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Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.




Sampatrick posted:

So what you're telling me is that libertarians just believe in a Dragon master race? I guess that's more reasonable than whatever other belief system they might have!

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Bieeanshee
Aug 21, 2000

Not keen on keening.




Grimey Drawer

The kindred thing reads like someone shoehorning Pern into the game. Kindred bonded characters simply don't function at the same scale as dragons, so that thing where your main PC goes to bed for a few months or a year and you fart around playing an alt gets awkward real quick because all of your dragons are advancing at different rates.

Tying level ups to age makes the whole thing even more ridiculous. This is actually noted in the text.

Council of Wyrms is the first(?) but not the last setting to wrench the proficiency system into a precursor to 3E's feats. It's... interesting, as an attempt to keep some semblance of balance between creatures of potentially widely varying hit dice and special abilities, but in practice it's a kludgy mess.

One of the Ravenloft boxed sets, running with the conceit that gothic rocks fall, everyone dies, and then everyone gets back up as one sort of undead or another, used the same 'system'.

2E was not a very flexible system. That something like Council of Wyrms managed to get off the ground, and later merit a reprint (as a hardcover, rather than a full-blown box, mind) never ceases to amaze me.

Obligatum VII
May 5, 2014

Haunting you until no 8 arrives.

Horrible Lurkbeast posted:

This is the place to ask, do dragons ever marry dragons? my personal take is that even good dragons have too big of an ego to share.

I think I remember blue dragons actually forming family units and stuff. Petty, squabbling ones, but mostly functional?

Obligatum VII
May 5, 2014

Haunting you until no 8 arrives.

Nessus posted:

The dragons flew with desperate haste, but as they passed the great Sea or came from the eternal snows of Greenland; whether they came across the far East from the ancient realm of Zhongguo or from the sun-heated realms of the south, or from antipode's reversal, all faltered, all failed, landing in their fatigue or plummeting from the sky.

For Nixon had signed the Document, and Fiat Money ruled the day. With no intrinsic recognition of the value of pure-strain gold, dragons could only sleep, deathless and waiting, for the rise and return of gold-backed currencies - if not under Man, then under the Beetles that would succeed them.

Except the one dragon who, in their wisdom, chose to have a hoard comprised entirely of various magical items, which are always valuable on the basis of utility or at least novelty. Even if it WAS a lot less comfortable to sleep on, who's laughing now? Who's laughing at this giant pile of wands, swords, and decks of many things? No one, that's who.

Cythereal
Nov 8, 2009



Obligatum VII posted:

I think I remember blue dragons actually forming family units and stuff. Petty, squabbling ones, but mostly functional?

They do, IIRC, at least in the Draconomicon book which posited blues as the big Lawful Evil dragons - they're interested in building and running empires, and if you think you've seen an evil empire ruled by complex, literally cutthroat politics before, just wait till you see one run by blue dragon clans.

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


I just remember Green Dragons enjoying order, stability, and eating elfs.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

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Council of Wyrms: Sample Name - Squidkiller of Clan Deepwater

Dragon combat is mostly standard for 2e. Dragon THAC0 is that of a warrior of level equal to their HD, dragon-priests use priest THAC0, mages use wizard and psionicists use psion. Also, a dragon's HDs determine the effective plus of their claws for getting past damage immunities, with HD 4-5 being equivalent to +1 weapons, 6-7 +2, 8-9 +3 and 10+ +4. Now, tactics of the dragons!

Golds prefer to use Detect Lie and Detect Gems before combat starts, for...some reason, then use their Bless and luck bonus powers to buff themselves. They heavily use magic in combat. They can either breath a 90 foot cone of fire or a 50 foot cloud of chlorine gas. Silvers will use their feather fall powers to stop projectiles and wall of fog or control weather to confuse foes before moving in. If very angry, they may use reverse gravity to fling foes into the air, while against aerial foes they will create and hide in clouds to ambush from. They can breath a cone of cold or a cloud of a paralyzing gas. Bronzes will prefer to bribe foes or use their repulsion breath to get rid of them before a fight, and often rely on ESP powers to learn the intentions of potential enemies. In a fight, they use wall of fog to blind a foe before charging in, and underwater, they use airy water powers to ensure their breath remains useful. They can either breath lightning bolts or a cloud of repulsion gas that forces enemies away.

Coppers like to tease and taunt their foes into mistakes, and will often use terrain to get out of enemy reach. They jump around a lot and often transmute rocks to mud and kick enemies into the mud. There, they either crush with walls of stone or grab enemies and fly into the air. Against aerial foes, they like to draw enemies into narrow areas and use their spider climb powers to maneuver while the enemy crashes into walls. They can either breathe a cloud of slow gas or a blast of acid. Brasses avoid combat when possible, and will make dust clouds and control wind to disorient foes before charging or grabbing. They also use their temperature control abilities to make foes uncomfortable, and the younger ones will flee if really in danger. They can breathe either sleep gas or a heat blast. Amethysts will attack first with their breath, then rely on psionics and magic. They refuse to ever hide or ambush, but will run if faced with death. Their 'breath' is actually them vomiting up a crystal lozenge that explodes with concussive force that can knock people out.

Sapphires begin combat with breath weapon, then move to spells and physical attacks, using its psionics and special powers to escape if overpowered. Their breath is a nearly inaudible supersonic blast that both hurts people and causes fear. Emeralds like to attack from ambush, using breath and claws to disable as many foes as possible but retreating if in real danger. Their breath is a stunning sonic blast. Topazes start with their psionics, then spells and innate powers, saving their breath and physical attacks until they get hurt. They will happily retreat or surrender falsely, using the chance to build to a hit-and-run ambush before actually fleeing. They breathe a magical strength-draining dehydration blast. Crystals use their charm person powers to avoid fights, and will use their breath to disorient foes, following up with spells and innate powers. They use physical attacks only as a last resort. Their breath is a cone of glowing shards that blind and cut.

Reds prefer to attack physically so as to leave treasure intact, and use their breath and other powers only against obviously powerful foes. They breathe fire. Blues prefer to attack with breath from a distance, to reduce risk to themselves. They then attack from above, using innate powers as needed. They have a lightning breath. Greens love fighting and stalk prey before they attack. Against a tough foe, they use their breath and then a combo of spells and powers. Against weak foes, they challenge quickly and rely only physical attacks, to keep the fight going as long as possible. They breathe clouds of poisonous chlorine. Blacks attack from ambush, using their special powers first, then breath, then claws and teeth. Their breath is an acid blast. Whites start with breath and powers, then charge into melee. They breath a cone of frost.

While most dragon disputes are handled diplomatically, the Council allows formal challenges - the Challenge of Claw and Wing. In a formal duel, two dragons meet at the Council Aerie, and must remain airborne the whole fight. The first to land for any reason is the loser, and the only weapons allowed are wings, claws and innate abilities - no breath weapons, spells or psionics. Anyone that breaks the rules loses. Note that any flying creature that hits half HP must land ASAP, and at 20% HP you can't even glide and just fall out of the sky. Due to the rules, these fights are rarely lethal - more often, someone hits half HP and is forced to land.

Next time: Book Two.

Dareon
Apr 6, 2009


Regarding the Draconomicon cover and the horse, there's a simpler explanation. Look at the shield in the lower right corner. That's Tordek's shield, so it's probably his horse. :smaug:

Also it might be kind of interesting to compare and contrast the rules in Draconomicon to Council of Wyrms.

Also also, I've always thought amethyst dragons horking exploding crystals at foes was the weirdest breath weapon.

Doresh
Jan 7, 2015


Dareon posted:

Also also, I've always thought amethyst dragons horking exploding crystals at foes was the weirdest breath weapon.

But it would make for an awesome Monster Hunter enemy.

And how about a "Dragon of Holding" who can vomit out just about anything you can think of?

Obligatum VII
May 5, 2014

Haunting you until no 8 arrives.

Cythereal posted:

They do, IIRC, at least in the Draconomicon book which posited blues as the big Lawful Evil dragons - they're interested in building and running empires, and if you think you've seen an evil empire ruled by complex, literally cutthroat politics before, just wait till you see one run by blue dragon clans.

To be fair, it's probably fairly safe for their subjects. Remember, they consider the people in their domain their possessions, eg. you are are part of their hoard. Dragons defend their hoards pretty ferociously. Likewise, while the dragon may often make difficult demands, they are unlikely to demand you ever do something blatantly suicidal.

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


It's like how Drakkenhall was the coolest place to live in 13th Age.

Though that has more to do with how bland everywhere else is so someplace with a hook (ruled by a brilliant but possibly evil scholarly primordial dragon who is technically an Imperial Dux, inhabited by all the monsters and rejects of the more boring places of the setting) stood out so much.

Bieeanshee
Aug 21, 2000

Not keen on keening.




Grimey Drawer

Dareon posted:

Regarding the Draconomicon cover and the horse, there's a simpler explanation. Look at the shield in the lower right corner. That's Tordek's shield, so it's probably his horse. :smaug:

Also it might be kind of interesting to compare and contrast the rules in Draconomicon to Council of Wyrms.

Also also, I've always thought amethyst dragons horking exploding crystals at foes was the weirdest breath weapon.

Dark Sun dragons breathed a cone of searing sand, which always made me wonder where they kept it all.

Kurieg
Jul 19, 2012

RIP Lutri: 5/19/20-4/2/20
:blizz::gamefreak:


One of the later monster manuals had this thing called "The Great Game" which was basically what dragons did when they got bored, sacrificing some of their magical power and hoard to get marginal additional benefits but getting to stroke their ego when they manage to out-wit one another even with such a handicap.

And then there's basically the entirety of Argonessen in Eberron, which is basically "Dragons loving with each other cuz they can."

Dareon posted:

Regarding the Draconomicon cover and the horse, there's a simpler explanation. Look at the shield in the lower right corner. That's Tordek's shield, so it's probably his horse. :smaug:

Also it might be kind of interesting to compare and contrast the rules in Draconomicon to Council of Wyrms.

Also also, I've always thought amethyst dragons horking exploding crystals at foes was the weirdest breath weapon.

Cataclysm dragons are made out of lava and their breath weapon is a combination fire/sonic cone.


Also I think it's weird that with all the magical crossbreeding that dragons can do, they never pulled the trigger on, say, a SIlver/Gold crossbreed.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

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I have good news for you about the upcoming book, then.

Doresh
Jan 7, 2015


I'm waiting for a Universe Dragon who hits you with the concept of Entropy. Or a Glitch Dragon who can't use his breath weapon because it would break the multiverse.

Or how about a Funnel Dragon who barfs up smaller dragons?

Doresh fucked around with this message at 15:13 on Apr 18, 2017

Dareon
Apr 6, 2009


Kurieg posted:

One of the later monster manuals had this thing called "The Great Game" which was basically what dragons did when they got bored, sacrificing some of their magical power and hoard to get marginal additional benefits but getting to stroke their ego when they manage to out-wit one another even with such a handicap.

Xorvintaal, yeah. I've got a note in my ideas file about a Xorvintaal dragon with levels in Death's Chosen, which essentially turns them into a Renfield. The xorvintaal dragons had the ability to designate characters as, like, pawns in their games for minor benefits. I think I was picturing the dragon making his undead master a xorvintaal pawn so they had this symbiotic feedback loop going on.

SirPhoebos
Dec 10, 2007

Horned Rat-Sempai Noticed Me! :swoon:


Kurieg posted:

Also I think it's weird that with all the magical crossbreeding that dragons can do, they never pulled the trigger on, say, a SIlver/Gold crossbreed.

I remember one Dragon Magazine from 2nd Edition had an article on cross-breeds. Purple Dragons were red-blue crosses that breathed out Diablo's stream attack.

Probably the worst breath weapon was either Shadow or Deep Dragon, because one of them had an energy drain breath weapon :supaburn:

Doresh
Jan 7, 2015


SirPhoebos posted:

Probably the worst breath weapon was either Shadow or Deep Dragon, because one of them had an energy drain breath weapon :supaburn:
Pathfinder (and probably 3.X) had some kind of negative energy dragon who attacks you with negative energy that's so hardcore that it doesn't heal undead.


(Though I seem to recall that it says nothing about whether or not it actually hurts them instead...)

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Doresh posted:

Pathfinder (and probably 3.X) had some kind of negative energy dragon who attacks you with negative energy that's so hardcore that it doesn't heal undead.


(Though I seem to recall that it says nothing about whether or not it actually hurts them instead...)

It's been clarified to say it does (though you're right in that it doesn't make that explicit in the base rules), which makes sense given that umbral dragons eat ghosts.

Barudak
May 7, 2007



I prefer Cold Stone Dragons and their breath attack Cone of Beer.

They, do, unfortunately have the lowest perception scores of all true dragons so while dangerous as hell when enraged theyre pretty easy to trick.

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.




They don't breathe ice cream?

Barudak
May 7, 2007



Halloween Jack posted:

They don't breathe ice cream?

No, those were hunted to extinction as they were easily identified and tracked due to their lethargy and loud singing.

Doresh
Jan 7, 2015


Prism posted:

It's been clarified to say it does (though you're right in that it doesn't make that explicit in the base rules), which makes sense given that umbral dragons eat ghosts.

But how cool would it be for a Lich or regular necromancer to ride around on a dragon who can both kill his enemies and keep his minions patched up with a single action?

MonsieurChoc
Oct 12, 2013

Every species can smell its own extinction.


I always liked the idea of the Plutonium Dragon.

Prism
Dec 22, 2007

yospos


Doresh posted:

But how cool would it be for a Lich or regular necromancer to ride around on a dragon who can both kill his enemies and keep his minions patched up with a single action?

The fluff section of the umbral dragon entry actually says they do that, but the rules don't let them.

Pathfinder!

Doresh
Jan 7, 2015


Prism posted:

The ecology section of the umbral dragon entry actually says they do that, but the rules don't let them.

Pathfinder!

Surely this must be the works of the vile god Nerf.

theironjef
Aug 11, 2009

The archmage of unexpected stinks.



Kurieg posted:

Also I think it's weird that with all the magical crossbreeding that dragons can do, they never pulled the trigger on, say, a SIlver/Gold crossbreed.

It was only because the name was already taken.

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.




Kurieg posted:

Also I think it's weird that with all the magical crossbreeding that dragons can do, they never pulled the trigger on, say, a SIlver/Gold crossbreed.
That gives you a White Gold Dragon which is just confusing.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

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Council of Wyrms: lovely Image Quality Brought To You By Internet Restrictions



The Io's Blood islands are far from any human lands, located deep in the oceans and crossing from the northern Ice Sea through the Coral and Blood Seas, and on to the southern Burning Sea. All islands within the chain are ruled by dragons, who have a myth about their creation. See, the whole of the world was made by the great Io, the Ninefold Dragon, the Swallower of Shades, Great Emerald Wheel, the Concordant Dragon and Sire of All Creation. Dragons were his first and favorite children, but when he turned his attention to the world he had made, he found that despite all he had given them as natural gifts, they were not ruling over the world in harmony. Instead, they warred with each other incessantly. And so, Io came forth to his children to end the Dragon War, declaring: "If any dragon's blood should be spilt, let it be mine and mine alone!" And so he sliced his own belly, and let his fiery blood drop into the sea. Its power set the Ice Sea steaming, seperated the Blood and Coral Seas and set the Burning Sea alight. As the blood cooled, it formed islands, and Io sent dreams to the great sages of the dragons, urging each to lead their people to the islands formed by his holy blood, to live in true harmony as was the birthright of Io's finest children.

Once the migrations began, the Concordant Dragon left. He would not force his children to follow his dream, but he could not bear to watch if they failed. And so, Io traveled to other worlds, watching them for a time to keep from knowing if his children failed. Eventually, however, he returned - and while he found that his islands were inhabited by dragons, they were not at peace. Instead, they killed each other. Again he sought to guide them by dreams, but the Dragon War was so terrible that even these were ignored. Thus, he had but one option: to send his avatar, an immense great wyrm. Even this avatar could not end the war...so Io came up with a new plan. He declared too his children: "If you want a war, I will give you war." And so Io went beyond the Blood Sea, finding a perfect enemy: the human tribes, who hated and feared the dragons but had far greater numbers. Io's avatar appeared to the humans, who thought it a god. He inspired them to fight the dragons, teaching the humans where to strike and how to fight that they might slay even a great wyrm, teaching them to make armor and weapons and great ships.

The dragons were utterly unprepared. They had fought the fire and frost giants before, but never anything like the massive fleets the humans sent, nor the dragon slayers that rode them. They didn't even notice the invasion at first, not fearing the small creatures that came on the ships. Not until the systematic murder of dragons began. The disorganized dragons were on the verge of destruction by the dragon slayers, but Io sent his avatar to three dragons - Exaurdon the Gold, Starratiel the Amethyst and Bloodtide the Red, who listened to the words of the Ninefold Dragon: "No one dragon clan can stop this horde, but together, unified as the many forms of Io himself, you can." And so the three united the dragons, making a great plan. Together, the dragons of the islands drove away the humans, killing the dragon slayers and destroying their ships. Individually, they could not defeat the army of slayers, but together, they could cover each other and slaughter the humans. Io rejoiced in their victory, certain now that his children would live in harmony...but again, he was wrong. With the humans gone, the dragons turned once more to internal warfare. Io was furious. Once more, Io sent visions to his three prophets. Exaurdon was shown a great aerie on a golden plain, where all dragons might gather. Bloodtide foresaw great, formal challenges to replace the murderous dragon wars. Starratiel dreamed of a great council to mediate between dragon clans. They came together once more, and so the Council of Wyrms was born.

The Io's Blood chain is over 60 islands, with many different climates. The closest land masses are to the far north and far south, the lands of the frost giants and fire giants respectively. The dragons know little of these lands, and even less about the others, in the far reaches of the world. They know of small, desolate islands, but those have very little in the way of inhabitants. In practical terms, the Io's Blood is essentially a world of its own, broken into three parts - the north, center and south. The northern islands' three largest are Everwinter, Barren Isle and Glacianta. These are cold, arctic islands, home to the white, amethyst and crystal dragon clans. In the far north, the blindingly white lands make daytime travel hard, as even the smallest bit of sunlight makes the ice a dazzling, blinding display, and by night, few places are as cold and black. The islands are home to many monsters - behirs, basilisks, remorhazes, ogres, kobolds, orcs and trolls. Dwarves and gnomes also live there, primarily as dragon vassals, and a few primitive human tribes survive, descendants of the ancient dragon slayers. Occasional frost giants wander the area in search of dragons to capture and enslave, to bring north to their homeland.

The temperate islands in the center are bordered by the Blood Sea in the east and the Coral Sea in the west. The largest isles are Exaurdon, Starshine, Jade and Emerald, as well as the Council Aerie on All Clans Island. There is also the important island of Fang, where young dragons are sent to test their skills against the wild beasts. The temperate area follows a regular seasonal cycle with abrupt switches between seasons, becoming warm and hot, then cold and frozen in turn.

The sputhern region is a hot, dry set of islands that move into tropical ones as you head further south. The desert islands include Rockshore, Aridia and Inferno, as well as the important (but small) Wizard's Isle, where dragons that seek to understand the arcane secrets of the world are taught. There is also the Forbidden Island, of which no elder will speak and from which no young dragon returns. The coppers, brass and blues command these lands. The jungles to the south begin on Bloodtide, and the other major islands include Fireshore, Flamestrike, Storm, Lightning and Oracle islands. These are home to black, red, emerald and silver clans, along with the underground sapphires, plus all kinds of monstrous prey, from yuan-ti to goblins to lizardmen to humans to the rare fire giant.

The gold dragons are divided into the clans Exaurdon, Justice, Resplendence, Sunblaze and Triumph. The silver dragons have clans Brightscale, Cloudwalker, Coldwing, Fog, Pinnacle and Summit. The bronze have clans Battlewing, Cliffwalker, Seaview, Tempest and Waveflier. The coppers have Becubard, Clawstrike, Cutharn, Fastwing, Highjump, Rockclaw, Stoneproud and Sunleap. The brass clans are Blisterclaw, Dewfeast, Drywing, Dustspinner, Hotwind, Sandtail and Sungazer. Several of the clans receive information in the book, while the GM is left to make up histories for the rest.

Clan Exaurdon is the largest, eldest and most respected gold dragon clan. It rules most of Exaurdon Isle, from the north forests to the central plains. It has two major cities - the City of Gold which overlooks All Clans Isle and is built largely of gold-plated buildings, and the city of Summer in the west, where the elves study magic and lore, and grow the city itself from living wood. Clan Exaurdon is believes strongly in freedom and grants more independence to its vassals than any other clan. It is a clan focused on learning and art, with vassals allowed to pursue their own interests and better themselves, as long as they serve and work in harmony with the dragons. The clan is led by the great wyrm Magnern the Gold, whose lair is deep beneath the City of Gold and whose hoard is believed to fill a chamber half the size of the city itself. He is far more concerned with ruling the island than anything else, leaving the clan's council seat to his daughter and lord advocate Aureen. His current kindred is the elf mage Luniel Sarrenth, who oversees day to day life in Exaurdon and who speaks for his master most of the time. While no clan is openly its enemy, most other clans are deeply envious of the wealth of Clan Exaurdon. Clan Resplendence in particular believes they are better suited to be the leading gold dragon clan and oppose Exaurdon in debate frequently. Firebrand the Red, leader of Clan Bloodtide, despises Magnern personally and so actively opposes Clan Exaurdon in council at every turn, always plotting ways to take the clan down. While he has never carried out any of these plans, Firebrand's hatred and jealousy are growing.

Next time: Clans Sunblaze, Cloudwalker, Pinnacle and Tempest.

wiegieman
Apr 22, 2010

Royalty is a continuous cutting motion




Those dragons deserved a genociding for those awful, awful names.

Kurieg
Jul 19, 2012

RIP Lutri: 5/19/20-4/2/20
:blizz::gamefreak:


Mors Rattus posted:

Clan Exaurdon

???

ex-Zordon

hyphz
Aug 5, 2003




Hey, it's another bit of a work break, so let's do another game. This time, one I think that I really like, but that I've never been quite certain about. Certainly, I'd put a positive spin on this one.

108 shades of Fey: Costume Fairy Adventures

Once upon a time, there was a game called Maid. Which was largely intended to be a light-hearted anime game about characters causing chaos, but which mostly become infamous for the risque content it included, some of which was by accident. This game also included, as an optional rule, a "costume table" which allowed a Maid character to roll to change into a random costume and gain bonuses vaguely related to what the costume represented. A gamer and RPGnetter called David Prokopetz apparently liked this aspect of the game, and wrote a cross-over parody called Eclipse Maid, which replaced the costume table from Maid with a set of morphs from Eclipse Phase - basically entirely new bodies or even body-transcending forms - in an equally silly way. (But, um, yea, it still had Pleasure Model as one of the rollable morphs.)

Costume Fairy Adventures is Prokopetz's second attempt at tweaking the same formula, but with much more dramatic changes. All of the risque or suggestive stuff, pleasure models or whatever, has been stripped out; the dice system has been overhauled; the costume system integrated into the core rules, and a great deal more structure has been added to play. The system is a strange combination of influences from sources such as Fate, Wushu, Toon, and the structure makes it almost a hybrid between a traditional RPG and a storytelling parlor game like Once Upon a Time. And that's why I like it - it's a really interesting experiment in structuring a sandbox game.

One odd thing about this book - while the rules are actually pretty simple, the book explains everything, from some standard GMing tips to social basics (like how to put out snacks for tabletop play or how to organize a game over chat or e-mail). While I get the idea that they want this game to appeal to the non-traditional RPG audience, at the same time, all that does take up quite a bit of space. The book is folio-sized, but is thicker than the similar folio-sized Fate Core, and much thicker than the older, also folio-sized, Faerie's Tale Deluxe which likewise was written for newer players and children. It's thicker than the two rules books in the new Paranoia Red Clearance set combined. It's kind of cheating, but it's also thicker than the D&D 5e Player's Handbook! (cheating because 5e is letter-sized) So it's not clear if the sheer volume of the book will itself put off the same new players that it's written to appeal to. Still, this is probably justified in that the majority of sales are probably expected to be PDF.

Also, there's a list of "influences" at the start, but there's no mention of Maid or Eclipse Phase - only of Golden Sky Stories and Fate Accelerated, which it does definitely have connections to, but still..

So. Your character. You're a fairy. All the classic tropes, foot-tall humans with wings and magic powers who are also, by and large, incredibly ditzy. Their goal in life is to cause entertaining chaos, but "almost never" causing serious harm, and sometimes helping people indirectly. Ignatius J. Reilly would be proud. Step one in making your character is to pick one of six Kinds, or you can roll if you prefer. And the Kinds to choose from are:

Fairy. The... wait, what? Oh, good grief. Yes, for some reason, in this game where everyone plays fairies, the very first kind in the book is called Fairy. And no, it's not the universal or default one. There's actually one particular kind of fairy called a Fairy. This is even worse than No Thank You Evil having a specific kind of child character called a Kid. I have no idea why on Earth they would do this. It's not like there's a shortage of general names for classic looking fairies. The book states that it uses "fairy" to mean any player character, and "Fairy" to mean the specific kind. I'm going to copy that tradition, except I'll use "fairy" for any player character, and "Fairy (head-desk)" for the Kind.

Fairy (head-desk). They're called that because they're the archetype of how most humans picture fairies. Foot tall, translucent wings, and ridiculously cunning and spry. The advantage of being a Fairy (head-desk) is that you have the most impressive wings of any Kind; you get Edge (basically a positive modifier) in any kind of mobility contest.

Pixie. Pixies are a bit bigger, more muscular, less child-like, and they have a beetle's shell protecting their wings. People immediately expect them to be troublemaking rowdies. They can fly, but not as well as Fairies (head-desk), so they don't get an Edge. Their bonus is that their Stress Limit (basically HP) is increased by 5 compared to everyone else.

Sprite. Sprites are even more slight looking than Fairies (head-desk), but tend to associate more with healthy plants, blooming flowers, bright colours, and so on. They look like complete ditzes who could maybe manage to work out where a field was and dance in it, and that's it. They can fly with no advantages, but their bonus is that they're really lucky - or, actually, they're just really good at using magic, but most fairies don't understand when they're using magic and just put it down to luck. They generate one extra Magic point whenever they generate them from a roll.

Brownie. Aha! One that actually matches folklore. Short, chubby, and earthy-coloured, and generally seen as helpers by the Big Folk, which can be pretty beneficial. They have the same neutral flight as Pixies, and their power is that.. they can change Costumes more easily, because they don't have to dress up completely, just accessorize differently. Huh. It doesn't really fit. I guess the idea that they should get on better with Big Folk wouldn't make a good power because it would be ruined if they interacted with anyone else, but still.

Goblins actually look a bit like Fairies (head-desk) except they don't have wings, at all. They do, however, have scary glowing eyes, small claws, and nasty pointy teeth. They're not actually any more evil or scary than any other kind of fairy, but they get a terrible reputation. Goblins can't fly, but they're super agile instead - scuttling up walls, over ceilings, squeezing through gaps, and doing huge jumps. Their power is that they can substitute any of their senses for any other sense, meaning they're great at hiding in dark rooms and similar, and they can't be surprised.

Elves are the rulers of all fairies. Well, they say they are. Most fairies are just humoring them and think they're a bunch of stuck-up idiots. They're a full inch taller than most other fairies, tend to have metallic coloured eyes and hair, and have no wings. They can't fly, but they can walk on air as though it were solid, leaving little puffs of sparkles and ringing bells behind. They have a power actually called "Protagonist Syndrome" - in that it's difficult to upstage them or make them look bad. What this means is that they effectively cancel out 1 point of Edge any opponent has against them.

Next steps is Stats - or, as this game calls them, Facets. Regular stats don't make a whole lot of sense for fairies - none of them are stronger than a small child and none of them are particularly smart. So instead, the five Facets represent aspects of personality and attitude - essentially, they're more like the Approaches from Fate Accelerated. Their scores range from 1 to 6, and you assign stats to them based on a standard array given in the book. Well, if you want to play properly you do. You do get the option of rolling them up as well. Unfortunately, having tested this with a quick Python script, the roll rules are exactly the opposite of what you'd want: they have a very high chance of giving you a better result than the standard array, but an only slightly lower chance of giving you worse. So some players are going to be rolling in the hay and some are going to be miserable for the whole game - almost the same problem as the 5e points buy.

The five Facets are: Moxie for being bold, brave, belligerent or just too stupid to realize you're in trouble; Focus for fine detailed work with attention to detail; Craft for complex or cunning or misdirected schemes, or complex mechanisms; Grace for avoiding screwing up both socially and physically; and Shine for just being dang lucky - either than or being really brilliant at fairy magic, and no fairy can tell which.

Next step is to pick two Quirks, one based on your highest Facet and one on your Lowest. These are basically Fate Aspects. They're freeform and give you bonuses on rolls they come up on. There's no particular rules about how they have to be associated with Facets, other than that which Facet they're associated with and its value can provide some interpretation of the Quirk. The book provides a whole bunch of sample Quirks, but none of them have any custom rules; they're just general descriptors.

You can draw a picture of your fairy if you want to. You also need to write down their Stress Limit (which is their hit point total), which is 15 if you're a Pixie and 10 if you're anything else. And you're done!

But what about the other half? What about the Costumes? Well, that's where things get unusual. Costumes aren't part of a character; they're randomly handed out at the start of each game. By default, they're printed on cards. The game comes with a deck of 108 costume cards, and each player gets 3 handed to them at the start of the game. (The game has alternative rules for rolling them up if you don't want to use the deck - you just need to check that a costume you've rolled isn't already in someone else's hand, but there's no particular need to track discarded ones.) At that point, the player chooses one that their fairy's wearing at the opening of the story. They can change costume to one of the others in their hand any time their character's off camera (and the previous one isn't discarded), or spend points of Magic to quick-change in the middle of a scene. They can also scrounge up new costumes, either automatically when a character's off camera, or in the middle of a scene if it's an appropriate place for a fairy to find stuff to make a costume out of (possibly requiring a roll). The maximum hand size is 3, so finding a new costume will mean discarding an old one.

What does a Costume actually do? It gives you two additional Quirks that you can stack with the two you have on your character, and it gives you one or more special moves. Some of these are unrestricted, but more often they require either spending Magic or - for the more powerful cases - discarding the costume completely when you use them. (You can't discard your last costume, though. No naked fairies allowed.)

So, to see what we actually do with all of these, post 2 will cover the actual dice rules, and maybe a bit of the structure rules too (as I said, the book takes a lot of space explaining how to use the rules, but they're actually really simple).

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

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Council of Wyrms: METALLIC DRAGON POLITICS

Clan Sunblaze is a relatively young clan, established on Sunblaze Isle only one draconic generation ago. It is nor ruled by Sunray the Gold, daughter of the original leader, Sunblaze. They rule all of Sunblaze Isle, including its mountain chain along the shoreline and into the sea. They were former members of Clan Justice that wanted more freedom than Justice's rigid laws allowed. While still Lawful Good, they interpret both of those things more broadly than Clan Justice does by far. They have barely 30 dragons in the clan, all fairly young, and even Sunray herself is merely a 324-year old mature adult. Most of the clan lives in the City of the Sun, in the eastern mountains of the island. They have few vassals in the city, as the liberal view on law and goodness is only for dragons, not vassal races, who must live in feudal villages around the mountain. Most of the island is still wild, with numerous monsters still living in the areas the dragons have not yet cleared out. Sunray is very young for a clan leader, forced into the role when her father unexpectedly fell in battle against the fire giants, though he did manage to win the battle before his death. Sunray believes that the red dragons of Clan Magma either caused the invasion or at least helped the giants, but she has no proof of this at all. She knows her small clan and relatively weak forces make her island a tempting target for the more warlike dragon clans, and she wants to grow her clan's numbers or build strong alliances to stave off that danger. Clan Sunblaze is on pretty good terms with the amethyst Clan Starratiel, who live on nearby Starshine Isle, as both oppose Starshine's other clan - the green dragons of Clan Verdiste, who see Sunblaze as weak and ripe for plundering.

Clan Cloudwalker is the most powerful of the silver dragon clans, maintaining its domain in the northern peaks of the Silver Mountains and the jungle surrounding them on Silver Island. Their domain's capital is Cloud City, due to the permanent cloud cover around the peak it is built on. It is actually made of solid clouds, thanks to potent enchantments. Here, the demihuman vassals mingle freely with the dragons, as well as living in villages in the jungle below. The clan's leader is the great wyrm Agrannus, a cheerful and kind old lizard who lets anyone into his borders that has a good heart and is willing to contribute. Those that do not do their part for society are cast out once it becomes clear that they will not do anything no matter what. For those that want to contribute, however, the domain is a virtual paradise. Vassal races hold many important positions, and some are even taken as lifemates by dragons. Agrannus' current kindred is the elf fighter/mage Ryella, is also his mate. She handles the domain's daily business, and is well-loved by the people. The dwarf Longbeard also serves an important role, designing and expanding Cloud City. While Clan Cloudwalker is peaceful, they maintain a very strong military due to their dangerous neighbors, the black Clan Nightshriek of Dark Swamp Isle, who are happy to raid the demihumans of Silver Isle, and the red Clan Vermilion of Flame Strike Isle, who are growing far too large and need to either split their clan or conquer new territory. Vermilion the Fourth sees the former as unacceptable, so he wants to take the Silver Mountains for his own, if he can just beat Clan Cloudwalker. So far, the Council has kept this from becoming an all-out war, but the tensions are still rising.

Clan Pinnacle also lives in the Silver Mountains, mostly on the two southernmost islands. Their city, Pinnacle, uses the same cloud enchantments as Cloud City, but on a smaller scale. While Pinnacle and the peaks are abuzz with activity, the rest of Pinnacle territory is practically deserted, save for monsters and animals. The clan prefers the high places they've built up. It is believed that a half-dragon settlement exists somewhere in the valleys, and rumor has it that the clan lord, Firstclaw, even encourages their presence. Some believe that the half-dragons are actually led by one of Firstclaw's own children, though none dare say it in his presence. Many half-dragons seek Pinnacle lands as a result of these rumors, braving the many dangers of the journey in hope of finding a home. Whether that home exists is unknown. Firstclaw himself rules from a floating cloud-castle above the island, hiding the summit where his lair extends down to a cave for his hoard. However, Firstclaw and the dragons of Clan Pinnacle spend most of their time polymorphed and living among the demihumans, which makes other clans look down on them, seeing it as a weakness or even a mental illness. Casual visitors often have trouble telling a polymorphed dragon from a normal demihuman in Pinnacle, and the vassals share much of the decision-making with their lords, with very blurred lines of authority. Pinnacle's main administrator is the gnome woman Cerellen, who handles most details so Firstclaw can deal with larger problems. The position of First Administrator is actually hereditary in her family. Clan Pinnacle is friendly with the other silver clans and trades with the clans of the Bronze Cliffs, but are often raided by Clan Vermilion in its desire to expand into their lands. They are also a frequent target of fire giants from beyond the Burning Sea, who hunt their young and their eggs to be taken as slaves and crafting materials.

Clan Tempest is one of the largest of the bronze clans, ruling from the city of Water's Edge to northern face of the Bronze Cliffs - around 250 miles by 100 miles on Fireshore Island. Most of its dragons live in cliffside lairs, with their vassals tending jungle plantations or seaside fishing villages, while clan leadership rules from Water's Edge, which is built into both natural and constructed caverns, with many aeries and rising towers from the cliffside. Clan Tempest has a very large military, both land and naval, though its navy is unsuited to the open sea rather than interisland travel. While the naval vessels are warships by design, they are mostly used for fishing these days. The great wyrm Whitescale rules over Clan Tempest. His name comes from a single white scale on his chest, and his always attended by a demihuman entourage, who challenge him with riddles and puzzles. He is largely inactive these days due to age, and mostly deals with business matters for the clan, leaving all else to his council of advisors and his three sons, Whiteclaw, Stormwing and Seatooth. Clan Tempest is always skirmishing against the black dragons of Clan Mire, who share Fireshore Island with them. They battle over the unclaimed jungle that seperates their two domains. They also sometimes battle against the topaz Clan Seaspray over fishing rights.

Clan Cutharn is a recently formed copper clan. They were once part of Clan Rockclaw, the eldest and most powerful copper clan, but after a complex prank against the Rockclaw clan lord failed to get a good response, the prankster Lord Advocate Cutharn was insulted that his ingenuity was not recognized. Instead, he was banished. The details of the prank remain a mystery, but it is known that it caused a permanent rash of red spots along Lord Venomtail of Rockclaw's tail. Cutharn's allies and vassals moved with him to the shores of Rockshore Isle and declared themselves a new clan. It took five battles and seven council debates, but they have finally received a seat on the Council of Wyrms...but peace remains uneasy. The largest settlement in their land is the village of Cutharn, built around a large mine. It is primitive compared to even the smallest Rockclaw city, Cracked Peak, let alone anything bigger, and is a massive, open-topped maze surrounding the mine, which mostly produces silver and gold. Cutharn was an adult when he broke away, but is now an old dragon with a stable domain. He personally attends all meetings of the Council of Wyrms, so his son Necuthus usually handles the domain itself and is master of its military. Cutharn believes in a strong defense to maintain peace with Clan Rockclaw. Cutharn's kindred, the dwarf Kennbred, oversees the mine and defense of the village. Clan Rockclaw still wants the land Cutharn took back, and they don't see Clan Cutharn as a real clan at all - just disobedient children to be punished and then brought back to the fold. However, now they must be less overt in their efforts, as the Council has declared Cutharn a clan.

Clan Dewfeast lives on the southwest desert of Aridia Isle, where they maintain the village of Trade Town. It is a trading hub between the north and south of the island chain and has always been a neutral site for other clans to use on long flights and trade delegations. The domain is also home to Brasstown, a desert city that is the clan's capital. Brasstown is known for its baked clay sculptures and sand aeries for dragons to bask on. While some vassals live in the city, most instead live in scattered desert villages built around oases. Brazzen the Brass leads the clan from his Brasstown lair and prefers to meet visitors while sunbathing. He loves to talk about all kinds of incredibly boring and nerdy trivia, but refusing his conversation is an insult, and he likes to punish insults by having people buried to the neck in sand in front of his bathing platform, so he can talk to a captive audience. He regularly attends Council meetings as well. The demihumans of Dewfeast have little in the way of freedom or power - they're basically servants. All positions of real authority are held by dragons, and while there are rumors of underground efforts at demihuman rights, no evidence of actual rebellion has yet been found. Clan Dewfeast is on good terms with most clans thanks to Trade Town, and even the chromatics like them. The only openly hostile clan is the blue Clan Lightningwing, who share Aridia Isle and want some of Dewfeast's land. The last battle between them became a brief war that killed 50 vassals and six dragons (totaling both sides), and the Council is now monitoring the conflict to avoid escalation, though Lightningwing and her young clan have been pushing the boundaries.

The gem dragon clans now! There are four amethyst clans: Corum, Majyst, Regalen and Starratiel. The sapphires have five, largely beneath Bloodtide and Fireshore islands: Battlecry, Boldtail, Glitterwing, Phlare and Warclaw. The emerald clans are Firelake, Flamestrider, Maragdus, Sharpwail and Sonis. The topaz clans are Deepwater, Dryair, Pazus and Seaspray. The crystal clans are Coldshard, Luckwing, Moonlight, Sparkle, Starlight and Sunlight. Again, we get a few clan writeups, with the GM left to come up with the rest.

Clan Majyst rules Majyst Isle and has been one of the most influential gem clans of the last few generations. Their capital city, Clear Lake, is carved into forested hills around a large freshwater lake, and it is mostly ruled by amethyst democracy. It's a community of scholarship and learning, which offers much freedom to both dragon and vassal. Gemmena, a great wyrm, rules the clan and sees herself as the champion of the neutral dragons. Many other clans do defer to her leadership, so she's not far wrong. She tries to keep her clan and its allies out of the metallic/chromatic conflicts, as long as those don't endanger any gem dragons. Clan Majyst has had some conflict with the white Clan Frostwind raiding them for food, however. Their main allies are Clan Seaspray and Clan Sparkle.

Clan Warclaw are sapphires that live beneath the northeast mountains of Fireshore Island. They rule from Bottomtown, a subterranean settlement under an extinct volcano, and are led by Phirebolt. Yes, Phirebolt. Warclaw's army of dwarves, dragons and gnomes are the best-trained of all the clans, and the clan spends most of its time either growing or maintaining its forces. Gnomes are the favored vassals of the clan, with dwarves largely left to menial duties, both in and out of the army. Warclaw refuses to use elves in any way. The clan defeated its enemies long ago, and has been at peace for three generations due to its reputation for martial strength, but they continue to act as if on the verge of war. Phirebolt, after all, follows his family's tradition of maintaining peak fighting condition, and he can remember the battles with the drow in his youth, and the dangers they represented. He swore he'd never allow such a thing ever again. His daughters, Phyre and Phlame (yes, really) command the elite lair guard, protecting Warclaw's caverns against all threat. Clan Warclaw maintains strong ties with Clan Sharpwail, who rule the lands under which Warclaw has settled, and the two clans trade and assist each others' defenses.

Next time: Clans Maragdus, Deepwater and Starlight.

Doresh
Jan 7, 2015


hyphz posted:

108 shades of Fey: Costume Fairy Adventures

Fairy Fairies are best faries.

Kurieg posted:

???

ex-Zordon

If chromatic dragons crossbreed too much, a MegaZord Dragon is born. It vomits out giant swords.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

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Council of Wyrms: We Are The Crystal Gem Dragons

Clan Maragdus lives in the central mountains of Bloodtide Island. Their domain is closed to all outsiders and visitors, and they are quite xenophobic, as are most emerald dragon clans. Those with legitimate business must visit the vassal towns along the border, where visitors are, if not welcomed, at least tolerated. Most of the vassals are dwarves and gnomes, who handle all outside relations even with other dragons. The central city of Quietfire, built on a volcanic rim, maintain Maragdus' library of history and lore, and while Clan Maragdus is paranoid, it is also deeply curious about the goings on around it, and know more of the island chain's history and the lands beyond than any other clan, they few of them ever see those lands personally. The ruler of the clan is the great wyrm Maragdus, and even his own subjects are not allowed in his lair, which he rarely leaves. Indeed, only his kindred, the gnome woman Greltha, is allowed in. She takes care of all of his needs, including meeting with others he doesn't want to see. Maragdus' son, Aldus, is utterly unlike most emeralds, being outgoing and friendly. He loves to learn things and make friends, and privately, Maragdus believes the young dragon had some kind of shock while in the egg. However, Aldus is still allowed to serve as the clan's representative on the Council of Wyrms. Clan Maragdus maintains a treaty with Clan Battlecry - not out of trust, but because Maragdus fears them less than he fears the red dragons of Clan Firetongue, who live nearby and have frequently raided Maragdus' vassal villages in search of treasure.

Clan Deepwater lives on the southwest shore of Exaurdon Isle and is quite insular. Their capital, Coral City, is built on the sea by a mix of magic and careful coral tending. They use sea elves to care for the coral itself, while dragon-mages and dragon-priests shape it with spells. Despite the beauty, however, they do not welcome tourism or outsiders. Their vassals are largely elves and gnomes, with the landbound elves farming and fishing on the shore and the gnomes living in Coral City as servants or in coastal villages. The master of the clan is Squidkiller, who rules from an undersea grotto. He often hunts sea creatures around Coral City, and he despises all intruders, dragon or otherwise, so has left standing orders to drive out anyone that drops by. He has no patience for the Council and rarely even sends a representative. The green Clan Treesplitter lives nearby and dislikes not controlling the Deepwater lands, so they are often in conflict. However, because Squidkiller refuses to bring this up to the Council, he may well lose some of his lands despite his fierce defenses.

Clan Starlight lives in the far north, on Everwinter. They are a carefree, happy band of crystal dragons who build snow towers and ice sculptures of great beauty. The master of the clan is Stargazer the Old, but he (like most crystals) is irresponsible and leaves much of the domain's maintenance to his kindred, the elf priest Estera Icestrider, who consults with him only on matters of great importance. Even the other dragons bow to Estera's lead, though she is always sure to make her orders sound like suggestions. Stargazer's son, Skyrunner the Mage, is the clan's representative on the Council, and spends most of his time at the Council Aerie studying magic and lore. Skyrunner wants to gain as much knowledge as he can to be better able to lead the clan once his father dies, but his mother believes he should just leave that poo poo to the demihumans and spend his time playing around. Clan Starlight is often in danger of frost giant slave raids or hungry attacks by the white dragons of Clan Icetooth, as well as general danger from the local monsters, as they are the weakest kind of dragon.

The chromatic clans! The red clans are Bloodtide, Firetongue, Magma, Scortch and Vermilion. The blue clans are Clearsky, Jagtail, Lightningwing, Sandshaper, Sharpbolt and Swiftclaw. The green clans are Darkcloud, Evilwood, Foulgrove, Jadress, Treesplitter and Veriste. The black clans are Blackmoon, Blackwater, Boghold, Lurker, Mire, Nighthunt and Nightshriek. The white clans are Chillblood, Coldfire, Desolate, Everwinter, Frostwind, Glare, Iceteeth and Illsnow. You know the deal.

Clan Bloodtide rules over much of Bloodtide Island from three cities of stone and lava, carved out by slaves. The largest is Malice, home of the clan ruler, Firebrand. The realm is an oppressive one, home to hordes of slaves with broken spirits. Steaming mist covers the streets, and the lava lights even the night with a dim glow. The normally unbearable jungle heat is made even worse in the mountain cities, but the red dragons enjoy it. Firebrand is a great wyrm whose reign has been long and influential. He despises gold dragons, particularly Clan Exaurdon, and sees them as the only real threat to him taking over all the islands. He's dreamed up many plots to get rid of them, but acts on none, as he is unconfident in success. Everyone near Clan Bloodtide feels threatened by their greed, and they need many slaves to maintain their mines and lairs. They are happy to raid others to get those slaves, and will even capture other dragons if they can get away with it.

Clan Foulgrove lives in the heart of the Emerald Forest and are constantly plotting their own advancement. The green dragons have warped the forest into vile shapes and structures to form the living city Foulgrove, which is 25 square miles of living caves. The plants are apparently in pain, for reasons, and the green dragons enjoy it. The ruler of the clan is Chlorr the Green, who demands every living being in the forest bow to her. She commands not only demihuman vassals but a tribe of bugbears who worship her as a god and a small drow tribe that serve as her taskmasters. Clan Foulgrove has spies everywhere, gathering information Chlorr can use at the Council. Clan Foulgrove has no allies, but will viciously use any weakness they find. Part of their land, however, has been taken over by a banshee, and even the dragons avoid this Groaning Wood now, as they have no more resistance to anyone else against the banshee's killing wail. Some say the banshee is the mad spirit of the forest in pain, while others believe she is the ghost of an elf once enslaved by the clan who will not rest until all of Foulgrove's elves are free.

Clan Blackmoon lives in the southern swamps of Storm Island. They've never been a wealthy or powerful clan, and they have neither cities nor even many villages. They control a single mine, and little else. Once, it seemed they'd be absorbed by Clan Mire, and even the Council didn't take them seriously. That's all about to change, if the clan's lord, Deathstream, has his way. While Deathstream isn't very powerful, he has made a secret pact with Infernis, a dracolich that dates back to the Dragon War. Infernis is the true master of the clan now, a former red dragon that once ruled Clan Magma in life. He died at the hands of the gold dragon Baraster before the dragon slayers came, and now, Infernis wants revenge on Baraster's descendants. He's been looking for servants, and has finally found them in Clan Blackmoon. Few of Deathstream's kin know about Infernis, and they just think Deathstream has gotten more ambitious of late and found some source of wealth. As long as things keep going well, though, they probably wouldn't care even if they did find out. Infernis' plan now calls for the conquest of Clan Jagtail and the island of Storm. Deathstream's kindred, the gnome Kuniff Dell, is terrified of Infernis and his influence on Deathstream. He leads the feral demihumans of the clan and believes Infernis has come to destroy the laws and customs of dragon society. He is deeply tempted to reveal the dracolich, but fears the wrath of Infernis and Deathstream.

In general, a clan's ruler is known as a dragon lord, with all other dragons of a clan being known as dominates. Dragons earn no titles by birth, but must all earn them. A dragon lord's second in command is the grand lord advocate, who is served by the lords advocate, then the advocates, then the grand lord dominor, then the lords dominor, then the grand champion, and at the bottom, the champions. Once a dragon is named a champion, they are on the path to authority in the clan. The dragon lord's family are known as lordlings, but have little actual power just from that. They get a few privileges, but must earn everything else. However, once they do get rank, they are often expected to serve at higher level than others...and with greater success.

Any dragon under the age of adult can be called 'master,' while older dragons are 'grand master' regardless of rank. This began in vassal usage, but now even dragons often use the terms. There's also formal rules of address in High Draconic. All dragons of higher rank are to be addressed by title, while those of lower rank must only be called by name. Equal rank gets name but a prefix of respect - 'ul' for dragons up to level 5, and 'ur' for above that. In meetings of many dragon types, there are also prefixes for each type - 'au' for golds, 'ag' for silvers, 'cn' for bronze, 'cu' for copper, 'zu' for brass, 'ys' for amethyst, 'ir' for sapphire, 'al' for emerald, 'op' for topaz, 'ry' for crystal, 'cr' for red, 'az' for blue, 've' for green, 'dr' for black and 'li' for white. So a young white dragon named Snowfire could be ul-Snowfire or li'Snowfire, if for some reason you wanted to sound like an idiot.

Next time: Not clans.

Sampatrick
Sep 26, 2012


The dragon clan names might be the dumbest things I've ever seen in an RPG supplement.

megane
Jun 20, 2008





Dragons have good Str and a breath weapon, but -3 to Naming Stuff Without Sounding Stupid.

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Halloween Jack posted:

They don't breathe ice cream?

No, that's Todd the Candy Dragon.

Doresh
Jan 7, 2015


megane posted:

Dragons have good Str and a breath weapon, but -3 to Naming Stuff Without Sounding Stupid.

I'm pretty sure they sound way more majestic in High Draconic. Our primitive Common tongues just can't handle it.

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Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


megane posted:

Dragons have good Str and a breath weapon, but -3 to Naming Stuff Without Sounding Stupid.

Who's going to tell them they sound dumb as all hell (and not get eaten for it)?

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