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darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Mors Rattus posted:

Superiors: Asmodeus - Follow The Lady
[..]
The Infernal Police, or InfPol, are headed by Staciel, Demon of Intrigue. While the Game enforces the Rules of Hell on outsiders, InfPol hunts for traitors inside the Game. They are all skilled at interrogation, intimidation and gathering information. InfPol is to the standard Gamester what the SS were to the German police. Members keep their identities absolutely secret, even from each other. Only Asmodeus and possibly Stacial know all their names.
I am unsurprised that Hell's Internal Security is run by Stasiel.

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darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

oriongates posted:

Finally, if you're creating a rhul-thaun you have to roll 1d8+1d12 to determine your social status...I'm no probability wiz, does that actually produce a distribution any different from 2d10? Just curious.

Anyway, status ranges from Very Low (hobo), Low (poor), Average (working class), High (well off) and very high (totally rich). The table is weighted heavily towards Average and High status characters, so its good to see that the rhul-thaun have a thriving middle class.
Not substantially; big plateau on 10/11/12, but otherwise pretty similar.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Alien Rope Burn posted:

It isn't, as we'll see. New England is a lot better off than the Southwest, for example. Some areas are still ruled by gangs but others are comparatively civil. That being said, Autoduel is obviously intended as a "Points of Light" style setting like Rifts or D&D 4e, and the main problem with "Points of Light" style settings is that you need more than single points to develop and maintain a wider culture or industry. In Autoduel, you need a mine to bring up ore, a refinery to make the metal, a parts manufacturer to make the parts for the car, a car manufacturer - and the same for rubber and glass and silicon and grease and whatever the hell else you need to put it together, and all that is vulnerable, and that really isn't brought up. Granted, it can be taken as assumed that there are places safe enough to do this (for example, they have Britain making cars, which makes modest sense because it never collapsed), or that are at least under armed guard with Brotherhood trucks driving the supplies, but it's always taken as an assumption when it probably could be explained without a world of effort.
Honestly, I always figured that's where the PCs come in. Gas Town's sending another shipment of guzzolene to the Bullet Farm, so they hire some miscreants from the local tavern to keep the Rock Rats busy. Bunker Hill's losing too many caravans on the run south to the Castle, find out what's going on and make it stop. Uncle Albert needs more automotive- and ordnance-grade steel, so he tasks some dudes with getting a new mining/smelting/machining settlement up and running. And so on and so forth. You say vulnerability, I say problem for the PCs to solve. Although granted, they should really be saying that in the books, not just waiting for players to infer it.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

gradenko_2000 posted:

Monopoly Munchkin/Munchkin Monopoly was good, but I have another idea ...

... Munchkin d20

You joke, but that's happened, and I could swear it got written up in this thread.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Night10194 posted:

Didn't Australia wage all out war on its invasive rabbit population?

Did they lose that one like they lost to the emus?

Well, they can't really win a war against a lifeform as prolific as rabbits, but no, they've done pretty well.

"Wikipedia posted:

In 1950, after research was conducted by Frank Fenner, myxoma virus was deliberately released into the rabbit population, causing it to drop from an estimated 600 million[19] to around 100 million.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Night10194 posted:

Really, we need way more supernatural procedurals.
I'm actually working on something like that, with the addition of jurisdiction friction. "Yes, I am aware that the nightly reoccurrence of Pickett's Charge is occurring in Gettysburg National Military Park, and therefore the responsibility of us Smokies in the National Park Service, but the fact that they are ghosts makes them clearly a problem for the black-robes at the IRS, and better them than us." Even in the Shadow Law Enforcement, where the font used for badge numbers is above your clearance, people are going to fight over who gets the easy collars and who gets the expensive cases.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Mors Rattus posted:

The Amish aren't actually anti-technology. They're anti-convenience in their personal lives. They don't like things that get in the way of a proper and moral life by their standards, including most technology in the home which they view as distracting. Amish shops use a full range of technology that helps improve their labor, and most Amish homes have a telephone...on a pole out in a field, so that it is inconvenient to reach and annoying to use. Deliberately.

https://thefrailestthing.com/2012/08/04/the-tech-savvy-amish/

quote:

Even the Amish, often and mistakenly taken to be Luddites par excellence, are not exempt from this state of perpetual negotiation [between technology and living morally]. In fact, the Amish are paradigmatically modern in that they have made the need to think about technology a defining feature of their culture. That they do so with extreme deliberateness and with so strong a preference for the conservation of their way of life only superficially distinguishes them from the rest of American society. In their consciousness of technology and its consequences, the Amish have more in common with the rest of us than any of us do with members of pre-modern society.

[...]

The Amish live in the same world that we do and are as aware of new technologies as the rest of us. But while technological momentum has taken root within most of American culture rendering the notion of technological determinism plausible, the Amish have succeeded in creating philosophical momentum. That is, they have institutionalized technological criticism which has substituted for the absence of change as a stabilizing factor. And it seems to me that this makes the Amish just about the most tech-savvy group of people around.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Cythereal posted:

One little note before I leave for work: American tanks were actually quite well regarded during the war, just for reasons that aren't sexy: American tanks were reliable, fuel-efficient, and comfortable to drive and fight in. They didn't have the best armor or hardest-hitting gun, but more than any other nation's armor you could count on American tanks to actually get where they needed to be, and they were easy to keep running. One of the biggest problems for Soviet and especially German tanks was their mechanical unreliability. Having the biggest gun and thickest armor doesn't do you much good if the tank can't be relied on to move for more than thirty minutes at a time before something breaks and needs to be replaced.
As long as we're defending the honor of Allied armor, unreliability was actually, not a design goal, but a known compromise for the Soviets. Having a transmission that could survive 3000km would be nice, but it'd also increase the cost of the tank 2000 rubles, reducing the number of tanks they could field, and why bother when the hull's going to be a flaming wreck inside 2000km? Better explained in this lecture.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Leraika posted:

I guess you could do vikings, maybe.

e: that is, if you had to tie your fantasy culture to a real-world one
I was thinking possibly something like Fantasy American Imperialists; roving bands that will suck down every resource they can get their hands on to expand their caravans and families, whether by theft, scam, or trade, before moving on to another area to loot. If you got food, they'll steal it, if you got trees, they'll clear cut them, and if you got metal, they'll trade it for trinkets and magic. All shall feed the insatiable maw of the Nacirema.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

marshmallow creep posted:

I like this. I imagine them living in a giant wagon train, emphasis on giant wagon, where some of the wagons are so large they need hundreds of oxen to pull them and can support a parliament with all their accompanying staff. But it's just for one really rich "trade creator."
Possible, I hadn't considered the Supply-Side aspect. I was just thinking about the notion of First-World-as-parasite, but instead of sending their merchants to buy your last grain of wheat, they come and take it in person. Alternatively, mid-19th century Americans, who come to take your poo poo Manifest their Destiny as they continue chasing the horizon. Just that kind of arrogance that it is right for them to take your poo poo, and that you are in the wrong for resisting.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Night10194 posted:

The funny thing is, I could see 'finances' as a stat actually working out as an alternative to having a money system in a game. "I have 5 points in being rich, so I just roll against that to bribe this guy." could work out.

E: And yes, I hate HSD for the libertopia nonsense more than anything else.
That's how WoD does/did it, except there it was a Resources merit instead of a Finances stat, and I think most games that don't just work in dollars and GP. The problem with HSD isn't that it has a finances stat, it's that it has five of them.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Alien Rope Burn posted:

Isn't HSD basically post-scarcity anyway? (I don't feel like looking back to check.)
I just looked anyway, so I'll save you the trouble. It is nominally post-scarcity and has a quasi-socialist welfare system that allegedly ensures everybody has enough to get by on, through the use of an automated Ledger program to manage each furry's investments. At the same time, though, everything belongs to the megacorps, who realistically would not be above creating a little scarcity to drive their profits up.
E:

wiegieman posted:

Post-scarcity is a silly idea, anyway. I have no doubt that even if we do somehow get "enough" of the resources we need now, we'll find something else we don't have enough of.
That's kinda how things go in Eclipse Phase; even in the far future, when everybody can have all the steak and Armani they want for more-or-less free, there're still a few things that are in limited supply, like skilled human work, novelty, and living space.

darthbob88 fucked around with this message at 16:19 on Jun 10, 2017

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Kurieg posted:

It could just be the coccyx...
Yeah, but that leaves the same sort of problem; I can see why whomever would want to model tik'toks on a basically humanoid two-arms-two-legs-one-head form, but why would they bother including the dongus or the tailbone?

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Halloween Jack posted:

Oh, I forgot that I'd brought up Fallen London so that I could add this: The only way Hc Svnt Dracones multiple finance stats makes sense to me is if they were inspired by Storynexus type games where you gain and spend reputation with multiple important factions, and/or you have multiple intangible currencies (like trading knowledge and gossip).
Well, it makes sense if you assume as they did that a character's economic power is as important and deserves the same Power/Finesse/Resilience nuances as their physical/mental/social abilities. Or, in other words, if you're writing an absurdly hyper-capitalist RPG.
E:

Zereth posted:

They aren't. They're like, your Money Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, and Fourth Stat. I forget what Fourth Stat is. But you've got physical and mental and social and financial and they all have those four stats.
Fifth stat. Dexterity, Acuity, Strength, Resilience, and Presence.

darthbob88 fucked around with this message at 18:07 on Jun 13, 2017

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Night10194 posted:

No, I mean kvas is specifically only barely alcoholic, if at that.
Like, maybe 1% ABV. It's basically/literally liquid bread.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

PurpleXVI posted:

Reminds me of that one story, "the path less taken," or something similar, where humans were the only ones without easy and simple, antigravity and hyperdrives, and as a result we were also the only ones with stuff like combustion engines, jet fighters and machineguns. At which point a group of ALIEN IMPERIALISTS show up... in their spaceships that are basically the equivalent of colonial-era sailships and with blackpowder guns, and we kill most of them, take their hyperdrives, and the aliens are like. "oh wait gently caress now THESE guys have hyperdrives" and that's where the short story ends.

The Road Not Taken, by Harry Turtledove.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Mors Rattus posted:

(Actually, one of his short story themes is the existence of "Free Parks" - areas you can go to in which the only rule is 'do not hurt each other', with anyone doing so getting zapped by floaty robots that knock people out - as is their victim. The short story about these areas is essentially 'why this entire idea is terrible: the story'.)
This story, I assume? Because yeah, that sounds like a nice idea, until the over-arching peace enforcement goes away.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Dallbun posted:

207: Silky Poison

Uh, so there’s this spy operating in a major city, using a blowgun with poison that has an oddly specific effect: it temporarily makes someone do what he tells them, and then makes them forget what they did when under its effects. The spy uses this on important officials, merchants, and wizards and the like, then sidles up to them in the street and whispers to them to come to him later in the night and tell him their secrets.
To be fair, I'm pretty sure that's based on a real thing, if badly exaggerated for effect.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Josef bugman posted:

Broadly? hosed around with stuff.

What they did was start out with the idea that "we are, inherently, more knowledgable than these pagans let us prove this". To do this they would go on heroquests not as sacred explorations of a culture but to both change things and to power level themselves. This led, eventually, to them loving around with the universe by doing things like setting up a "swap" between two local land goddesses in order to prove that they were one and the same and it didn't matter which you worshipped. They succeeded and then all the crops across one area died of blight and all the marriages in the other area did not last more than a year.
Most notoriously,

quote:

The Jrusteli soon became a mighty sea-spanning Empire. At the time, the Waertagi had a monopoly on sea trade thanks to their dragon ships, but the God Learners summoned a series of water gods to invoke the God-Who-Burns-Water. This surprised the Waertagi, who did not believe water could also be fire, and they were destroyed.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

JackMann posted:

It's like, car companies found that adding lead to gasoline would help eliminate knock. They weren't bad for figuring that out. They were bad because they didn't consider any of the consequences of their actions and let it ruin the lives of millions of people for their personal advantage.

Side note, but they absolutely did consider the consequences of their actions.

quote:

On October 30, 1924, Midgley participated in a press conference to demonstrate the apparent safety of TEL [Tetra-Ethyl Lead, the anti-knock additive], in which he poured TEL over his hands, placed a bottle of the chemical under his nose, and inhaled its vapor for 60 seconds, declaring that he could do this every day without succumbing to any problems.[5][8] However, the State of New Jersey ordered the Bayway plant to be closed a few days later [due to many many cases of lead poisoning among the workers], and Jersey Standard was forbidden to manufacture TEL again without state permission. Midgley would later have to take leave of absence from work after being diagnosed with lead poisoning.[9] He was relieved of his position as vice president of GMCC in April 1925, reportedly due to his inexperience in organizational matters, but he remained an employee of General Motors.[5]
That same dude also invented dichlorodifluoromethane as a safer refrigerant, which you might know better as Freon.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Night10194 posted:

Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Dark Heresy: Part 14

Do you work for the idiot or the lunatic?

Inquisitor Van Vuygens is an Ordo Xenos fanatic, convinced that the Scarystar is a sign of the leading edge of a Tyranid Hive Fleet. He is a disciple and former Acolyte of the famous Inquisitor Kryptmann, who decided that the best way to deal with the all-devouring bug aliens was to divert them into the fungal soccer hooligans. A scientist at heart, he has his Acolytes running around trying to piece together just what the deal was with the various species the Imperium exterminated when it first took over the Calixis sector, to see if the Scarystar has any roots in these pre-imperial races. If you like poking around the cyclopean bones of mass extinctions, he could be fun to investigate for.

That was Kryptman's second plan to deal with the Tyranids. His first plan was to just burn a giant cordon in their path, ordering Exterminatus across half a sector in order to deny the Tyranids that biomass. After he got the Inquisitorial boot for the largest act of genocide ever, then he diverted the Hive Fleet into the Orks, hoping to leave them in an endless war and give the Imperium time to prepare. Of course, if the war ever does end, the Imperium will have to contend with either a Hive Fleet fattened off an empire's worth of Orks, or an army of Ork veterans honed by their endless war.

Given that this man taught van Vuygens, I can't help thinking that Calixis Sector will wind up on fire and/or eaten.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

TheGreatEvilKing posted:

Agreed on the first, disagree on the second. If your entire class is defined by the ability to pick a lock, maybe your class doesn't have enough meat? The rogue and the wizard get a lot of weird overlap where the rogue can steal all the wizard's tricks by paying money and the wizard gives up combat power to do poo poo you don't care about most of the time. The real problem is that the wizard plays "I win" cards and the rogue has a chance to fail, but if a 5th level rogue's lockpicking ability was knock at-will no one would care. People would be fine if wizards could burn spells to do things worse than what other classes get for free.
Rogues are also the charming class, the sneaking class, and the trap-finding class. I'm not sure how a wizard can replace a rogue on trap-disarming or sneak-attacking, but I'm sure somebody else will find a way, possibly by summoning a rogue-equivalent. Meanwhile, AFAIK the only way a rogue can match a wizard's disintegrate or stone to mud or whatever is with a wand/scroll/potion of disintegrate or stone to mud. Magic can replace skills, but skills can't really replace magic.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Hel posted:

Isn't 40k the one with Obiwan Sherlock Clousseau?

The very same.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

White Coke posted:

Isn't there a game which lets players retroactively create details for their plan, so they can turn an enemy into their mole or make sure they stashed the supplies they needed in the exact supply closet they've opened? Seems like you could do the same thing with letting players influence the truth about the monster they're fighting.
I'd think most crime games would allow that. I know Blades in the Dark does; players can take a little bit of harm, then explain that they bribed this guard a week ago or whatever.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Kavak posted:

Everything is equally easy to obtain except for the AK-74UB, which by the rules only has a shorter range and higher price than the original AK-47. :psyduck:.

EDIT: The M4 Carbine, basically the US Military's service rifle, is statistically inferior in every way to an original M16. Somehow I don't think that's a Pentagon Wars type joke.
Looks to me like it just has a shorter range increment, which TBH I'd kinda expect in going from a rifle with a 20 inch barrel to a carbine with a 14.5 inch barrel. What surprises me is that they don't model the carbine being a pound or two lighter than the full-length rifle.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Halloween Jack posted:

:toot: Fascism is inherently capitalist


In defense of the goober, I kinda figured that meant stuff like "Well, we'd like to trade with/hire foreigners, but this damned fascist xenophobia is preventing that." But yeah, if they can't figure out how to turn fascist total war into personal profit, they're especially shameful libertarians.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

EclecticTastes posted:


The Raust Model 2620, with under grip serrated blade. I'll let you guys handle this one.


The CDEM 32 US with under barrel punching spikes. The book claims these are meant to be used like brass knuckles. HOW?!
I feel obliged to point out the existence of the Apache revolver, which was a combination gun, knife, and brass knuckles, but that doesn't pretend to be suitable for any range longer than your arm.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

oriongates posted:

It took a second glance, but I noticed the angel-raiden on the last page apparently decided to stick a spike on a double-barreled shotgun as something that is even less practical than the weirdo bayonets (not as bad as the flail though).

I think that's a scythe more than a spike, which is a cool aesthetic but a really bad idea.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS
If anybody's at all interested, Spire is doing a Kickstarter for a sourcebook; they are fully funded and approaching the "Even more art" and 10th scenario stretch goals.

I discovered this because one writer I follow felt called out by the Inksmith class.

quote:

The Inksmith class. The Inksmith is a black-market, black-magic occultist who channels the power of pulp fiction into spells. They can knock out adversaries with a single haymaker, introduce schlocky details into the story, embody the fears of a community and, if things are moving slowly, magically summon a man holding a gun through the nearest available door.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

unseenlibrarian posted:

...I think I'm the writer in question, albeit I was mostly joking because of the protagonist of the Blockbuster vignettes.

It feels weird to be referred to as "A writer someone follows", somehow.
Probably yeah, and I also appreciate the Passage works. Apologies for not giving you proper credit, but I'm never sure how/whether to cite "something a guy on Tumblr/Twitter/whatever said".

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Mors Rattus posted:

So far as I know, it's still going.

This doc only has until 2016 but there are more recent entries.

Not that I can tell. He's still doing "Left Behind Classic Fridays", but I can't find anything reviewing newer books after July 2016. Which is fine IMO, because we got all we really needed about how the series is awful anti-Christian trash from the first two or three.

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

Mors Rattus posted:

Judaism is honestly really into the idea that you can argue with and hold God accountable. Job does it, Abraham does it, there is at least one rabbinical story/parable about a dude maintaining that even divine miracles do not matter in an argument of the law without citation of sources and being correct.

Last page, but I'm pretty sure you mean the Oven of Akhnai.

quote:

In the story, a new type of oven is brought before the Sanhedrin and the rabbis debate whether or not this oven is susceptible to ritual impurity. Rabbi Eliezer ben Hurcanus argues that the oven is ritually pure while the other rabbis, including the nasi Rabban Gamaliel, argue that the oven is impure. When none of Rabbi Eliezer's arguments convince his colleagues, he cries out, "If the halakha is in accordance with my opinion, this carob tree will prove it." At this point, the carob tree leaps from the ground and moves far away. The other rabbis explain that a carob tree offers no proof in a debate over law. Rabbi Eliezer cries out, "If the halakha is in accordance with my opinion, the stream will prove it." The stream begins to flow backwards, but again the other rabbis point out that one does not cite a stream as proof in matters of law. Rabbi Eliezer cries out, "If the halakha is in accordance with my opinion, the walls of the study hall will prove it." The walls of the study hall begin to fall, but are then scolded by Rabbi Joshua ben Hananiah who reprimands the walls for interfering in a debate among scholars. Out of respect for Rabbi Joshua, they do not continue to fall, but out of respect for Rabbi Eliezer, they do not return to their original places.

In frustration, Rabbi Eliezer finally cries out, "If the halakha is in accordance with my opinion, Heaven will prove it." From Heaven a voice is heard, saying, "Why are you differing with Rabbi Eliezer, as the halakha is in accordance with his opinion in every place that he expresses an opinion?" Rabbi Joshua responds, "It [the Torah] is not in heaven" (Deuteronomy 30:12). He responds in this way because the Torah, which was given by God to mankind at Sinai, specifically instructs those who follow it that they are to look to the received Torah as their source and guide. The Torah says, "It is not in heaven, that you should say, 'Who will go up to heaven for us, and get it for us so that we may hear it and observe it?' Neither is it beyond the sea, that you should say, 'Who will cross to the other side of the sea for us, and get it for us so that we may hear it and observe it?' No, the word is very near to you; it is in your mouth and in your heart for you to observe" (Deuteronomy 30:12-14).

Rabbi Joshua's response then expresses the view that the work of law is a work of human activity, and that the Torah itself supports this legal theory. The Torah is not a document of mystery which must have its innate meaning revealed by a minority, but it is instead a document from which law must be created through the human activity of debate and consensus. Rabbinic literature was capable of recognizing differing opinions as having a degree of legitimacy (Yer. Ber. 3b), yet the community remains united and the ruling which is ultimately followed comes through proper jurisprudence. As such, Rabbi Eliezer's miraculous appeals represent a differing legal theory and were outside of proper jurisprudence which meant that they would not be followed. Instead the Jewish community followed the ruling of the majority in this issue and in others. The Talmud asks how God responded to this incident. We are told that upon hearing Rabbi Joshua's response, God smiled and stated, "My children have triumphed over Me; My children have triumphed over Me."

E: Or, if you're feeling less reverent, I've also heard that story end with

quote:

...In frustration, Rabbi Eliezer finally cries out, "If the halakha is in accordance with my opinion, Heaven will prove it."

And a voice from heaven says "HEEE'SSS RIIIIGHT."

The other rabbis look up, then over at Rabbi Eliezer, and say "OK, now it's 3 to 2."

darthbob88 fucked around with this message at 21:58 on Oct 23, 2018

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

HerraS posted:

The most glorious noble family in the Empire will always be von Saponatheim.

Soap home? And I'm told that one of the antagonists is a dude named "Lord Dentist", so who's that?

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

That Old Tree posted:

Aren't they giant robots firing giant bullets? I'm picturing 1000 trash cans in a big sack on the back of a Gundam.
Some quick research has the Boom Gun weighing 867lbs/390kg, or about the same as a 37mm AT gun, so it'd be more like small fire extinguishers. That's still a lot to pack around, though.

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darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS

unseenlibrarian posted:

It's probably because it's 4Chan and they're making a dumb reference to the equally dumb tvtrope thing about stockings.

Xiahou Dun posted:

Stockings? Excuse me?
Stockings, specifically the expanse of bare thigh between thigh-high stockings and a miniskirt. Although that term actually derives from NGE, rather than the reverse.

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