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Serf
May 5, 2011




Literally just replace the name "bow" with "gun" and that solves every problem.

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Serf
May 5, 2011




I remember reading an Alien novel I bought in a Goodwill in highschool that was about scientists getting royal jelly (??) from the xenomorphs using shields that made them invisible to them.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Halloween Jack posted:

God, why do irritating libertarians have to be so good at science fiction?

boy, that's one broad definition of "good"

Serf
May 5, 2011




JcDent posted:

What does Shadow of Demon Lord do to limit mages?

I guess this should be a reminder to me to finish my F&F of the game because magic is the next section.

But in a nutshell, the game limits magic through giving casters small numbers of spells and giving those spells strict mechanical limits that don't allow them to have an inordinate impact on the narrative. 5th-level spells are powerful, but are almost all combat spells, and you will almost always only get one of them with one casting per rest. The vast majority of spells require a roll, and your castings of higher-level spells are pretty restricted. There's no "I win" spells, and you'll never be as consistent a damage dealer as a martial character. Most all-magic builds are about the gimmick your Path gives you. For instance, the Sorcerer is all about exploding with power after juicing themselves up, so you want to get in close to the fight and push that damage into your enemies. So one potential route there would be to specialize in Destruction magic (damage spells that cause you harm in the process) and picking up the Destroyer Master Path, which gives you even more self-explody power that you can form into beams.

But for instance the top-level Destruction spell is Disintegrate, which deals 6 damage to the caster in exchange for making a Will attack against a target's Agility. If you succeed, they take 9d6 damage and are killed instantly if that attack incapacitates them (when damage equals total health). That's pretty strong, sure. But let's say you're fighting a Master-level enemy like the typical Dragon. They have 160 Health, an Agility of 13, and Spell Defense, which causes spells attacking them to deal half damage, and attackers take 1 bane to spell attacks. Attacking Agility is way better than attacking Defense (dragons have 23 Defense), but that attack roll is gonna have 1 bane to it. So if you pump your Will up as much as you can, you might have like a +5 to the roll, but that bane is -1d6. That can be mitigated by using your Sorcerer talent to take on strain and give yourself a boon, but that puts you at risk of exploding (not all bad if you're in close with the dragon). So your damage is gonna top out at 27 (half because of the Spell Defense trait), but that's super rare. Using Spell Recovery from the Magician you could potentially use Disintegrate 3 times in a day, but the self-damage will quickly outpace the healing and even then you're not going to take down the dragon by yourself.

By comparison, in one Master-level playtest I ran, the fighter character was doing between 5d6 and 8d6 damage per swing, and the technomancer summoned an Iron Man suit that let them swing twice per round for 2d6+1. Both of those would not be halved by the dragon's Spell Defense, and have a lot more mileage than a level 5 spell.

Of course this Magician/Sorcerer/Destroyer isn't going to be totally useless in a dragon fight either. They have other spells, and even though Spell Defense will halve their damage, they can still contribute meaningfully. The game rewards specialization with more powerful spells, but diversifying a bit can also give you more options when fighting badass enemies like a dragon. Lots of enemies have Spell Defense, so straight-up damage isn't going to work, and the bane to spell attack rolls can really dampen casters' effectiveness.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Mythos stuff owns. I would make the deep ones sympathetic. That story was a smear job.

Serf
May 5, 2011




theironjef posted:

Mythos stuff owns because it exists at a perfect confluence of things for the nerd brain. It has like two million fiddly weird names you can memorize, and there's just enough fuzz around the edges of the stories that you can discuss them forever while getting plenty of opportunities to display all that memorized knowledge. It's like if the sum total of Pokemon knowledge was found in a shipwrecked journal.

I mean if you want the same feeling as Mythos stuff but don't want to use the names you could just use Silent Legions.

Serf
May 5, 2011




theironjef posted:

Yes! Exactly. People keep thinking it's disingenuous to suggest a fix for CTech that's "take the mythos out of there," but I'm being earnest. If I were fixing it, I'd be removing mythos, because I find it overrated, troublingly connected to a legacy of racism, and worry that it'd be impossible to run without people running in at dead sprints from the streets to well actually at me about how Hastur wouldn't do that. Putting in some less famous brain-rattling space monsters is a literal fix to my concerns.

You tell those people: it's the Mythos, I ain't gotta explain poo poo.

And the issues with Cthulhutech in specific are the lovely system and the awful garbage the writers added all on their own. The reason that it sucks is that the concept of "humans with giant robots fight Cthulhu" is rad but their execution is not only bad but actively offensive.

Serf
May 5, 2011




I do remember reading "Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family" as a kid and thinking that the story was kinda funny because the central character was obviously such an insane racist.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Josef bugman posted:

Is Call of Cthulu bad? As in both mechanically and ethically, I always thought it was seemed a little fun and didn't delve as deep into the creepy racisms of the mythos.

Most stuff either stays away from the racist aspects of Lovecraft's work or, more unfortunately, fails to understand that the material is racist. I still have my CoC d20 book with the tcho-tcho and that was released in 2001.

The upshot is that no matter what you do you're not putting money in Lovecraft's pocket since all his poo poo is public domain and also he died alone.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Halloween Jack posted:

17

Also he wants to go back in time and kill Lenin but not, like, J. Edgar Hoover.

I'm glad that I'm not the only one who's noticed this.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Halloween Jack posted:

Indeed, his pitch for a Night's Black Agents movie starts with "Mossad sniper Natalie Portman is on a mission in Syria when" and that's where I stopped reading.

There is no way that she does not kill vampire Assad in this movie lol

Serf
May 5, 2011




toughness should just give you a +1 AC and like DR 10/-

Serf
May 5, 2011




gradenko_2000 posted:

Reminder that the Fighter's Armor Mastery, a level 19 ability, gave DR 10/- in the PF playtest ... and then it was nerfed by 50% in Core.

while looking it up i discovered for the first time that DR doesn't work against spells lol. meanwhile in Shadow of the Demon Lord lots of enemies specifically get a trait that halves spell damage against them and gives their enemies a bane to making GBS threads them with spells.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Oh man I've been waiting for SenZar to get reviewed. For the longest time I thought it and Synnibar were the same thing but it looks like this gonna be bad in a whole other way from Synnibar. I am surprised at the appearance of fate points though. The earliest game I can think of off hand that had something like that was Adventure (I really should finish that F&F someday) with the Inspiration mechanic that allowed "dramatic editing" which I thought was pretty nifty back in the days of knowing nothing else but D&D 3.0.


Comrade Gorbash posted:

That first bit is so bizarre. It's almost like the TTRPG version of "dirtbag left" - the game design philosophy is basically something right off The Forge's early period, except injected with not-actually-ironic sexism and other assholery because "gently caress you don't tell me what to do!"

lol

Serf
May 5, 2011




FMguru posted:

The first-ever appearance of Fate Points was as an optional rule in the 1980 TSR spy game Top Secret. You had a pool of Fortune Points that you could spend to nullify the effects of a die roll that would have killed you (provided you came up with a just-about-plausible justification for it). The 1983 James Bond 007 RPG had a really sophisticated way of using Hero Points to bump up your die rolls (and reduce enemy levels of success).

JB007 was a terrific game, way ahead of its time. I really need to review it for this thread.

That sounds pretty interesting, and also a great mechanic for the setting. A James Bond game should have some way of improbably avoiding death at the last second and that seems like an good solution. I wonder why more games didn't have the fate points mechanic.

Serf
May 5, 2011




as opposed to the 18 or so actions every class can choose from at 1st level in other editions

Serf
May 5, 2011




Shadow of the Demon Lord actually has the most support right now of all tabletop RPGs.

Serf
May 5, 2011




MonsterEnvy posted:

I highly doubt no matter how good it is that it has surpassed D&D in player base.

It has over six billion players.

Serf
May 5, 2011




MonsterEnvy posted:

It does not. Was just rebutting him saying Shadow of the Demon Lord had more support.

Weird because it has way more support.

Serf
May 5, 2011




MonsterEnvy posted:

Yeah I stated in an earlier post. That when I was talking about support I mean from the player base and numerous other programs like roll20. Which are giving the game a very large player base that it's easy to find groups for.

Pretty much I meant a different kind of support then that. As 5e has a pretty slow release schedule. I understand the confusion.

Which is not support. You're discussing playerbase. Which is irrelevant to how well-supported a game is.

Serf
May 5, 2011




MonsterEnvy posted:

Supported by the Playerbase is what I meant in the first place.

Right so not support.

Serf
May 5, 2011




It's weird to judge a game by its install base. I could go over to the game room and post a recruit thread for loving Warbirds or Hollow Earth Expedition and get a game together. Having the most players is meaningless in 2018.

Serf
May 5, 2011




senrath posted:

Things with no legs are explicitly immune to being tripped.

what a dumb rule

Serf
May 5, 2011




They should just release the Book of Nine Swords again with the core rules bolted on and call that 6e

Serf
May 5, 2011




replace all classes with the factotum, which you then build how you want with talent options

Serf
May 5, 2011




killing gods is pretty rad, but the heavy metal aspect is meh.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Cythereal posted:

Yes, because dating multiple people at the same time is so incredibly normal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7qQ6_RV4VQ

grow up

Serf
May 5, 2011




if anything more "advanced" metals should hurt faeries more. steel weapons would be better, but the real poo poo is a titanium sword.

Serf
May 5, 2011




Halloween Jack posted:

I've been told titanium isn't good for cutting tools. It's light and strong (making it popular for hammers) but the edge would be soft and brittle. It is popular for diving knives because it's so corrosion-resistant.

right but this is magic. its not like a silver sword would be particularly good, but they sure as poo poo gently caress up werewolves

Serf
May 5, 2011




a uranium sword should just kill every faerie within 20 miles when unsheathed

Serf
May 5, 2011




Halloween Jack posted:

At one point I developed an irrational hatred of hand crossbows because my friends all saw Equilibrium and one of them just had to do Gunkata in every fantasy game. Welp, that's my story.

sounds like your friend owns

Serf
May 5, 2011




Halloween Jack posted:

Setting a D&D game in a gunpowder world is not as easy as it sounds--it's a surprisingly tall order to decouple AC from armour.

You can do scaling bonuses to defense, which is elegant and logical. The problem is that D&D monsters weren't designed with the assumption that everyone wears padded or leather armor at 1st level and gradually scales up. (See also: the BECMI Mystic.) I recall there's an OSR Old West game that does it, but it's not really trying to be compatible with other OSR games. (If it has any resemblance to Boot Hill, Idunno.)

Some games just keep the armor mechanics in place, or adapt them to the setting, which results in weird stuff like pirate games where the PCs will be desperate to get ahold of munition armour, or modern adventure games where everyone must go around in military body armour if they know what's good for them. (A good example is the OSR game Ancient Mysteries and Lost Treasures. It's inspired by a mix of pulp archaeology and technothriller fiction, but leans on the latter with regard to combat because it replaces D&D armor with a a remarkable preoccupation with various kinds of Kevlar vests and trauma plates.)

A method I'm going to try is to assume a base AC by class, which they can improve if they have access to their armour, and can boost further if they're willing to wear heavy armour with all the problems that entails.

take the stats for a crossbow, erase "crossbow" and write "rifle"

you're welcome

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Serf
May 5, 2011




PurpleXVI posted:

But, I... don't understand why this needs to be in the rules or flavour text at all. If the GM does not want to run a Magical Realm game, there are not constant orgies all over the Realm. It's not like popping out Dragonblooded babies is a mechanic that players could somehow abuse if it wasn't limited. I just don't get why it needed addressing at all except that the author was really eager to write about DB's loving.

I mean.

Please tell me there's no way to abuse this by using magic/charms to instantly pop them into fighting-ready 20-year-olds five minutes after they're out of the womb or something.

this is how i feel too. how is it at all relevant to things that will happen in games

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