Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
The Lone Badger
Sep 24, 2007



Mors Rattus posted:

96-00: Aethyric Feedback: Everyone within WPB yards of you, friend or foe, takes 1d10 Wounds, ignoring TB and APs, and becomes Prone. If there are no targets in range, the magic cannot vent, and so your head explodes and you die.

So that's why we keep apprentices around.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


That's not a bad change to how Ingredients work.

Alien Rope Burn
Dec 4, 2004

I wanna be a saikyo HERO!


Angry Salami posted:

Having most of the 'mystical native powers' (as written by a white guy) be set aside for a different book that never got written probably helps.

Yeah, there are some oddities like the one indigenous class referring us to a nonexistent racial bonus. But, still, compared to Spirit West, it's comparatively modest so far.

I actually kind of like the "magical cultural appropriation" notion (the Sham-Man) as a character concept if it had been handled a little more even-handedly.

JcDent posted:

Very Rifts of them to put prophecies about mystical doom of the world in a book about Mechanoids.

Well, just wait until the notion of the Mechanoids as the "Great Devourer" gets soft-retconned anyway!... I think it does? I'll be doing a Rifts metaplot summary sooner or later so I'll have to make sure then.

Mind, I think anything to do with the Mechanoids was put on hold for Mechanoid Space (the follow-up RPG to the Mechanoid Trilogy) that Siembieda has been swearing will come out any day now for the past two decades or so. You can even pre-order it, if you're in for setting $24.95 on fire. He's even been promising supplements and... Palladium's been a lot better at keeping to their solicits, but the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


Mors Rattus posted:

I haven't seen an exact date yet, though you could probably work one out based on the time since the Great War Against Chaos.

It's kind of a Generic Now, where Now is 'a period when things are relatively calm and stable and Archaeon is not a thing.'

This is fine. I've grown to like the Post Storm setting in 2e but just going 'You know what, gently caress it, let's just drop it' and leaving you free to come up with whatever grand plot (or lack thereof) you want is a good approach.

I've been pretty happy with the fluff in 4e so far. The fluff was something I was really worried about, but things seem fine.

JcDent
May 13, 2013

Give me a rifle, one round, and point me at Berlin!


WIZARDRY
explodes

Freaking Crumbum
Apr 17, 2003

Too fuck to drunk








Adventure 1: Exit 23 - Victory?






Dark*Matter posted:

Outside, the wind howls. You hear glass breaking and the doors of the lobby are flung open. A gust of icy wind sweeps through the building, as the storm suddenly reaches out for you. The squall knocks over all of the assembled gas lanterns, and as they gutter out you are left in complete darkness!

Doug managed to dispatch Dumont in one round without anyone else taking damage or suffering a fatality, but now the ice demon that's been haunting the White River Station is pissed. It knows that the only person capable of releasing it from its bondage is now dead (that was Dumont), and realizes that its only remaining chance for freedom is to find the magical focus that's binding it to our plane of reality. It doesn't know exactly what the focus is, but it can smell it with its supernatural senses, and the demon's positive that someone in the truck stop still has it. With this in mind, the demon decides the most expedient course of action is to murder all of the pesky humans that are still in the station and then look for the focus afterwards without interruption.



At this point, the Demon has entered through the hallway door past the arcade and the bathrooms (Rooms 3-5). Jane is still in the Lobby (Room 2) and Donna, Doug and Nadine are all in the Donut Shop (Room 8). Again, all of the other NPCs are assumed to be non-combatants that will do their best to hide or avoid the demon, but won't take direct action to confront it (and it's even harder for the heroes to convince them to act against the demon than it would have been to convince them to act against Dumont). The demon's preferred target list: Anyone visibly handling the snow globe (currently Doug) > Anyone visibly handling a weapon > Whomever is closest. The complete lack of visibility (remember, the demon extinguishes all the gas lamps when the scene starts) adds a +1 penalty modifier to any actions that require visual acuity, but at least the demon no longer gets combat bonuses for being in its home terrain (even though snow has started to blow into the station, it's still considered indoors).

The Decisive Battle Round 1:
Jane gets to act first. She's still pretty seriously wounded (4/9 Wounds remaining) but her first duty is to try and protect the other people in the station. She's not sure where the demon's going to come from, but she doesn't want to put anyone else at risk. She moves back into the McDonald's (Room 9) because it's a big room and she doesn't think anyone else is in there. She takes partial cover behind a table and chairs and holds her action to take a shot at the demon with her service pistol if it enters her field of view.
The Demon acts next. It doesn't see anyone in the hallway, so it moves from the hallway into the Lobby (Room 2). This allows Jane to see the monster and she immediately takes her held action to shoot at it. Unfortunately, between the darkness and the distance to her target, Jane misses her shot. Now the demon is aware that someone is shooting at it from McDonald's! It spends the rest of its action to move into the restaurant to finish off Jane.
Nadine has stopped filling her bucket with water. She hears Jane's gunfire and sees the demon dash across the Lobby. She's not armed with any kind of weapon, and starts to panic at the hopelessness of her situation. She wracks her brain trying to come up with some way to survive this encounter; making an untrained Awareness check, she manages to roll a Good success. In a moment of inspiration, Nadine begins to wonder if a snow demon would be at all adverse to fire. She remembers that she has 6 road flares in her car and decides to make a dash for the parking lot to try and extricate them from her vehicle - with her action, she moves from the Donut shop (Room 8) out to the Vestibule (Room 1).
Donna also sees the demon dash from the bathroom hallway and into the McDonald's and hears Jane's accompanying report. Although she still has her hold-out pistol in her purse, she's not entirely sure it's even worth trying to shoot whatever the hell it is that's now running around the station. She decides to sneak into the Convenience Store (Room 6) and see if there's anything she could possibly use to protect herself. She also makes an untrained Awareness check and gets an Ordinary success and finds several aerosol cans of AXE Body Spray along with a box of Bic lighters. She recalls reading a news article years ago about some teenager that managed to give themselves 3rd degree burns by trying to turn a can of hairspray into a flamethrower, but decides it might be worth the risk if it allows her to survive the night.
Doug is still trying to mentally process the fact that he just killed a man and the delay causes him to act last. By the time he's able to process what's going on, Donna and Nadine have already left the Donut Shop and the ice demon is bearing down on Jane. Thinking quickly, Doug scoops up the 9mm pistol that Dumont had been holding and dashes into the Lobby (Room 2). He's coming up behind his target again and decides to squeeze off a shot from the pistol. Unfortunately, his complete lack of familiarity with firearms and the stress of the situation cause his shot to go wide. It's not immediately clear whether the demon even notices his failed attack.

The Decisive Battle Round 2:
Nadine is the only one that didn't blow her initiative roll this round. She runs out of the Vestibule (Room 1) and into the parking lot, finds her vehicle, and manages to stuff all 6 road flares into her jacket pockets. Feeling a little more confident about her chances, she steels herself to go back inside and face the monster.
Donna wedges two AXE cans into her pockets, along with 2 lighters, and keeps a third can and lighter in her hands. She's heard the second gunshot by this point and her adrenaline is kicking, so she dashes back into the Lobby (Room 2) to confront her fears. At this point the demon is still on the opposite side of the room, so she spends the rest of her action prepping her makeshift flamethrower in case the demon rushes her.
Jane hears Doug's report but can't see the source and anyway the ice demon is bearing down directly on her! She squeezes off another shot from her pistol, and this time she hits her target! Unfortunately, if the ice demon was affected by the bullet it doesn't even show it (taking only 5 Stun damage). Jane then attempts to put some more distance between herself and the demon and dives behind the low counter of the napkin and ketchup station.
Doug sees Donna emerge from the Convenience store with her unorthodox flamethrower and realizes that fighting ice with fire might not be the worst idea. However, he's still holding the 9mm and decides to take another shot at the demon with the weapon he's already holding. He manages to roll an Ordinary success by the slimmest of margins, but again the demon doesn't respond with pain when the bullet blows a chunk of ice out of its torso (taking only 2 Stun damage).
The Demon is quickly realizing that its human prey aren't as harmless as they seem. Although both gunshots thus far haven't been fatal, it's nearly disoriented from the damage it has taken. Suddenly, the demon's supernatural senses kick into overdrive, and it realizes that the human shooting it from the opposite doorway is holding the magical foci (snow globe)! It lets loose an inhuman roar and dashes across the Lobby to viciously stab its target. It strikes true, stabbing Doug in his chest very near the pocket that's holding the snow globe. Doug recoils in pain (taking 3 Wound and 1 Stun damage) and since he's now lost more than half his total wounds, must make a Stamina - Endurance check to stay conscious. Unfortunately he fails, which means he collapses to the ground and drops Dumont's pistol.

The Decisive Battle Round 3:
Jane gets to act first again. From her vantage point, all that she can tell is that the demon suddenly moved away from her and instead attacked one of the other men in the station. She moves out from her cover and towards the McDonald's doorway and finds the ice demon now looming over Doug, fresh blood slowly freezing on its claws. Angry and frustrated, she curses the monster and fires another shot from her pistol. Another Ordinary success, and again the bullet doesn't even seem to phase the demon (taking only 2 Stun damage).
Nadine returns from the parking lot, making it as far as the Vestibule (Room 1) before looking into the Lobby and seeing the dire situation within. Acting on instinct, she grabs one of her road flares, cracks it to life, and hurls the flaming torch at the demon. She misses, but the open flame produces an immediate reaction from the demon as the road flare clatters to the ground near its feet. The creature roars again recoils away from the flare.
Donna also screams, a guttural noise of terror and adrenaline. Holding the AXE can aloft, she flicks her lighter, depresses the spray tab, and hopes for the best. The fireball that explodes from the can looks impressive, but neither item is actually intended to function as a weapon, and she fails to aim the blast accurately enough to hit the demon. Still, it shrieks again in panic at the sight of the massive gout of flame.
Doug has a chance to try and recover from his unconscious state. However, he fails his Stamina - Endurance check again, which leaves him helpless before the whims of the ice demon.
The Demon is in panic mode. It desperately wants to shred Doug's clothing to find where he's stashed the snow globe, but there's a lit road flare lying only a few feet away, and another one of the humans just launched a massive fireball in its direction. It has to make a successful Willpower ability check with a +2 penalty to remain near Doug's body on account of the road flare; it gets an Ordinary success, which is good enough. With little care for the human beneath it, the demon uses its razor sharp claws to slice into Doug's clothing, hunting for the snow globe. This process gravely injures Doug (he takes 6 Wound and 3 Stun damage) and since he's now lost all of his Wound points, he's at serious risk of dying. However, the demon manages to reclaim the snow globe from his shredded vest. The monster is victorious!

Dark*Matter posted:

The howling of the wind and the screaming winter-demon rise to an intolerable pitch. Stinging ice scours your flesh, and waves of bitter cold rake your body. Then, the creature seems to explode into a spray of ice, dissipating in the wind. Its chattering howls die with it, slowly fading away. The wind relents, and the malign sentience of the storm outside seems to vanish as well. As mysteriously as the demon appeared, it's gone.


Denouement:
Nadine is able to utilize her medical training and the trauma kit from the trunk of her car to stabilize Doug and snatch him from the jaws of death. The remaining survivors utilize whatever else they can scrounge from the truck stop to relight the gas lanterns and huddle together for warmth. Sometime shortly after sunrise, Jonas Riley becomes conscious again, though he's weak and exhausted. He does his best to carefully question everyone present, and manages to compile a more-or-less accurate version of the night's events based on everyone's recollections.

When the rest of the survivors agree that Jane, Doug, Nadine and Donna were directly responsible for everyone's safety, he thanks them graciously and hands each of them one of his business cards for the Hoffman Institute. "You've all handled yourselves with remarkable courage and resourcefulness, and you kept almost everyone here alive. We're extremely interested in hiring people like you," he explains.

Once the first snow plows arrive and see the carnage at the scene, emergency calls are made for medical and police assistance. Jonas manages to insinuate himself as the de-facto spokesperson for the survivors; everyone else is either too exhausted or too injured to want to deal with the sudden influx of government agents. Jonas is in his element though, and manages to secure medical treatment for everyone in need, as well as provide an extremely plausible cover story about a deranged trucker gone off the deep end (essentially blaming Dumont for all of the death and destruction and completely ignoring the supernatural element). Everyone more or less corroborates his story with their accounts, and the whole thing is chalked up to the deranged nature of one lone psychopath.

Dark*Matter posted:

Time passes; bones heal, wounds mend. Although the survivors eventually go their separate ways, it isn't long before each of you are again contacted by Jonas Riley of the enigmatic Hoffman Institute. You each share a unique bond, having survived a direct encounter with the supernatural, and Jonas explains to each of you how your particular skill set and penchant for survival are valuable tools in his particular line of work. After enough gentile persuasion, he manages to convince each of you to meet up with him again, this time for a formal job offer at a Hoffman Institute branch office. The offer is too good to refuse, and in short order you find yourself signing on the dotted line, newly inducted Agents in Training in the employ of the Hoffman Institute.

If only you knew then what was going to happen next, would you have still made this choice?


Retrospective:
The four heroes chosen for the adventure didn't actually do too poorly. The main thing that was working against them was the fact that none of the four possessed any knowledge of, or familiarity with, the occult or supernatural. Dr. Akens is the only pre-gen hero with occult knowledge, so without him you're basically relying on the players to get extremely creative with how they solve problems. The only things that the party really missed out on that Dr. Akens could have changed would have been learning early on that the monster was likely afraid of / weak to fire (it actually completely negates its armor), that it's likely also vulnerable to silver (doesn't completely ignore the demon's armor, but downgrades it to Ordinary quality) and more information about the snow globe (including how to destroy it).

Some of that information could have also been pried out of Dumont if they had managed to subdue him rather than immediately merk him (nice Amazing melee roll, Doug) which actually makes it one of the few situations in an RPG where it's better to try and subdue your foe, but that might not occur to many real players either. Also, the monster can't actually be killed unless you destroy the snow globe first; even if you use fire, it'll eventually reform itself on the material plane and resume its hunt for the globe.

There's also the chance the the players might not resolve the fire encounter before it gets out of hand - it's entirely possible that the fire consumes the entire truck stop, which forces everyone out into the blizzard, which means the ice demon likely slays everyone in record time.

And it's possible that none of the players ever discover the snow globe in the bathroom trashcan in the first place; in that case, Dumont recovers it right before the fire encounter, and once he has it he effectively controls the demon as a minion, so it's very likely he can slaughter everyone in the truck stop with little difficulty. He still starts the fire, and then when everyone is trying to put it out, he and the demon ambush the survivors, starting with the heroes. Although the demon normally fears fire, in this case Dumont can force the demon to obey his commands, so it doesn't have to make Willpower checks to stay in combat.

One situation that the book doesn't cover is "What if the heroes just give the demon the snow globe?" Since the demon's only motivated to escape its bondage, RAW giving it the snow globe would allow it to immediately flee the White River Station, leaving Dumont completely without a plan. I would imagine that at that point he'd either freak out and attempt to murder everyone anyway, or else if the players seem particularly competent and well armed, he might just slink back out to his truck and become a recurring nemesis for the party (still nursing his grudge for them freeing his bound ice demon).

Another situation the book doesn't cover: if the players find the snow globe, manage to destroy the demon and subdue/kill Dumont, but don't destroy the snow globe or turn it back over to Jonas in the morning, then the ice demon itself could become a recurring nemesis for the party. It continues to hunt them over and over until it's either successful in recovering the globe, the players destroy the globe themselves, or they realize that the demon is bound to the globe and turn the ice demon into their own minion. The last option here seems like the biggest risk for a GM as the ice demon is a definite combat monster, and you'd need to come up with some pretty significant consequences to counterbalance the fact that the players can call on it whenever they're in trouble.

All-in-all, I like this adventure and think it does a decent enough job introducing new players to the setting and giving them an idea of what an average adventure should look like. It's potentially short enough that you could run it in one session, and provides multiple interesting implications for future adventures, regardless of how the party resolves it.


NEXT TIME: The Second Pre-made Adventure

MonsterEnvy
Feb 4, 2012


RocknRollaAyatollah posted:

Wasn't the implication in End Times that the flames are supposed to horribly burn the candidate but if they're worthy they still survive? The High Elves use protection spells for the candidates but they were doing it wrong, technically cheating, and Malekith was doing it right. http://warhammerfantasy.wikia.com/wiki/Asuryan#Revelations_during_the_End_Times

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay is one of the few times I've ever been excited in my adult life at the possibility of a source book on elves.

The End times retconned it by saying that Malekith was supposed to be burned and reborn by the fire and failed his test by jumping out of it first. Rather then the original story of him just no longer being worthy cause he teamed up with Chaos and murdered the King.

MonsterEnvy
Feb 4, 2012


Night10194 posted:

When does 4e take place? Like 2511 or so? I know they wanted to avoid the Storm even being a thing.


A date comes later in the book.

Edit:By checking it's at least 2508 IC as that is the last recorded date. The normal date for events in Warhammer is 2521 to 22. (Which is also the years that the End Times and Storm of Chaos start at.) After Storm of Chaos takes place 2528

MonsterEnvy fucked around with this message at 01:33 on Sep 22, 2018

punishedkissinger
Sep 20, 2017



I'm too impatient to wait for the starter adventure. What should I run instead?

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



WFRP 4e - Never Believe It's Not So

First off, spells are like blessings and miracles in that if you cast them with extra SL over the CN required, you can boost them. For every 2 SLs over you go, you can add an additional Range, Area of Effect, Duration or Target in multiples of the initial value of the spell. IE, a spell that has a base range of 5 yards adds 5 yards every time you add Range. Self-targeting spells can never have their range or target changed, touch-range spells can't have their range extended, and instant spells can't have their duration extended. You can pick the same option more than once. Some spells have their own options. Also, worth keeping in mind: high CNs are very hard to hit! The only real you're going to do it is by spending rounds channeling - there is effectively no other way to hit CNs higher than 6 for most characters.

Petty Magic, called cantrips by the Colleges, use tiny amounts of whatever Winds are available, and once you enter a College, you rarely learn new ones. They are the magical tricks you naturally pick up when the spark of magic awakens within you. This generally happens around puberty, and almost always by the age of 25. They're usually the first sign that you have magic. Elves consider the use of Petty magic just part of growing up, and those that seem interested are given proper schooling. For Humans, if they avoid lynching, it means they're likely to be picked up by a Magister as an apprentice and sent to the Colleges, after which they should never use Petty Magic again. Most wizards still do, of course. They are technically legally classed as witchcraft and therefore are illegal to perform; the Colleges turn a blind eye to it because some of them are just really useful. Witch Hunters do not always do so. Petty spells have no formal codifications, so you can name yours whatever you want. Petty Spells do not count as being from a Lore.

Petty Spells
Animal Friend (CN 0): For one hour, 1 creature within 1 yard that is smaller than you and has the Bestial trait trusts you completely and considers you a friend.
Bearings (CN 0): You sense the flow of magic from its source, instantly determining which way is North.
Dazzle (CN 0): 1 target you touch gains 1 Blinded Condition, and 1 Blinded Condition at the start of each round for WPB Rounds.
Careful Step (CN 0): For WP minutes, no organic matter you step on is damaged in any way, springing back to its original position when you move. Those trying to pursue you in rural areas get -30 to Track tests while this is active.
Conserve (CN 0): You preserve up to a day's worth of rations within 1 yard for WPB days. During this time, they will not rot, get mold or go stale, though external forces such as fire can harm them and they can still get wet or poisoned.
Dart (CN 0): You fire a +0 Damage magic missile at 1 target within WP yards.
Drain (CN 0): You touch 1 target, draining their life as +0 Damage magic missile that ignores APs. You then heal 1 Wound.
Eavesdrop (CN 0): You can hear what 1 target within WP yards is saying for IB minutes, as if you were standing right next to them.
Gust (CN 0): You create a brief gust of wind within WP yards, strong enough to blow out a candle, slam an open door or blow a few papers around.
Light (CN 0): You create a light equivalent to a torch, glowing from your hand, staff or other part of your person, for WP minutes. While this is active, you may make a Channeling test at +20 to increase the light to lantern strength or decrease it to candle strength.
Magic Flame (CN 0): A small flame flickers to life in the palm of your hand for WPB Rounds. It will not burn you but does emit heat and sets flammable things on fire. It's a lighter, basically.
Marsh Lights (CN 0): You create IntB flickering magical lights within WP yards, resembling torches or hooded lanterns. They last for WP minutes, and you may control their movements as long as they remain in your line of sight by spending an Action to make a +20 Channeling test. Success lets you move them in any direction. They move continually in a straight line at a walking pace, passing through any solid material in their path harmlessly, unless you roll again to change their direction.
Murmured Whispers (CN 0): You cast your voice to a point within WP yards, regardless of line of sight, for WPB Rounds. Your voice sounsd from that point for the duration, audible to anyone in earshot.
Open Lock (CN 0): 1 non-magical lock you touch opens.
Produce Small Animal (CN 0): You reach into a bag, pocket or hat, or under a rock, bush or burrow, etc. You pull out a single small animal of a type you'd expect in the vicinity, like a rabbit, dove or rat. If there are no appropriate local animals, nothing happens. The animal acts as is normal for it; you have no control over its temperament.
Protection from Rain (CN 0): You remain dry for TB hours, regardless of the weather and precipitation. This will work on snow, sleet, hail or any other water falling from the sky, but not standing water.
Purify Water (CN 0): You purify all water within 1 receptacle (such as a flask or stein) within 1 yard. All non-magical impurities, like poison or contaminants, are removed, leaving it clean, crisp and potable. If the vessel held another liquid that is mostly water, such as ale or wine, that is also purified, rendering it delicious, pure and non-alcoholic water. (This is a fairly big deal in a setting where most water is not safe.)
Rot (CN 0): You cause 1 fist-sized volume of organic material within 1 yard to immediately rot. Foods perish, clothes crumble, leather shrivels (and loses 1 AP on a single hit location) and so on, as determined by the GM.
Sleep (CN 0): 1 target you touch falls asleep for WPB Rounds. If they were Prone, they become Unconscious, remaining so for the duration or until awakened by loud noises or being jostled, which awakens them instantly. If they were sitting or standing, they become Prone but awaken immediately. If the targets are not resisting and are suitably tired, they will, when the spell ends, pass into deep, restful slumber.
Spring (CN 0): You touch the ground, drawing forth 1 pint of water per Round, for WPB Rounds or until you get IB pints, whichever comes first.
Shock (CN 0): You touch 1 target, giving them 1 Stunned Condition.
Sly Hands (CN 0): For WBP rounds, you may teleport small objects, no bigger than your fist, from about your person into your hand.
Sounds (CN 0): You create small noises within WP yards. They are quiet, indistinct noises that sound as if they come from a specific location within range, regardless of line of sight, and last for WPB Rounds. They may sound like something specfic, such as footsteps or animal howls, but nothing so distinct as to convey a message. You may control the sounds during the duration with a +20 Channeling test, with success allowing you to move them to another point within range or to make them louder or quieter.
Twitch (CN 0): You cause 1 object within WPB yards to move slightly. It might fall from a shelf, or a book might slam shut. If someone is holding the object, they must make a Dex test at +20 or drop it.
Warning (CN 0): You channel magic into 1 object within 1 yard, noticing immediately if it has been poisoned or trapped.

Arcane Spells are common formations of magic. How they actually manifest depends on which Lore you have. Someone with Arcane Magic (Fire) may cast Drop by making something overheat, while Arcane Magic (Shadows) might make it just insubstantial enough to slip through someone's fingers. Arcane Spells are considered to belong to every Lore - including Hedgecraft, Witchcraft, Dark Magic lores and Chaos Lores. They get all the benefits of Lore spells, and you can only share and teach them with people that have the same Lore as you. Some of them allow you to make WP tests when they would end to extend them an extra Round, marked with a +. The names of each spell can be customized for your lore as you please.

Arcane Spells
Aethyric Armor (CN 2): For WPB+ Rounds, all of your hit locations get +1 AP.
Aethyric Arms (CN 2): You create a weapon in any shape you desire, using any Melee skill you desire, with Damage of your WPB. It lasts for WPB+ Rounds and counts as Magical.
Arrow Shield (CN 3): For WPB+ Rounds, any missiles containing organic matter, such as arrows with wooden shafts, that pass within an AOE of WPB yards of you are automatically destroyed, dealing no damage to their targets. Inorganic missiles such as throwing knives or bullets are unaffected.
Blast (CN 4): You target an AOE of WPB yards on a point within WP yards. Anyone in the area suffers a +3 Damage magic missile due to the magical blast.
Bolt (CN 4): 1 target within WP yards suffers a +4 Damage magic missile.
Breath (CN 6): You immediately make a Breath attack out to 1 yard, as if you had spent 2 Advantage activating the Breath creature trait. This is a magic missile with +TB Damage; the GM decides what type of Breath attack best fits your Lore.
Bridge (CN 4): You conjure a bridge of magical energy within WP yards, with a maximum length and breadth of WPB yards, for WPB+ Rounds. For every 2 SLs, you may increase length or breadth by WPB yards.
Chain Attack (CN 6): You fire a +4 Damage magic missile at 1 target within WP yards. If it drops them to 0 Wounds, it leaps to another target within WP yards of both you and the initial target, repeating the same Damage. It may leap up to WPB times, +1 per 2 SLs.
Corrosive Blood (CN 4): You gain the Corrosive Blood creature trait for WPB Rounds.
Dark Vision (CN 1): You gain the Dark Vision creature trait for WPB Rounds.
Distracting (CN 4): You gain the Distracting creature trait for WPB Rounds.
Dome (CN 7): You make a dome of magical energy that blocks attacks for WPB Rounds. Anyone within an AOE of WPB yards gains the Ward (6+) creature trait against any ranged or magical attacks coming from outside the dome. Those within can attack out of the dome normally, and anyone can move through the dome safely.
Drop (CN 1): You channel magic into 1 object being held by 1 target in WP yards. This can be anything - rope, a sword, someone's hand. Unless they make a Dex test, they let go of it. For every 2 SLs, you can give them cumulative -10 to the test.
Entangle (CN 3): You entrap 1 target within WP yards, wrapping them in something suitable to your Lore. They gain 1 Entangled condition with Strength equal to your Int. For every +2 SLs, you may give 1 additional Entangled condition. This lasts until all Entangled conditions are removed.
Fearsome (CN 3): You gain Fear 1 for WPB Rounds. For every +3 SLs, you may increase your Fear rating by 1.
Flight (CN 8): You gain the Flight (Agility) creature trait for WPB+ Rounds.
Magic Shield (CN 4): You get +WBP SLs to any Dispel attempts you make for WPB Rounds.
Move Object (CN 4): You magically grab 1 nonsentient object within WP yards, moving it by your will alone (with S equal to your WP) for 1 Round. You may move it up to WPB yards per round, and anyone attempting to impede the thing's movement must contest your WP with their S. For every +2 SLs you may increase the distance per round by WPB yards.
Mundane Aura (CN 4): For WPB minutes, you appear entirely mundane to the Magical Sense Talent and any other means of detecting magic. While this is active, you cannot cast any other spells. This ends immediately if you make a Channeling test.
Push (CN 6): All living creatures within WPB yards of you are shoved WPB yards back and become Prone. If this slams them into a wall or other large obstacle, they take (yards travelled) Damage. For every +2 SLs, you may shove all targets back another WPB yards.
Teleport (CN 5): You teleport up to WPB yards, ignoring any obstacles or dangers in between. For every 2 SLs, you may increase your max travel distance by WPB yards.
Terrifying (CN 7): You gain the Terror 1 creature trait for WPB Rounds.
Ward (CN 5): You gain the Ward (9+) Creature Trait for WPB Rounds.

Lore of Beasts spells wield the Amber Wind, Ghur. Whenever you cast a Lore of Beasts spell, you may choose to gain the Fear 1 creature trait for 1d10 Rounds. Also, you can wear leather armor. Common ingredients incorporate animal fur, bone or pelts wrapped in sinew and daubed with blood runes, scrimshawed claws, dried organs, featheres dipped in rare humors, as well as excrement, urine or other excretions.
Amber Talens (CN 6): For WPB Rounds, your unarmed attacks made with Melee (Brawling) are Magical and have Damage equal to your WPB, and whenever they cause any Wound loss the target also suffers +1 Bleeding condition.
Beast Form (CN 5): You warp your body into an animal form, selected from any of the Beasts of Reikland in the Bestiary, for WP minutes. You use all of its standard traits, and for every 2 SLs you may include 1 Optional Trait. While in Beast Form, you appear as a normal version of that creature with amber and brown coloring. You cannot speak, which means you can neither cast spells nor Dispel. (Notable good combat forms: bears, boars, sufficiently large giant spiders, sufficiently large snakes, wolves. Especially if you grab some of their nastier Optional Traits, like Enormous on a snake or bear or Frenzy on a boar or wolf.)
Beast Master (CN 10): Your breath and eyes shine with amber, and you convince 1 creature with the Bestial trait within WPB yards that you are its pack master for WPB days. It will fight to the death defending you, and will follow your instructions. It instinctively understands any simple instructions. If the spell ends by any means, the creature will retain enough residual respect and fear not to attack you unless compelled to, though it may still attack your allies. (Note: some truly insane poo poo has the Bestial trait.)
Beast Tongue (CN 3): For WP minutes, you may speak to any creature with the Bestial trait and be undertood. Your words emerge in the form of snarls, hisses and roars based on what you're talking to. While they are not compelled to answer or obey you, most will be curious enough to at least hear you out. For the duration, you get +20 to all Charm Animal and Animal Training tests, but may not speak any language except that of the beasts. You may communicate with other beings only via gestures or Language (Battle), and for the duration you can neither cast spells nor Dispel, as you can't speak Language (Magick).
Flock of Doom (CN 8): You call down a murder of crows (or similar birds) to a point within WP yards to attack your foes for WPB Rounds. Anyone within WPB yards of the point who does not have the Arcane Magic (Beasts) Talent is attacked, suffering a +7 Damage hit at the end of each Round for the duration. As an Action, you may make a Charm Animal test at +20 ot move the flock to another point within range. Anyone within the AOE also gains +1 Blinded condition while in it.
Hunter's Hide (CN 6): For WPB tounds, you cloak yourself in Ghur, getting +20 Toughness and the Acute Sense (Smell) Talent as well as the Dark Vision and Fear 1 creature traits.
The Amber Spear (CN 8): You fire a massive spear of pure Ghur in a straight line WP yards long. It is a Damage +12 magic missile that strikes the first creature in the line, ignoring APs from armor made of fur or leather. If the target suffers any Wounds, they also get +1 Bleeding condition, after which the spear continues on its path, striking each target along that line in turn, but for -1 Damage each time. If the spear fails to cause any Wounds, it stops and the spell is over. Any target after the first may reduce the damage the Amber Spear causes to 0 via TB and APs rather than taking the normal minimum of 1.
Wyssan's Wildform (CN 8): You surrender yourself to savage fury for WPB Rounds, gaining the Arboreal, Armor 2, Belligerent, Big, Bite (SB+1), Fear 1, Fury, Magical and Weapon (SB+2) creature traits. For the duration, you cannot use any Language or Lore skills whatsoever.

Lore of Death spells wield the Purple Wind, Shyish. You may cause any living target affected by a Lore of Death spell you cast to gain +1 Fatigued condition. A target can only have a single Fatigued condition from this at any one time - so you can't just keep stacking them on someone. Common ingredients incorporate the bones of sentient creatures, the trappings of death (such as coffin wood or nails, embalming fluids, hourglasses, silver coins or gravce dirt), often preserved and engraved. Purple gemstones and materials are also used, as are purple flowers, especially roses.
Caress of Laniph (CN 7): Your hand appears withed and skeletal as you touch 1 target. This is a +6 Damage magic missile that ignores TB and APs. For every 2 Wounds caused, you may heal 1 Wound.
Dying Words (CN 6): You touch 1 body of a person that died within the last day, calling its soul back briefly. For WPB Rounds, you may communicate with them, though the soul can do nothing but talk. It is not compelled to answer you, but dead souls never lie.
Purple Pall of Shyish (CN 9): Purple strands of magic wrap around you for WPB Rounds, granting +WPB APs on all locations and the Fear 1 creature trait. For every +2 SLs, you may increase the Fear rating by 1.
Sanctify (CN 10): You create a magic circle along the ground you touch, warding it with Shyish, with an AOE of WPB yards out form you. It lasts for WP minutes, and creatures with the Undead trait cannot enter or leave the circle.
Scythe of Shyish (CN 6): You conjure a mystic scythe for WPB Rounds. It is wielded with the Melee (Polarm) skill, acting as a normal scythe with Damage (WPB+3). Enemies with the Undead trait cannot gain Advantage while engaged with you for the duration. It does not appear to be Magical, though, which I think might be an error.
Soul Vortex (CN 8): You hurl a ball of purple flame at a point within WP yards, where it erupts in an AOE of WPB yards, swirling with ghostly, gaping faces. Targets within the AOE gain +1 Broken condition. Targets with the Undead trait suffer a Damage +10 magic missile that ignores TB And APs.
Steal Life (CN 7): You send strands of purple mist at 1 target within WP yards, who wastes away when struck. This is a +6 Damage magic missile that ignores APs and also causes +1 Fatigued condition. Further, you remove all Fatigued conditions you currently have, and may heal yourself up to half the Wounds the target suffers, rounding up.
Swift Passing (CN 6): You touch 1 mortally wounded target, who must have no more than 0 Wounds and at least 2 Critical Wounds. They die, and may never be raised as Undead.

Next time: Fire, Heavens, Metal, Life

Mors Rattus fucked around with this message at 14:05 on Sep 22, 2018

OvermanXAN
Nov 14, 2014


MonsterEnvy posted:

The End times retconned it by saying that Malekith was supposed to be burned and reborn by the fire and failed his test by jumping out of it first. Rather then the original story of him just no longer being worthy cause he teamed up with Chaos and murdered the King.

Yeah, to my knowledge Malekith actually being the rightful king in any way was an End Times development that wasn't a thing before then. Certainly wasn't implied to be the case in the Dark Elf and High Elf armybooks from back when I was actually playing the wargame. (Around when Nemesis Crown was the ongoing event, if that puts it in context for people)

The Lone Badger
Sep 24, 2007



Mors Rattus posted:

Produce Small Animal (CN 0): You reach into a bag, pocket or hat, or under a rock, bush or burrow, etc. You pull out a single small animal of a type you'd expect in the vicinity, like a rabbit, dove or rat. If there are no appropriate local animals, nothing happens. The animal acts as is normal for it; you have no control over its temperament.

I hope the party likes rabbit stew, because they're going to be eating a lot of it.

wiegieman
Apr 22, 2010

Royalty is a continuous cutting motion




Malekith being Asuryan's chosen ruler fits perfectly, because Asuryan is a gigantic tool.

MonsterEnvy
Feb 4, 2012


OvermanXAN posted:

Yeah, to my knowledge Malekith actually being the rightful king in any way was an End Times development that wasn't a thing before then. Certainly wasn't implied to be the case in the Dark Elf and High Elf armybooks from back when I was actually playing the wargame. (Around when Nemesis Crown was the ongoing event, if that puts it in context for people)

Events that still take place in Warhammer Fantasy still treat it as him just straight up being unworthy. Like Total Warhammer.



I really like how they have done Magic. All the Lore spells feel useful. And the fact that you can use channeling to heavily buff them makes them even better.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



The balance point seems to be that Blessings and Miracles are much easier to enact but smaller and weaker; Fire, Life and Light all get more efficient healing, but the high CNs (4, 6 and 9 respectively) mean you are almost certainly going to have to channel to hit them - even a CN of 4 is hard to hit reliably without channeling, because on a non-channeled cast that means you need to beat your Language (Magic) test by approximately 40. Hope you had some Warpstone handy!

Oh, and priests just get crazy good weaponry and are allowed armor.

e: so basically, arcane magic takes longer to cast and is riskier because Channeling has increased fumble chances, but is more powerful single-shot.

RocknRollaAyatollah
Nov 26, 2008



Lipstick Apathy

OvermanXAN posted:

Yeah, to my knowledge Malekith actually being the rightful king in any way was an End Times development that wasn't a thing before then. Certainly wasn't implied to be the case in the Dark Elf and High Elf armybooks from back when I was actually playing the wargame. (Around when Nemesis Crown was the ongoing event, if that puts it in context for people)

It was a big change to make elf Hitler the one true king. I honestly think it was a spur of the moment way to abolish all army distinctions for elves.

Also,

wiegieman posted:

Malekith being Asuryan's chosen ruler fits perfectly, because Asuryan is a gigantic tool.

Angrymog
Jan 29, 2012

Really Madcats



The Lone Badger posted:

I hope the party likes rabbit stew, because they're going to be eating a lot of it.

We had Dove butties. This was in a terrible 1e game where the GM was a stickler for wilderness realism (he wass a scoutmaster) and we'd had our supplies ruined by not meticulously describing how we set up our shelters for the night. So when he said most of our food was ruined, we looked at the halfling's spell list, saw Create Small Animal, and went "gently caress you, we're eating Dove butties."

Ronwayne
Nov 20, 2007

That warm and fuzzy feeling.


GM's having little obsessions related to their interests outside gaming can either make a game great or really really obnoxious.

Deptfordx
Dec 23, 2013



I'm currently running Storm Kings Thunder (5E) and the Clerics Create food and water and the Bards Leomunds Tiny Hut made any bit where "You are trekking through a hostile wilderness, every day is a struggle for survival!" meaningless.

Alien Rope Burn
Dec 4, 2004

I wanna be a saikyo HERO!




Rifts World Book 19: Australia, Part 13 - "Welcome to the savagery of Rifts Australia."

Weapons & Equipment

Because technology is hoarded by the tech-cities, Australia doesn't have an easy means of production when it comes to mega-damage weapons. Apparently, most people outside of the tech-cities only have S.D.C. weapons, with player characters being presumed to be the rare exception. This is one of the reasons, apparently, civilization in the Outback is on the brink of destruction, since monsters can seriously threaten them. They don't use the credit, instead using plastic, pre-rifts Australian dollars in some places. However, trade and barter are more common. For "ease of play" dollars are treated as equal to credits. Bionics are rare outside of the tech-cities, and full conversion cyborgs are practically unheard of.

We get a lot of general survival gear from firestarting devices to silt goggles. A lot of the technological devices used for survival in America are far more expensive outside of the tech-cities. Techno-wizard items are unheard of outside of the Mokoloi, and they aren't sharing. We get some general guidelines for S.D.C weapons, as well as boomerangs, pneumatic crossbows, and spears, but all of that is pretty academic because few PCs would be using them. That makes both the long list of weapon modifications you can make (from fancy grips to barrel extensions and so on) and the rules for weapon deterioration when finding a lost or abandoned gun. Granted, the weapon deterioration rules could be extended to mega-damage weapons, which honestly isn't a bad idea if you want to make finding "treasure" a bit more work than just finding it, requiring you to fix it up and make it usable.


Some Steyr AUG inspiration, seemingly...

High-Tech Weaponry from Perth and and Melbourne (both mainly manufactured by the undetailed "NeraTech" or "ATA", which doesn't make sense because the two aren't connected, but whatever) is covered, giving us yet another stack of guns. The first group is just S.D.C. firearms, which we can skip. Mega-damage weapons like the NeraTech Light Energy Pistol, NeraTech M-01 Military and Police Sidearm, ATA 003, "Boom-Boom" Hard Ammo Sidearm, and ATA P-2/10 "Popper" High-Powered Derringer are all unexceptional for the game line save for the use of "EIPP" (pronouced "Eep!") technology. See, the cities banned use of energy weapons outside of the military, so manufacturers got around the ban by creating a liquid that's superheated and fired out of the barrel as a plasma "bullet", and so is mega-damage but isn't covered by the ban (yet). Other examples of the technology include the ATA "Super 10" Shotgun, which at least has a 50% chance of knocking down a humanoid-sized target to differentiate it. However, the illegal-to-civilians ATA "Mega-20" Shotgun" does much better damage but for some reason doesn't knock down. The ATA P-20/20 Plasma Sidearm and NeraTech M-21 Heavy Particle Beam Cannon are more conventional plasma weapons and are banned to civilians as a result. The M-21 at least has a "semi-crit" effect where it does more damage on a strike of 18+.


... but I'm pretty sure there's a reason bullpup pistols aren't shaped like this.


Or this?


what is this even no stop

However, this book does try and vary up the typical weapons list a little:
  • NeraTech 1-20 "Mankiller" Ion Pistol: This is an ion weapon that (somehow, unlike other ion guns so far) that penetrates normal body armor (but not power armor / vehicles) and does damage directly to the S.D.C. of the wearer. It also can be used to try and damage electronics slightly, giving them a minor penalty that can be accumulated.
  • NeraTech Pn-50 "SplatterGun": This is basically just a paintball gun loaded with mega-damage acid or poisons. This can include sleep gas, which is a save-or-sleep if you don't have protection, and similarly nerve gas is very nasty, pretty much killing anybody who doesn't have environmental armor and isn't mega-damage. M.D. creatures still take serious damage, though demons are immune to it for unexplained reasons.
  • ATA "Pinpoint" Needler Handgun: Fires needles that (somehow) can penetrate mega-damage armor to deliver a poison. Drugged needles do damage directly to S.D.C. on a failed save, but minimal effect to mega-damage creatures.
  • ATA "20K" Volt-Taser: Another weapon that bypasses non-environmental personal armor, this pretty much takes somebody out for minutes on a failed save, or causes them to lose a few attacks otherwise. There's a military version that also does mild damage directly to the target as well. This is a classic "fires wires" kind of taser, and so it takes an attack to reel the electrodes back.
  • ATA A-50 "Icer" Energy-Arc Thrower This is essentially an electrolaser, using a laser to fire a lighting bolt. Despite its size and impressive SFX, though, it does crap damage. No, it doesn't have the effect of the taser above. That'd make sense!
  • NeraTech "Fletcher 12" Light Rail Gun or NeraTech "Bushcutter" Rail Gun are impressively garbage even for the game line, doing vastly less damage than a normal rail gun, but still having a strength requirement! Why bother? Similarly, the ATA P-20/50 Variable Frequency Sniper Rifle is like the Juicer rifle from the corebook; which is to say, does awful damage and won't help you score any sweet headshots.


no seriously is this ironic I don't even know anymore

Next, we get Outback Armor or "homespun" armor, which is a long list of different S.D.C. and M.D.C. armors salvaged together. The real weakness of mega-damage homespun armor is that it has an Armor Rating - a mechanic from other Palladium games where if you roll higher than an armor's armor rating, you bypass it. Now, the intent is somewhat clear- it makes normal weapons potentially useful when fighting Roadgangers or the like, but it makes this armor potential suicide against mega-damage weapons, since one bad roll can kill you outright. It's interesting to see this book play with a lower tech level, but on a practical play level there are some definite issues (on top of the usual issues mega-damage presents), particularly with the fact most of the Outback player characters only start with homespun armor.


The tragedy of skull-free fascism.

In any case, that leads us into High-Tech M.D.C. Body Armor produced by the tech-cities, though they've trickled out into the Outback sometimes though theft or loss. Base-4 Armored Clothing is the new technology presented here, a mega-damage cloth that can pass for clothing. Though it barely really provides much protection, and only mainly against energy weapons. Physical weapons still deal some S.D.C. damage due to the non-rigid nature of the protection even though logically they should smoosh you inside like a grape in a bag. However, sometimes it's made into an M.D.C. Trenchcoat with plates for crappy-but-better protection (hilariously, the helmet can have twice as much protection as the coat), or reinforced with an concealed M.D.C. Light Anti-Assassin Vest that provides some extra torso protection. Similarly, the M.D.C. Flak Vest and Police M.D.C. Armored Jump Suit provide only nominal protection.


Remember those horrific penalties on using a shield to block bullets? He doesn't.

It's not until the Police & TRG M.D.C. Riot Armor (55 M.D.C.), Special Ops Heavy Combat Armor (115 M.D.C., and "Trencher" Body Armor (70 M.D.C.) pop up that we start to see more conventional M.D.C. armor like we see in the rest of the game line, highly prized by outsiders (and by definition, most player characters).


And shotgun design is timeless throughout the centuries.

Overall, it's interesting to see them try something different, but it leads to binary situations where confrontations with M.D.C. weapons or with M.D.C. creatures can be highly lethal, and gives a big advantage to PCs playing supernatural types like Kwarla (who are mega-damage themselves and don't need constant repairs). There are no real tips on how to adjudicate this, sadly. I appreciate Lucas really trying to do something different and create more of a post-apocalypse feeling, at the same time how mega-damage works just makes the whole thing potentially unfun for players. Well, even more unfun than usual, anyway!

Next: How to be a post-apocalypse Ned Kelly.

Ghost Leviathan
Mar 2, 2017

Exploration is ill-advised




Ronwayne posted:

GM's having little obsessions related to their interests outside gaming can either make a game great or really really obnoxious.

The trick is to make games based entirely on your interests.

occamsnailfile
Nov 4, 2007



zamtrios so lonely

Grimey Drawer

Cythereal posted:

It's been a thing for a while, and popped up in the dwarf army codices. The dwarfs in general practice polyandry because something like nine in ten dwarf births are sons. Marrying is a mark of high status for dwarfs - being rejected for marriage is one of the more common reasons to take the Slayer Oath, and it's more about status and family politics than about what humans would recognize as marriage. Almost all dwarf women are married to several men, and they generally have absolute power in those relationships and have the final say in whether to wed a given man or not.

Dwarfen population decline in Warhammer Fantasy is suggested to mostly be about how suicidal dwarf honor is than about fertility per se. But when a hold is overrun, every woman lost is a blow felt by the entire race.

A goodly chunk of dwarfs never see a dwarf woman except from afar. You'd think this might lead to homosexuality being widespread among the dwarfs, but as far as I know that's never been suggested or explored.

If I were going to take the fantasy-race angle to this, I'd say the dwarves don't have a lustful concept of sexuality the way that humans do--marriage is, as mentioned, about status and family politics and the production of more labor for the state. Male dwarves getting busy would be a waste of good working hours and breakups are a source of yet more grudges. We think of sex as a fundamental need because we are human, perhaps the dwarves just don't really experience it that way.

Gay dwarfing it up is also cool, and I am amused that the books blame dwarven population decline on toxic masculinity rather than women failing to have enough babies. (Though really, nine to one, that's...that's not a good ratio unless dwarves are born in litters to their centuries long lives.)

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


So, almost every Lore spell is going to take anyone but the best wizards multiple turns to cast reliably, huh? Those CNs are way higher than I was expecting from the original description of magic.

E: This is why they made Collegiate Magi okay at hand to hand now, isn't it? They're meant to use their melee weapon and petty spells most of the time, then occasionally stand there screaming for 3 turns like a DBZ character and throw out some real magic? Though looking at it that seems like it will change around to the Collegiate Mage eventually breaking action economy in the other direction, pulling out powerful spells with Instinctive Diction/War Wizard and then also stabbing someone.

Night10194 fucked around with this message at 13:30 on Sep 22, 2018

psudonym55
Nov 22, 2014


Advantage built from either casting low CN spells or from hand to hand now that they are ok at it does enable you to potentially cast some of the reasonably high CN spells.
Gotta make sure to hit the enemy spellcasters every so often.

LatwPIAT
Jun 6, 2011

Do I need a title?

Ghost Leviathan posted:

The trick is to make games based entirely on your interests.

BRB making a game about playing kickass GSM action heroines solving computer crime in space.

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


Ghost Leviathan posted:

The trick is to make games based entirely on your interests.

I mean, this is why religion comes up so much in the games I run.

DalaranJ
Apr 15, 2008

Yosuke will now die for you.


Alien Rope Burn posted:


no seriously is this ironic I don't even know anymore

Ha ha ha, "Okay, but if we designed this high caliber gun so it can only be fired while braced against the user's abdomen?"

Alien Rope Burn
Dec 4, 2004

I wanna be a saikyo HERO!


I know Rifts pays no attention to what the recoil of a mega-damage rail gun would actually be like, but I can only imagine that weapon making hamburger helper out of your guts.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



WFRP 4e - Why Is Everyone On Fire

Lore of Fire spells draw on the Bright Wind, Aqshy, and they are...not subtle. Ever. You may choose to inlict +1 Ablaze condition on anyone targeted by spells of the Lore of Fire, unless they also have the Arcane Magic (Fire) Talent. Further, every Ablaze condition within WBP yards gives +10 to any attempts to Channel or cast Lore of Fire spells. Ingredients tend to be either extremely flammble ones immolated during casting, such as coil, oil, fats and woods, or things immune to fire, such as iron keys, carved parts of fire grate or small oven stones.
Aqshy's Aegis (CN 5): You wrap yourself in a cloak of Aqshy for WPB Rounds, making you totally immune to damage from non-magical fire, including monstrous breath attacks, and you ignore any Ablaze conditions you would receive. You also get the Ward (9+) creature trait against magical fire attacks for the duration - including spells from the Lore of Fire.
Cauterise (CN 4): 1 target you touch heals 1d10 Wounds and loses all Bleeding conditions, and any remaining wounds will not become infected. However, targets withine the Arcane Magic (Fire) talent must make a Cool test or scream in agony. If they fail by -6 or more SLs, they become Unconscious for 1d10 hours and are permanently scarred.
Crown of Flame (CN 9): You grow a fiery crown for WBP Rounds. For the duration, you have the Fear 1 trait and +1 War Leader talent, and you get +10 on all tests to channel or cast Lore of Fire spells. For every +2 SLs, you may increase your Fear value by 1 or take War Leader one more time.
Flaming Hearts (CN 8): You call forth fiery passion, targeting a point within WP yards. All allies within an AOE of WPB yards of that point lose all Broken and Fatigued conditions, and for WPB rounds they get +1 Drilled, Fearless and Stout-hearted Talents.
Firewall (CN 6): You call forth a wall of flame within WP yards for WPB Rounds. It is WPB yards wide ande 1 yard deep. For every +2 SLs, you may extend its length another +WPB yards. Anyone crossing the firewall suffers a +(WPB) Damage magic missile and gains 1 Ablaze condition.
Great Fires of U'Zhul (CN 10): You hurl an immense fiery blast at 1 target within wP yards. This is a Damage +10 magic missile that ignores APs and causes +2 Ablaze conditions and Prone. Anyone within an AOE of WPB yards of the target suffers a Damage +5 hit that ignores APs and must make a Dodge test or gain +1 Ablaze condition. For WPB yards after that, anyone that is in the AOE at the start of a round suffers 1d10+6 Damage that ignnores APS and gains +1 Ablaze condition as the fires continue to burn.
Flaming Sword of Rhuin (CN 8): You wreath 1 sword within WP yards in magical flame for WPB Rounds. For the duration, the weapon has Damage +6 and the Impact Quality, and anyone struck by it gains +1 Ablaze condition. Any wielder that does not have the Arcane Magic (Fire) Talent that fumbles an attack with the blade also gains +1 Ablaze condition.
Purge (CN 10): You call forth intense flame to burn away the taint and corruption in AOE of WPB yards centered on a target point within WP yards. Anything flammable is set on fire and any creatures in the area get +SL Ablaze conditions. For WPB rounds, any Corrupting Influence in the area, such as Dhar, warpstone or Chaos-tainted objects, will smolder and blacken, starting to burn. You may maintain the spell for subsequent rounds with a Channeling test. The GM determines how long it takes to destroy a specific Corrupting Influence, but as a rough guide, an acorn of warpstone or a minor Chaos-tainted object may take (10-WPB) Rounds, minimum 1, a fist-sized chunk of Warpstone or more potent Chaos-tainted object takes double. A powerful Chaos Artifact may take hours or longer.

Lore of Heavens spells draw on the Blue Wind, Azyr. Lore of Heavens spells that cause Damage ignore APS from metal armor, and arc to all other targets in 2 yards that do not have the Arcane Magic (Heavens) talent, dealing damage as a +WPB Damage magic missile. Seers can get to access to Arcane Magic (Heavens), but unless they become Wizards, they can only learn Fate's Fickle Fingers, Starcrossed and the Portents of Amul - no other spells, even Arcane spells. Common ingredients include astronomical instruments, charts, lenses or symbols, along with those associated with augury, such as animal innards, mirrors, glass balls or bird tongues. Wind-based spells may use wings or feathers, while electricity-based ones commonly use slivers of carved metal.
Ceruluan Shield (CN 7): You encase yourself in an electrical shield for WPB rounds, gaining +SL APs to all locations against melee attacks. If attacked by metal weapons, like a dagger, sword, or metal-tipped spear, the attacker takes +WPB Damage.
Comet of Casandora (CN 10): You call forth to the heavens, calling down a comet to target one point within I yards. At the end of the round, you must make a Perception test. For every +1 SL, you may move the point of impact IB yards. For every -SL, the GM will move the point of impact IB yards in a random direction. Next Round, the comet strikes, hitting everyone within an AOE IB yards of the point of impact with a Damage +12 magic missile and causing +1 Ablaze condition and Prone.
Fate's Fickle Fingers (CN 6): All allies within an AOE of IB yards, centered on you, except those with the Arcane Magic (Heavens) talent, pool their Fortune Points for WPB Rounds. Anyone who is part of the pool may draw on it, first come, first served. When the spell ends, all remaining Fortune Points are reallocated as fairly as possible, with you deciding who is shafted if it can't be totally equal.
Starcrossed (CN 7): Pick 1 target foe within WP yards. For IB rounds, you may spend Fortune Points to force them to reroll tests.
T'Essla's Arc (CN 7): You fire a bolt of lightning at 1 target within WP yards, as a Damage +10 magic missile that causes +1 Blinded condition.
The First Portent of Amul (CN 3): You gain +1 Fortune Point, +1 more per +2 SLs. After IB Rounds, any unused points granted this way are lost.
The Second Portent of Amul (CN 6): You gain +SL Fortune Points, +1 per +2 SLs. After IB rounds, any unused points granted this way are lost.
The Third Portent of Amul (CN 12): You get +1 Fate Point. If you do not spend it by the end of IB Rounds, it is lost.

Lore of Metal spells draw on the Gold Wind, Chamon., and tend to be accompanied by golden light, heat and extreme danger for anyone who's wearing metal and fighting the Gold Wizard. Damage from Lore of Metal spells ignores APs from metal armor and get bonus Damage equal to the APs of metal rmor that are worn on any hit location struck. Further, you can wear metal armor. Ingredients commonly include heavy metals of any type, usually inlaid and carved intricately, or are related to objects of the forge, such as bellows marked with formulae, inscribed anvil chunks or furnace fragments.
Crucible of Chamon (CN 7): You channel power into 1 target non-magical metal object within WPB yards, such as a weapon or piece of armor. It melts, dropping to the floor and cooling near-instantly. If held, the item is dropped. If worn, the wearer suffers a Damage +WPB magic missile that ignores TB. The object is destroyed, but the metal retains its base value and is perfectly usable by a smith.
Enchant Weapon (CN 6): You encase 1 non-magical weapon you touch with bands of Chamon, strengthening it for WPB Rounds. For the duration, it is Magical, gets +wPB to its Damage and gains the Unbreakable Quality. For every +3 SLs, you may add 1 Quality or remove 1 Flaw for the duration.
Feather of Lead (CN 5): You call on the weight of density on a target point within WP yards. For WPB Rounds, everyone in an AOE of WPB yards around that point is either Encumbered or not Encumbered, period, no matter what - you choose which one is applied to everyone.
Fool's Gold (CN 4): You touch 1 non-magical metal object, altering its alchemical nature. For WP minutes, all metal in the object becomes gold - true, transformed gold, not an illusion. This can ruin good weapons, make armor too heavy, or turn lead coins into gold ones temporarily, with any spot effects left to the GM to figure out mechanically.
Forge of Chamon (CN 9): You alter the quality of 1 target metal item within WPB yards. For WP minutes, it gains 1 Quality of your choice or loses 1 Flaw of your choice. For every +2 SLs, you may add another Quality or remove another Flaw.
Glittering Robe (CN 5): You create a whirling field of Chamon around yourself for TB Rounds. For the duration, you gain the Ward (9+) creature trait agianst all attacks and spells that target you. Any hit you successfully prevent this way increases the Ward's effectiveness by 1, to a max of Ward (3+).
Mutable Metal (CN 5): You touch 1 non-magical object made of metal, warming it. For WPB Rounds, you may bend and mangle it with a Strength test at +20, or may make more complex alterations with a relevant Trade test at +20, using only your hands.
Transmutation of Chamon (CN 12): You call forth the power from metals worn by your foes and the earth. You target one point within WP yards, turning the flesh of all targets within an AOE of WPB yards of that point into metal very briefly. This is a Damage +WPB magic missile that ignores TB and causes +1 Blinded, Deafened and Stunned conditions, all of which cannot be removed for WPB Rounds. All affected targets get +1 AP to all locations due to the gold wrapped around their bodies, but also suffer from suffocation. If they die while the spell is still going, they are permanently locked in a shell of base metal.

Lore of Life spells draw on the Jade Wind, Ghyran, and tend to involve green light and natural phenomena given supernatural power. You get +10 to casting and channeling rolls in rural or wilderness environments. Any living targets of Arcane spells from the Lore of Life lose all Fatigued and Bleeding conditions after any other effects are applies. Targets with the Undead trait take +WPB Damage that ignores TB and APs whenever affected by any Lore of Life spell. Ingredients commonly involve rare seeds or nuts, the humours of sentient creatures, rare tree saps, fertile loam, spring waters and various plants or small animals.
Barkskin (CN 3): 1 target you touch gains skin hard and rough as tree bark for WPB Rounds, getting +2 TB but -10 to Agility and Dexterity.
Earthblood (CN 6): You must be in direct contact with the earth to use this, such as standing barefoot on it. For WPB Rounds, any creatures in direct contact with the earth within an AOE of WPB yards, centered on you, heal WPB Wounds at the start of each Round.
Earthpool (CN 8): You vanish into the ground in a torrent of Ghyran. You appear at the start of the next Round at any point within WP yards, erupting violently from the earth. For every +2 SLs you may increase the distance you travel by WP yards. Any enemies engaged by you when you reappear gain the Surprised condition. This does not allow you to move through solid stone, but does allow you to move through water.
Fat of the Land (CN 4): 1 target you touch need not eat or drink for WPB days. They do, however, explicitly still poop and piss, but it's bright green.
Forest of Thorns (CN 6): You target a patch of earth within wP yards, which can be quite small. An immense knot of spiked vines and brambles bursts forth from it to cover an AOE of WPB yards centered on the point for WPB rounds. While this is active, anyone attempting to traverse the AOE on foot without having the Arcane Magic (Life) talent must make an Agility test at -20 or get +1 Bleeding condition and +1 Entangled condition, with Strength equal to your WP. When the spell ends, the growth remains but loses its supernatural properties - it's just normal brambles and vines.
Lie of the Land (CN 5): You touch the earth and let your senses flow through it. After communing for 1 full minute, you receive a detailed mental map of the landscape within IB miles, shjowing all natural features (such as land, forest and rivers) but not any settlements, except in the form of cleared terrain or dug trenches. Every range increase with SLs increases the time taken communing by 1 minute.
Lifebloom (CN 8): You flood a blighted or desolate are with Ghur, targeting a dry riverbed, well, field or blighted animal within WPB yards. The target bursts back to life. A dry river flows, a dry or polluted well is clean and resh, a field, vineyard or orchard bursts to life, with all crops immediately reaching full ripeness, and a sick of unproductive animal becomes healthy, productive and free of disease.
Regenerate (CN 6): 1 target you touch gains the Regenerate creature trait for WPB rounds, which is probably the most efficient single-target combat healing in the game.

Lore of Light spells wield the White Wind, Hysh, and usually involve blinding white light or waves of radiant purity. You may choose to inflict +1 Blinded condition on the targets of Lore of Light spells unless they have the Arcane Magic (Light) talent. Further, any target of a Lore of Light spell with the Daemonic or Undead traits suffers an additional hit of +IntB Damage, ignoring TB and APs. Ingredients usually involve holy artifacts or things associated with holy places, as well as crystals, glass, pyramidions and small statues, carved with sacred symbols, snakes or moral tales. White candles, silver carvings and bleached paper are also common.
Banishment (CN 12): You send out a cleansing halo of magic, affected all creatures within an AOE of WPB yards centered on you whose T is lower than your WP. Targets with the Undead or Daemonic traits gain the Unstable trait. If they already had it, they drop to 0 Wounds.
Blinding Light (CN 5): You emit a blinding flash that extends out WP yards. Anyone in range that is looking at you and doesn't have the Arcane Magic (Light) talent gets +SL Blinded conditions.
Clarity of Thought (CN 6): 1 target you touch has their mind calmed for Int minutes. For the duration, they ignore all negative modifiers on their throught process, whether from conditions, mental mutations. Psychology or any other source.
Daemonbane (CN 10): You call forth a blast of Hysh against 1 target within WPB yards. Your casting test is opposed by the target's WP. If you win, you utterly obliterate a target with the Daemonic trait in a flash of blinding light, returning it to to whence it came. If you successfully banish a Daemon this way, anyone looking at your target that does not have the Arcane Magic (Light) talent gets +SLs Blinded conditions.
Healing Light (CN 9): You heal 1 target within WPB yards of IntB+WPB Wounds. They glow with a bright, cleansing light, equivalent to a campfire, and if they pass an Endurance test at -20, they lose 1 Corruption Point that they gained within the last half hour.
Net of Amyntok (CN 8): You cast forth a delicate net over the mind of 1 target within IntB yards. They get +1 Stunned condition that cannot be removed for IntB Rounds. To recover from the condition after, they must test Int instead of Endurance. Targets with the Bestial trait are immune.
Pha's Protection (CN 10): You call forth an aura of pure light, extending out in an AOE of WPB yards centered on you for WPB Rounds. Any creature with the Undead or Daemonic traits, with mutations or with more Corruption than their WPB+TB combined cannot enter the AOE. Any already within the AOE gain the Broken condition until they leave. Anyone within the AOE may not gain Corruption Points for the duration.
Speed of Thought (CN 8): You get +20 Int and I for WPB Rounds.

Lore of Shadows spells wield the Grey Wind, Ulgu, are subtle and sly, and they can be merely muttered stealthily rather than having to be obviously chanted. Their spells typically involve shadows and smoke or insubstantiality. Any Lore of Shadows spells that cause Damage ignore any non-magical APs. Ingredients often include anything used to hide, shroud or conceal, such as cosmetics, perfumes, scarfs, glasses, mirrors or wigs. Items involved in professions of wisdom or intrigue are also common, such as diplomatic symbols, symbols of rank and blades, the ultimate expression of power.
Choking Shadows (CN 6): You wrap Ulgu tendrils around the neck of 1 foe within WPB yards. For WPB rounds, assuming they need to breathe, they get +1 Fatigued condition, cannot talk and are subject to suffocation.
Doppelganger (CN 10): You assume the appearance of another humanoid creature with whom you are familiar for IntB minutes. You automatically fool anyone without the Second Sight talent, though they may note that some of your mannerisms are somewhat off. Those with Second Sight must make a Perception test at -10 to notice your disguise, and they still can't see through the spell unless they Dispel it.
Illusion (CN 8): You create an illusory image centered on a point within WP yards that covers an AOE of IB yards, showing any image you choose. It automatically fools anyone without the Second Sight talent, and those with that must make a PErception test at -10 to notice. Even if they do, they can't see through it unless they Dispel it. By default the illusion is static. As an Action during the duration, you may make a Channeling test for -20 to make it move for the Round.
Mindslip (CN 6): You call forth Ulgu in the mind of 1 target within 1 yard, erasing all prior memory of you for WP minutes. Once the spell ends, the target must make a +20 Int test, or the memory loss is permanent until Dispelled.
Mystifying Miasma (CN 6): You call forth a mass of mist and shadow, making an AOE of WPB yards centered on a point within WP yards for WPB Rounds. Anyone within the AOE that doesn't have the ARcane Magic (Shadows) talent gets +1 Blinded, Deafened and Fatigued conditions, which last for the duration. Anyone affected that attempts to move must make a Perception test or become Prone. If the spell is Dispelled, anyone affected must make an Initiative test at +40 ot gain +1 Stunned condition.
Shadowsteed (CN 6): You all forth a shadowy steed within WPB yards of you. Its unnatural flesh is black as midnight and it appears at times to be both solid and insubstantial. It uses the stats of a riding horse and lasts until the next sunrise. When out of sunlight, the steed gains the Dark Vision. Ethereal, Magical, Painless, Stealthy, Stride, Fear 1 and Ward (9+) creature traits. It can be ridden even while insubstantial, and any rider with Arcane Magic (Shadow) gets +20 to related Ride tests. Any rider without gets -20 to related Ride tests. Shadowsteeds never tire and need no rest, but at the first rays of dawn they melt away into mist. Anyone still riding them when the spell ends or when it is Dispelled suffers falling damage.
Shadowstep (CN 8): You create a shadowy portal of Ulgu, disappearing and reappearing at any other point within wP yards. Any enemies Engaged by you when you vanish or reappear gain the Surprised condition.
Shroud of Invisibility (CN 8): You wrap 1 target you touch in Ulgu. For WPB rounds, they are invisible and imperceptible to all mundane vision, automatically fooling anyone without Second Sight. Those with the Second Sight talent must make a Perception test to notice someone is nearby, and even then they can't get a precise location unless they Dispel this. However, the target remains perceptible to other senses, and the spell automatically ends if they draw attention to themself, such as by making loud noises or attacking someone.

Next time: Witchcraft

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


It's hilarious to see Doppleganger made into an extremely hard to cast spell, considering the Journeyman Grey Wizard turned Hunter in my current campaign uses it as his bread and butter for doing Grey Wizard things. It used to be much more general, too; he'll use it to do things like look like a Chaos Warrior because that doesn't require him to talk, anyway.

Grey Wizards are really good for adventures.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



The thing about the high CNs is that while they are harder to cast, they are also, simultaneously, much easier to use than the hard-to-cast spells in 2e, because even a starting tier 2 wizard can just channel their way into it. It just takes a bit of time and risk of miscast. (Also, what counts as 'familiar' is up to the GM, so you could kill a random bandit or Chaos warrior and just use their form for a while by taking a few minutes to study them if the GM says so.)

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


Considering at T2 your risk of a miscast is 9%-The Tens Digit of Your TN and you might have to be casting for quite awhile to pull off CN 10 at T2 (with what, a 40-50 TN for Channeling on average at that level?) that isn't an inconsiderable risk, if I'm reading the rules properly.

Can you take multiple ranks of Attunement? That would probably help a lot.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



You can! Up to IB purchases. Also keep in mind that any crit on Channeling is instantly Enough, at the cost of a minor miscast.

E: which is why the Wizard is hands down the best caster class - they get real early Aethyric Attunement access.

Mors Rattus fucked around with this message at 16:23 on Sep 22, 2018

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



WFRP 4e - I Got Better

Lore of Hedgecraft is seen by its users as a gift from the gods, and they name themselves the Blessed Few. Due to their ancient traditions and ingrained beliefs, their spells cannot becase without ingredients, period. However, they do get the effects of using their ingredients...and more important, their ingredients are much, much easier to get than Color Magic ingredients. They are typically herbas and plants, easily found on the fringes of settlements. You can find them with a foraging test using Lore (Herbalism), or you can buy them for 5p apiece. Ingredients are easily sourced, then prepared to exacting standards - stuff like the wings of a dragonfly killed with a silver pin, the rods of a poplar polished with beeswax on a specific day, or bones buried under a hedgerow for a month in winter. (Remember: Arcane spells can be taken as Lore of Hedgecraft spells, so these aren't all they have.)
Goodwill (CN 0): You create an AOE of FelB yards, centered on you, which encourages friendliness and good cher for WPB Rounds. All Fellowship tests made within the AOE get +10, and Animosity and Hatred Psychologies have no effect in the AOE.
Mirkride (CN 0): You project your spirit from your form, into the Hedge, the space between material and spirit worlds, for WPB minutes. For the duration, you stand apart from the world, able to witness it invisibly but unable to affect it in any way. You can move through any physical impediments and can walk through non-magical obstacles at will. Your body remains in place, immobile and insensate, for the duration. At the end of the spell, you are yanked back into it automatically. If your body is killed while you're gone, however, your spirit is trapped in the Hedge to wander eternally.
Nepenthe (CN 0): You speak words of power over a premade potion of herbs, transforming it with a touch. If drunk within WPB Rounds, the drinker may choose to completely forget a single individual permanently.
Nostrum (CN 0): You speak words of power over a premade potion of herbs, transforming it with a touch. If drunk within WPB Rounds, the drinker heals WPB Wounds and is cured of one disease, plus one more disease per +2 SLs. This is probably the easiest multi-wound healing in the game, but the cost is Witch Hunters.
Part the Branches (CN 0): For WP minutes, your pupils dilate and you are able to see into the Spirit world, perceiving invisible beings, spirits and Daemons, even if they are noted as impossible to see.
Protective Charm (CN 0): You imbue a charm with a spell of protection with a touch. For WPB days, anyone bearing the charm gains the Magic Resistance Talent. IF they already have it, the charm does nothing.

Lore of Witchcraft spells grab whatever winds happen to be around, making it pretty pure Dhar magic. Each time a spell of the Lore of Witchcraft rolls on the Miscast tabkesm the caster gets 1 Corruption Point on top of normal results. You may inflict 1 Bleeding Condition on anyone targeted by a Lore of Witchcraft spell. Lastly, unless you use an ingredient, you always have to roll on the Minor Miscast table when casting or channeling Lore of Witchcraft spells, and ingredients provide no benefit if you roll a normal Miscast. Fortunately, ingredients of the Lore of Witchcraft are extremely cheap - they cost (Spell's CN)p, not shillings, and can be found with a foraging roll using Outdoor Survival. Ingredients are usually a disgusting mix of animal body parts harvested from living animals, herbs and gross leavings. Lizard eyes, dog toes and donkey gizzard are common, among others.
Blight (CN 14): You target one well, field or domestic animal within WPB yards. A blighted well becomes brackish and stagnant. A blighted field's crops rot overnight. A blighted animal sickens, produces nothing of value and will die in (10-SLs) days.
Creeping Menace (CN 6): You summon a swarm of slithering, creeping creatures to harass one target within WP yards for WPB Rounds. All targets affected are immediately engaged by a swarm of Giant Rats, Giant Spiders or Snakes, using the standard profiles for such creat ures but with the Swarm trait. On your action, you may make a Charm Animal test to direct one or more swarms to attack a different target. When the spell ends, any remaining swarms disappear into shadow.
Curse of Crippling Pain (CN 10): You stab a crude representation (a doll or puppet), targeting 1 person within WP yards. Choose a hit location to curse with pain for WPB Rounds. If leg, the leg is treated as if Amputated, and if the target was running, they become Prone and take falling damage. If arm, the arm is treated as if Amputated, and anything held in that hand is dropped. If body, the target gains +1 Fatigued condition from agony and must make an Endurance test at -20 or become Prone. If Head, the target gains +1 Stunned condition and must make an Endurance test at +20 or become Unconscious for the duration. While the spell is active, you may make a Channeling test as an Action to restab the doll and select a different location.
Curse of Ill Fortune (CN 8): The ingredient for this spell must be something belonging to the target or from their body. You target 1 person within WPB miles. For WPB days, the target suffers bad luck in the form of all kinds of minor narrative inconvenience and -10 to all tests after all other modifiers, and they cannot spend Fortune points.
Haunting Horror (CN 8): You touch a single location, such as a house or clearing, causing all within the cursed location to suffer haunting dreams and waking nightmares for WP days. Those who enter the area during the duration are unnerved by eerie sensations, flitting shadows and whispered voices on the edge of hearing. Unless they have the Arcane Magic (Witchcraft) talent, they get +1 Fatigued condition, and must make a Cool test or gain another +1 Fatigued and +1 Broken condition, both of which are only removed by leaving the location.
The Evil Eye (CN 6): You lock eyes with a single target that must be looking at you, within WP yards. You make an opposed Intimidate test against their Cool, adding any SLs from your casting roll to the result. The target gets +1 Fatigued condition per +2 SLs by which you win. If you win by 6+ SLs, they also gain +1 Broken condition.

Lore of Daemonology is a Dark Magic lore, and therefore any caster can grab it on top of their normal Arcane Magic lore. It is focused on summoning, binding and controlling Daemons, and is extremely dangerous to the soul, putting it at dark risk of the Ruinous Powers and their influence. And yeah, it's Dhar.
Destroy Lesser Daemon (CN 6): You target one Daemon within WP rounds, tearing at the Dhar that holds their form together and drawing it back into yourself. A target with the Daemonic trait and lower WP than you suffers WPB Wounds, ignoring TB and APs, and you increase one stat of your choice by +10 for WPB Rounds.
Detect Daemon (CN 4): You automatically know if there is a manifested Daemon within WP yards, whether it's summoned, bound in an artifact, possessing someone or otherwise.
Manifest Lesser Daemon (CN 8): You channel a flow of Dhar, briefly tearing a hole in the flow of reality. A Lesser Daemon immedilatey manifests for WPB Rounds, within WPB yards of you. You perform a Channel (Dhar) test against its WP, and if you win, it will obey one command you issue (which it takes as literally as possible), then vanish. (If the Duration ends before it completes the command, it vanishes anyway.) If you fail, it attacks you. Lesser Daemons have two examples in the back of the book - a Bloodletter and a Daemonette.
Octagram (CN 10): You create an octagram on the floor, marked with unholy symbols, no more than WPB yards across. For wP minutes, anything with the Daemonic trait cannot enter or leave the octagram uniless their WP is more than twice yours.

Lore of Necromancy is a Dark Magic lore as well. It is focused on mastering death and immortality.
Raise Dead (CN 8): You channel a flow of Dhar into the earth within wP yards. SL+1 Skeletons claw forth from area of WPB yards around the target point at the end of the Round, organized as you prefer within the AOE. They start Prone. They are entirely under your control and can perform simple commands. At sunrise, if you die or if you become Unconscious, the spell ends and the summoned Skeletons collapse. For every +2 SLs, you may summon another SL Skeletons.
Reanimate (CN 8): You target a number of dead bodies within an AOE of WPB yards around a point within wP yards. You raise WPB+SL bodies as Zombies or Skeletons (depending on how intact they are). They start Prone, and are entirely under your control, able to obey simple commands. At sunrise, if you die or if you become Unconscious, the spell ends and the corpses fall dead once more. For every +2 SLs, you may raise an extra WPB+SL Skeletons or Zombies. (The reason to do Raise Dead over this is that you need bodies on hand for this.)
Screaming Skull (CN 8): You shriek high-pitched words, calling forth a large black skull covered in green-purple flame, which flies fowards for WP yards, screaming and cackling. It moves in a straight line, following the counters of the land and passing through any obstacles in its way. It is a Damgae +WPB magic missile affected only targets without the Undead trait. Anyone who takes Wounds from it must make a Cool test or get +1 Broken condition.
Vanhel's Call (CN 6): You call forth a complex flow of Dhar into up to IntB Undead targets within WP yards. Each Undead target gains your choice of a free Move or Action, though all must receive the same thing, the moment the spell is cast. For every +2 SLs, you may target an extra IntB Undead.

Chaos Magic has three Lores - Khorne does not like magic and offers no Lore of his own. The core book only provides one spell for each of the three primary Chaos Lores, to add flavor to Chaos Cultists on top of Arcane Spells and Lore of Daemonology.
Lore of Nurgle spreads disease and filth by mixing the excesses of the Jade Wind with corruption.
Stream of Corruption (CN 9): Your mouth distends horribly and you vomit forth a stream of filth. Make a Breaht attack as if you had spent 2 Advantage to activate the Breath trait. It is a Damage +TB magic missile that ignores APs and has the Corruption and Poison traits of Breath. If any target takes more than their TB in Wounds, they must make an Endurance test or contract Blood Rot. For every +2 SLs, you may increase Damage by +2.
Lore of Slaanesh brings torture and excess, mixing Amethyst, Gold and Jade Winds into a perverse and twisted whole.
Acquiescence (CN 5): You target one person within WP yards. For WPB Rounds, they are dropped to 10 I if that is higher than their current I, as their mind turns inwards. For the duration, on their Turn, their movement is randomized by the GM as they bemoan life and lewdly tell all what should have been. They can only perform an Action if they make a Cool test; if they fail, they are too busy bemoaned what might have been.
Lore of Tzeentch focuses on bringing change and can be quite powerful due to Tzeentch's master of Magic, Treachery and Lies. It draws heavily on Grey, Amethyst and Bright Winds.
Treason of Tzeentch (CN 6): You target one person within WP yards, channeling treachery into their mind. For WPB Rounds, they can no longer use Talents or Skills when making skill tests, rolling only against unmodified stats.

Next time: The GM Section

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


Witchcraft seems like it really sucks, considering all the penalties and the fact that the class for it is generally shittier than real wizards.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



It totally does! At least Hedgecraft spells are super easy to cast.

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


Meanwhile, we're experimenting with an actual serious Witch/Vikti in 2e and it's a massive EXP sink, but you'd be amazed how useful of a lore you can build out of CN 15 or lower spells. That gets you poo poo like Banishment in 2e. Or Doppleganger. Or Fireball. Throw in a Familiar that gives +1 Mag and you've got a surprisingly useful adventurer with a cobbled together (if expensive and dangerous) lore. Also, 200 EXP per spell is a lot easier to pay than a permanent Fate-esque resource.

Like, I don't get what they were going for with the 4e Witch. There's a thing in 2e that the 'unsanctioned' human mages (who haven't fully given in to Chaos magic) don't go higher than Mag 2 because they don't really have tutors (and because it's hilarious to see the Warlock sneer about how great he is when he's barely a Journeyman) or anything to teach them, but that doesn't fit in as well with everyone having 4 tiers. You'd think they'd have something special or cool to make up for being hell of illegal and their magic being more dangerous, but they just seem way, way shittier than College Mages in every way.

At least Daemonology has the nice hook/lure of 'Sure it's dark magic but you can use some of it really well to kill or ward against demons', that's a reasonable temptation to players to risk it.

Night10194 fucked around with this message at 17:07 on Sep 22, 2018

wiegieman
Apr 22, 2010

Royalty is a continuous cutting motion




drat, necromancy can crank out a ton of skeletons and or zombies and then give them free attacks. Those guys are scary now.

ChaseSP
Mar 25, 2013



Love the giant flaming cackling skull missile.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Night10194
Feb 13, 2012

We'll start,
like many good things,
with a bear.


wiegieman posted:

drat, necromancy can crank out a ton of skeletons and or zombies and then give them free attacks. Those guys are scary now.

They could always do that once they got the Lore of the Vampires in Night's Dark Masters; it was only core-book Necromancy that was kind of disappointing.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply