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UdayHusseinFan91
May 28, 2016


Im glad this thread is back

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Hogge Wild
Aug 21, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Pillbug

UdayHusseinFan91 posted:

Im glad this thread is back

hell yeah!

Code Jockey
Jan 24, 2006

you can call
but I seldom answer after all




Isaac how is the shine, also the chickens

Isaac
Aug 3, 2006



Fun Shoe

I posted this in my stupid gbs thread but its proper content i can put in here.

Distilling Vodka Notes:

So I put together two identical washes, then added 1.5 cups of barley malt in one.

Day 5

No grain - 1040sg
grain - 1025sg

So the grain definitely speeds the fermentation.

SG measures the density of the liquid. So 1000sg is water, the fermentation is complete when the SG goes to 1000 or below. You can adjust for temperature if you are being very professional about it but thats about it. If you dont have a hydrometer (You should if you are doing any fermenting) you can try and guess the SG by tasting the wash. If there are unfermented sugars it should taste very sweet, if you cant detect much or any sweetness its "Dry" or ready to go.

Wash/Mash/Wort etc all basically mean the same thing, a mix of stuff you are trying to ferment.


Edit: I didnt take the starting SG because I couldnt find the good hydrometer, but the recipe was exactly the same so if anything the grain one should have started at a slightly higher SG. Im estimating they started around 1070sg

Isaac
Aug 3, 2006



Fun Shoe

Both washes were the standard Birdwatchers Tomato Paste Wash.

slothrop
Dec 7, 2006

Santa Alpha, Fox One... Gifts Incoming ~~~>===|>



Soiled Meat

Just read this thread in it's entirety. 10/10, would read again. Does your commercial stuff have national distribution? Always after interesting whiskies and gins in bottle shop I work in

Isaac
Aug 3, 2006



Fun Shoe

slothrop posted:

Just read this thread in it's entirety. 10/10, would read again. Does your commercial stuff have national distribution? Always after interesting whiskies and gins in bottle shop I work in

No the rum and scotch wont be for years and theres some experiments going on with low price point vodka to get some cash flow

slothrop
Dec 7, 2006

Santa Alpha, Fox One... Gifts Incoming ~~~>===|>



Soiled Meat

Cool I'll keep an eye out. How are you finding the aging process going? Do you lose alcohol like the Scots or water like in Tasmania? If you're looking for cash flow stuff, my limited experience from the retail side of things would be gin. I sell 20 times more gin than vodka, entry level price point for Aussie stuff is $65 and no one bats an eye paying $100 plus. Any time we organise a gin tasting or put something on social media it blows up. Anywho, that's just my two cents! Great thread, I'll stop making GBS threads it up now!

Isaac
Aug 3, 2006



Fun Shoe

slothrop posted:

Cool I'll keep an eye out. How are you finding the aging process going? Do you lose alcohol like the Scots or water like in Tasmania? If you're looking for cash flow stuff, my limited experience from the retail side of things would be gin. I sell 20 times more gin than vodka, entry level price point for Aussie stuff is $65 and no one bats an eye paying $100 plus. Any time we organise a gin tasting or put something on social media it blows up. Anywho, that's just my two cents! Great thread, I'll stop making GBS threads it up now!

Nah I love talking about retail and spirits like no joke. There are so many australian micro distilleries making gin that the trial and error process for making a sellable product is gonna take forever to make something quality. Its also alot of different equipment than a dark spirit. At a 25L still level its pretty easy to get everything you want but a 600L everything magnifies.

slothrop
Dec 7, 2006

Santa Alpha, Fox One... Gifts Incoming ~~~>===|>



Soiled Meat

Isaac posted:

Nah I love talking about retail and spirits like no joke. There are so many australian micro distilleries making gin that the trial and error process for making a sellable product is gonna take forever to make something quality. Its also alot of different equipment than a dark spirit. At a 25L still level its pretty easy to get everything you want but a 600L everything magnifies.

OK, I'll blabber on for a bit then, I think it's a fascinating industry and it's sad that there is so much taxation on it which stifles local development. I've been lucky enough to try a fair few Aussie whiskies through work and by far and away my favourite "range" has been the Heartwood releases. While he doesn't distill the spirit himself, he certainly knows how to age it!

I hadn't considered that you couldn't simply make small batches and then increase size. Is this down to differences in the still designs? I'd love to know more about your whisky if you're happy to share, I understand if you'd prefer not to, it may be commercially sensitive or just I'll throw a few questions at you feel free to answer some or none.

As I understand it the two most important factors in how a whisky turns out are wood and environment, with time being the third major variable. It'd be cool to know what sort of casks you're using, how often you're doing tasting and if you're game to share what region you're in. If you're close to a decent wine making region would you consider using old wine casks? I've had a few wine finishes (mainly Scotch) that were excellent, the only Aussie one I can think of is the Starward which was not really to my tastes. I guess the market for whisky has been so dominated by ex-Bourbon casks for so long that people have come to know and expect that influence now.

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Isaac
Aug 3, 2006



Fun Shoe

slothrop posted:

OK, I'll blabber on for a bit then, I think it's a fascinating industry and it's sad that there is so much taxation on it which stifles local development. I've been lucky enough to try a fair few Aussie whiskies through work and by far and away my favourite "range" has been the Heartwood releases. While he doesn't distill the spirit himself, he certainly knows how to age it!

I hadn't considered that you couldn't simply make small batches and then increase size. Is this down to differences in the still designs? I'd love to know more about your whisky if you're happy to share, I understand if you'd prefer not to, it may be commercially sensitive or just I'll throw a few questions at you feel free to answer some or none.

As I understand it the two most important factors in how a whisky turns out are wood and environment, with time being the third major variable. It'd be cool to know what sort of casks you're using, how often you're doing tasting and if you're game to share what region you're in. If you're close to a decent wine making region would you consider using old wine casks? I've had a few wine finishes (mainly Scotch) that were excellent, the only Aussie one I can think of is the Starward which was not really to my tastes. I guess the market for whisky has been so dominated by ex-Bourbon casks for so long that people have come to know and expect that influence now.

I mostly do my own vodka and dont know a great deal about the scotch. Its definitely in second hand barrels that have had various things in them. The water that gets used is from the springs at the start of the molonglo river. Alot of stuff is in 5L barrels because it counts as being aged but some speculate you are only increasing the surface area exposed to the wood and 5 years isnt long enough for all the chemical reactions to occur.

I dont know who hartwood are but I could find out pretty easy from the distillers accociation. This is also definite wine country.


With small batches of anything you can throw out like 50% of the product and get a great drink for cents. With a larger operation you cant waste that much and it adds bad flavours. Also things like charcoal filtering are very easy to do on a tiny scale but would cost a fortune on a commercial scale.

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