic be too thin for 1911 grips? I have piles and piles of the stuff from past guitar pickguard projects.

Target Practice
Aug 20, 2004

Shit.

Lathespin.gif posted:

Whole lotta good stuff.

Thanks for all the great advice.

It's pretty much degreased, the worst part was the inside of the headstock, and the hot-dipping took care of that. $35 bucks to have someone else deal with that was a bargain.

The bearings seem like complete trash, but I figured that I'd just replace them with new ones if I plan to have this for any length of time. They are run of the mill Fafnir ones, I gave the model numbers to my brother who has a work connection with the local bearing supply place to see if he can get me a deal on them. If I have to mic them that's no problem, but we'll see. It's weird, they are literally the only part on the repair parts list that aren't listed. The assemblies they go in are listed, and you could buy the whole thing in 1948 but apparently they didn't stock the bearings.

I do not have a faceplate. I don't think I'm gonna need a chuck until I have leaned the basics. I think I'm gonna make a lot of rolling pins and spindle doodads.

As far as the headstock spindle goes, it doesn't have a taper, but rather it just ends in a 5/8" shaft with a flat machined into it. According to the owner's guide, all the headstock accessories would just use a setscrew into the flat to hold it. The only "accessory" that came with this thing is what seems to be the original table saw arbor. here's a half-assed exploded view:



So I'm guessing I need some sort of adapter to go from that to a screw-mount then. I'll do my research on the other stuff you listed, that will help a lot. A big part of research barriers is just not having the vocabulary. I can Google with the best of them for the most part but I just need to know what to look for.

As far as PPE goes, yeah I've got all of that, I wear polycarb glasses and doing safeties over that is a pain and (for me at least) really reduces what I can see, so I'm definitely going to get a faceshield. I really wish I could swing for a prescription set of safety glasses but the last time I shopped around for one it was gonna be like $600 bucks. Everything else is pretty standard tool safety stuff so I'll be good there too.

The tools are gonna be kind of a hurdle, but from what I can tell you only really need three or for to start with, and then specialize from there. I've got a bench grinder and stuff, I'll probably end up getting a dedicated sharpener at some point if I get really serious into it. Maybe convince dad to pitch in if I sharpen his drill bits .

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Lathespin.gif posted:

You got a 1/4" carbide, right? Get a nice 3/8" or 1/2" cobalt HSS from like Niagara or OSG and you won't even know where all this blood is coming from


pretty early on learning to machine I set a brand new 5/8" Cobalt long flute end mill down on a table.

It started to roll off.

knee jerk reflexed kick in and I grab it as it falls.


I *probably* should have had stitches in 3 fingers and my palm.

MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


Lathespin.gif posted:

You got a 1/4" carbide, right? Get a nice 3/8" or 1/2" cobalt HSS from like Niagara or OSG and you won't even know where all this blood is coming from

Yeah, 4-flute centercutting 1/4" carbide off amazon. I'm gonna be using it to clip baffles for my form 1 suppressor build. I'm gonna be doing the no-no of chucking it in a drill press, but it's pretty minor cutting so I should be okay, right?

Plan is to drill the 3/8" holes in all my formed freeze plugs, then using the mill either come in from the side or plunge straight down onto the angled part to cut small lobes coming out of the main hole, 2 on each baffle.

Would plunging onto the angle be a better idea or coming in from the side, given my right-tool-for-the-job deficiency?

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


MazeOfTzeentch posted:

Yeah, 4-flute centercutting 1/4" carbide off amazon. I'm gonna be using it to clip baffles for my form 1 suppressor build. I'm gonna be doing the no-no of chucking it in a drill press, but it's pretty minor cutting so I should be okay, right?
That's a maybe depending on the job. But worst case scenario you need a new drill press since you hosed the spindle. If we're talking auto freeze plugs I expect you'll be fine since they're not thick or going to be hard as gently caress steel. More likely the things will want to climb on the spiral flutes (you can get straight flute end mills if it ends up being a problem) so make sure they're secured good.

Plunging at an angle be the better choice if you've got a way to secure the plugs at an angle or tilt the press table.

Servicio en Espanol
Feb 5, 2009


Uncle Caveman posted:

Would 1/8" acrylic be too thin for 1911 grips? I have piles and piles of the stuff from past guitar pickguard projects.

Standard 1911 grips are around a quarter inch thick. I can't really speak to the whole "slim" grips but people act like you need special bushings for those so I will hazard to guess 1/8" is too thin. BUT there is absolutely nothing stopping you from stacking two 1/8" together to do this. It'd help a bit too, since you could stack the picture you intend to use between the two sheets.

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

MazeOfTzeentch posted:

Yeah, 4-flute centercutting 1/4" carbide off amazon. I'm gonna be using it to clip baffles for my form 1 suppressor build. I'm gonna be doing the no-no of chucking it in a drill press, but it's pretty minor cutting so I should be okay, right?

Plan is to drill the 3/8" holes in all my formed freeze plugs, then using the mill either come in from the side or plunge straight down onto the angled part to cut small lobes coming out of the main hole, 2 on each baffle.

Would plunging onto the angle be a better idea or coming in from the side, given my right-tool-for-the-job deficiency?

Plunge.

If you're putting side loads on your drill press the first thing to get hosed up is the chuck. Most chucks are only press fit together and the side load can loosen them / have them pop apart.

If you keep doing it the spindle bearings might get hosed.

MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


shalafi4 posted:

Plunge.

If you're putting side loads on your drill press the first thing to get hosed up is the chuck. Most chucks are only press fit together and the side load can loosen them / have them pop apart.

If you keep doing it the spindle bearings might get hosed.

Good to know, thanks. Going straight down onto the angled surface is okay?

Lathespin.gif
May 19, 2005


Pillbug

Cutters don't care about angles generated from tilting the spindle or work, as long as the work is clamped good and doesn't get pushed around. It just rotates your feed axis and alignment around, they'll still happily make chips.



Also, sounds like you probably don't actually need the centercutting feature on your EM, if you're plunging only partial diameters and not using the very center of the cutter- it's all about that web right in the middle.





Doesn't hurt to have it though!

Lathespin.gif fucked around with this message at 09:17 on Mar 5, 2016

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Relevant DIY thread -- Motronic is rehabing a poorly treated South Bend lathe from 1946.
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3767118

Got me checking on my local craigslist--there's one from loving 1915 listed that's loving huge, but I don't have the $500 (or a trailer) to get it with.

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


What sort of features should I be looking for in a band saw? Primary use is wood, but I'd like it to be capable of cutting knife blanks as well.

And don't worry, the cheapie bench top poo poo ain't happening.

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Parts Kit posted:

What sort of features should I be looking for in a band saw? Primary use is wood, but I'd like it to be capable of cutting knife blanks as well.

And don't worry, the cheapie bench top poo poo ain't happening.

Adjustable blade speed.


A lot of steels that you'd be making knives out of need to be cut between 150~300 SFM

Most woods need to be cut between 1200~3000 SFM



If you delve into things like D2 or S30V you need to get that blade down to ~50ish SFM

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Are old Craftsmans any good? There's a couple up for cheap and since the motor is outside the main housing I could always whip up a belt speed reduction deal, maybe even yank an existing one off of a drill press.

shalafi4
Feb 20, 2011

another medical bills avatar

Parts Kit posted:

Are old Craftsmans any good? There's a couple up for cheap and since the motor is outside the main housing I could always whip up a belt speed reduction deal, maybe even yank an existing one off of a drill press.

They're alright? IF you can get them going the right speed they should get the job done. Although getting fine toothed metalworking blades might be tricky in their size. (I've never really looked)

Pimp Drakula
Oct 12, 2013



I was helping clean out a friend's grandfather's house and he was apparently a machinist by trade and as a hobby. We took a look at his shop and I have the opportunity to make an offer on anything inside. Here are the three major pieces that were still in there (no lathe or mill unfortunately), are any of them worth the trouble of transporting approximately 45 minutes from the country to my garage? If so, what would be a fair offer on them?

(click to embiggen)

Central Machinery Bandsaw


Enco Drill Press


Delta/Rockwell/??? Drill Press

Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


Central Machinery is Harbor Freight, so pass on that.

A Wizard of Goatse
Dec 14, 2014



if you don't have a drill press that Delta probably won't be a bad one. I'd want to test it out and see what condition the insides were in before putting a number on it, like $75 wouldn't be out of order. pass if the chuck's hosed or anything up top's wobbly.

tbh if you've got the floorspace for a bandsaw and would ever use it I'd take that one too, an unsexy tool is better than no tool

A Wizard of Goatse fucked around with this message at 04:50 on Mar 15, 2016

Rhandhali
Sep 7, 2003

This is Free Trader Beowulf, calling anyone...

Grimey Drawer

I picked up an old hand crank bench grinder and cleaned it up, got the rust off and am about to degrease the innards and put a new wheel on it. White lithium should do the job I take it?

Miso Beno
Apr 29, 2004


Tryin' to catch me ridin' dirty


Fun Shoe

A Wizard of Goatse posted:

if you don't have a drill press that Delta probably won't be a bad one. I'd want to test it out and see what condition the insides were in before putting a number on it, like $75 wouldn't be out of order. pass if the chuck's hosed or anything up top's wobbly.

tbh if you've got the floorspace for a bandsaw and would ever use it I'd take that one too, an unsexy tool is better than no tool

This. HFT might be crap but if it's lasted this long with anything resembling regular use it's probably a serviceable tool. Also band saws are handy as hell. I use my portable Porter Cable band saw to make all of my unsquare cuts in metal.

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Parts Kit
Jun 9, 2006

durr
i have a hole in my head
durr


If the thing is free or at least way less than they sell at the stores for then sure why not, but I've spent way too much on HF tools over the years and am sick of them. poo poo I had two HF clamps break during light use over the weekend.

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