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Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Hey thread, so a couple of weeks ago, one of the various military support organizations showed the movie Everest here in Djibouti, and Chris Klinke and Tonya Riggs came to talk after the film as guest speakers afterwards.

I actually got to spend a lot of time bullshitting about Everest and poo poo with both of them. It was actually pretty loving cool; I work in satellite communications and Chris was actually pretty curious about some of the things that I knew. Apparently, communications are terrible in mountains -- who knew?! He talked about how his ordeal with his satphone on K2 in 2008, and he was relieved to find out there were simple tools they can use/purchase to make communicating on the mountains a lot better.

Tonya was very talkative and we enjoyed a long talk about parallels in soldiers who seek multiple deployments and mountain junkies. She was very down to earth when she got out of her "talking like a Toastmaster" voice. The most interesting point for me when talking to her was her genuine regret about seeing dead people on the mountain -- her expedition summited the same year David Sharp and a poo poo load of other climbers died on the NE side, and three Sherpas died in an avalanche on the Nepal side. She said that she tried not to think about it then, especially as her expedition when right by David Sharp's frozen popsicle-rear end, and that she felt regret about that aspect of that. She said when she turned around and started working down, knowing she was passing people who may have died that week, it was her primary motivation to keep going, but she doesn't like talking about that in the paid speeches she gives. I guess "I want to trudge on sheerly to not be a hike-sicle," doesn't sell well to middle managers.

I felt like I learned a lot about their mental state, at least talking to them in person. They seemed to light up talking about climbing and the unparalleled solitude one experiences in remote locations, especially when one can see stars in broad daylight, and realize their walking above where planes fly. I didn't feel as callous as I do about some climbers, as both of them were genuinely in love with the challenge and the beauty of it; Tonya was part of a sophomoric, yet greater gesture, and she had turned down another climb when she realized all the money in the world wouldn't walk you up Annapurna; and in the case of Chris, was actually humble enough to turn away when the climb on K2 was too much, and attempted to organize some rescue when things went really bad.

Wasabi the J fucked around with this message at 21:20 on Apr 13, 2016

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Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Outrail posted:

First fatality will include an investment banker who thinks anything is possible with just your own pluck, determination and a four million dollar inheritance.

Trump is doing a summit bid?

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


"i'd rather die livin on the edge instead of in my sleep"

*dies in sleep*

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Maluco Marinero posted:

I love that a trekking company or two have wasted no time slinging mud at other operators, despite the fact that every single one of them will have carbon copy waivers, "all due care taken but no responsibility".

It's really the scummiest thing, all jokes aside. Tact is not a value for these outfits, as "professional" as they are; they consistently will take .01 microseconds to slander another outfit that makes the exact same risk decisions simply because it wasn't them.

It's like a car dealership showing up on the news at the scene of a wreck in order use the recent fatalities to highlight the importance of choosing a vehicle with improved safety measures, like Mercedes' (optional) collision avoidance system with auto-braking.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


bradzilla posted:

First person with lung cancer to summit Everest

http://www.today.com/health/hope-kept-me-going-cancer-survivor-one-lung-climbs-world-t73781

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


http://www.atlasandboots.com/seven-second-summits/

quote:

To this date, only one man has climbed all of the mountains above: Austrian mountaineer Christian Stangl who incidentally has also climbed the seven third summits as well, meaning he has climbed the first, second and third highest mountain on every continent, known as the triple seven summits. Epic.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Time Cowboy posted:

Truly a hill worth dying on.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqpGiwNtMvY#t=64s

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008



Google that loving mountain what the fuuuuck. Its insane looking.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


elwood posted:

"Climbing" Gokyo Ri





Gokyo to Thangnak





Nothing makes me more in awe of the eight thousanders than realizing the unremarkable foothills in that area are taller than any mountain I have ever seen in the US or southern Afghanistan.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Did it smell bad?

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Something's off...

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Cojawfee posted:

Based on that video he seems to realize he has his son and needs to stop doing so much stupid stuff. Seems like this Everest thing is something he feels like he really needs to do no matter what. After that he might be able to say he's done.

Problem is, addicts are always gonna take that last hit before they quit.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


DumbparameciuM posted:

Annual Everest thread 2017: ALL GIFTS ARE ACCEPTED BY CHOMOLUNGMA

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Newest thread got QCSd and then mods came and closed it.

I want to talk about cool mountains, good climbers, human tragedy, and rich bucket listers dying.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


My opinion of the death pool was it was only supposed to be for quality submissions like old Photoshop Friday threads.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Picnic Princess posted:

There's a solo female climber stuck near the summit of Canada's tallest mountain due to earthquakes loosening a bunch of seracs and causing avalanches, making descent too dangerous.

https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/article/earthquakes-strand-climber-near-summit-mount-logan

Sounds like she's ureally steck up there!

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Good luck Polish Bros.

Hoping for another suicidal success like the Polish line.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Cojawfee posted:

If you're using ropes, couldn't you just set a rope and rappel down a ledge?

Some of the faces in 8 thousanders are literally hundreds of meters high, so you'd need at least a few hundred meters of rope.

Think about how much that weighs. There's a reason Porter's and Sherpas set ropes for weeks before the season really starts.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


gohuskies posted:

No, you just do multiple rappels from anchor point to anchor point. People do this all the time on multi-pitch routes - you set an anchor, rappel down to the next anchor point, build a new anchor there, pull down your rope, set up a new rappel, and so forth on down. It's a basic part of multi-pitch climbing, people rappel routes thousands of feet long with one (or more often two) 60-70 meter ropes all the time.

Oh I thought dude meant just rappelling down in one go not what you're describing.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


I truly want to see Nanga Parbat from the Faerie Meadows before I die.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Josef K. Sourdust posted:

Well, if the Taliban have their way those two events could coincide.

I know :c

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Doctor Malaver posted:

That's a convenient religious doctrine. We'll lease our holy ground to the government and we'll suggest to people not to climb, despite that there's a chain specifically for that purpose. So we get the money AND we're clean before the god/s because hey we placed the sign not our fault if they climb, right?

Maybe Australia has had even up to today, a complicated and unpleasant relationship with it's indigenous people.

Or maybe the Aboriginal people believe that their doctrine doesn't necessarily mean others can't do what the please.

But I suppose that's pretty convenient.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Paladine_PSoT posted:

Bonus points if you freeze yourself grabbing your junk at China while doing the metal horns gesture, and figure out a way to anchor yourself there such that it's too much effort to remove you.

EngineerJoe posted:

China would blow you up if they couldn't move you if you did that.


Eat a bag of FREE TIBET confetti

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


uXs posted:

Saw 'Everest' was on Netflix and watched it. Pretty interesting movie.

Afterwards I read about the 1996 disaster a bit and stumbled onto this:

http://www.alanarnette.com/blog/2017/05/27/everest-2017-weekend-update-may-27/

Which contains the quote: "Also under the leadership of 7 Summits Club Director, Alexander Abramov, they covered up some of the many visible dead bodies on the north side including Tsewang Paljor aka “Green Boots”, which I thought had already been moved by the Chinese:"

So apparently our friend Paljor is still there.

quote:

update: 7 Summits Club told me that just said that for the press and didn’t cover Paljor’s body … “I think it’s not worth mentioning. Maybe they put a couple of stones. These words were more for the press to show it’s done more than one action. In reality they covered only one Marko.”

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Mr. Despair posted:

The adrenaline rush after nearly getting seriously hurt/killed is an amazing feeling, half this thread should get away from a computer long enough to experience it sometime.

It's such a great rush that you kinda don't really care about that car that hit you!

Until you get to work and throw up outside the door from the body wracking pain. Didn't even notice for half an hour.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Cojawfee posted:

I would feel worse for his girlfriend's mom. "Oh, your daughter is dating a doctor? My daughter is dating a guy who climbs up rocks or something and lives in a van."

He's had a National Geographic article about his brass balls, fitness, and dedication. I think he'd be well accepted in most polite company.

Jesus Christ goons.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Cartoon posted:

Is there a word yet for the intense but irrational desire to beat people to death with their selfie sticks?

I'm pretty sure "paragliding over the 13th tallest mountain in the world, while simultaneously smashing previous paragliding attempts" is the most appropriate time to use a selfie stick.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Watched Meru last night packing up front vacation. Really interesting documentary of the members of the expression, a little light on climbing details. Wild setup for the main dudes family situation.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


nsaP posted:

Bill Burr is right (also an amateur helicopter pilot)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSAzX209knE

Nothing makes me label someone more instantly than finding out if they agree with Bill butt.

Bet you have strongly felt yet poorly formed opinions about movies and feminists.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


barbecue at the folks posted:

I don't understand why they talk in menacing tones about the "killer mountain" when the real story is in asking why these people, many with families to take care of, willingly throw their lives away in a frozen hell they actively climbed and suffered their way into. The mountain is not going to force it's way into your flat to freeze your foot off, that's someone else's fault entirely.

edit: jesus that story

I met some Everest people while deployed, ironically their reasons are similar to dudes that seek out deployments and poo poo.

They typically have boring poo poo lives, and life "makes sense" in a high stress, socially isolated environments. Even myself, while on deployment, felt better than usual because I had my routine, and the sense of danger (not really that elevated compared to more dangerous jobs in the military, but higher than baseline) kept my focus on completing objectives and away from the banality of life back home.

It's insidious because you're aware it's selfish but you rationalize away the underlying motivations and are enabled by the people around you who have the same problem.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Rondette posted:

I wonder if that will make it easier then. Looking forward to the Everest hipsters who brag about climbing the step. 'Oh you climbed it post step. Ok. Let me tell you how much harder i had it'

💯 this is already happening with some climbers lamenting some of the mountains charm is gone.

As charming as a traffic jam at 8800m altitude can be. I'll actually be more curious if climbing becomes less fatal.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


PostNouveau posted:

It's a good thing that rock fell off, right? That was the big bottleneck?

Yes. Less time in the death zone is overall good, and that loving rock was one of the few true gently caress you obstacles, and it definitely wasn't reasonable to try and push several hundred climbers up and down it in a day.

As there's not a 10m boulder to funnel single retards up at 8800m, I predict were going to have quite a few less "stuck in traffic midday on summit, died in the dark on descent".


It is now the Hillary Stairs.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


She climbed two other 8k mountains, I'm pretty sure she was legit.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


People think I'm crazy for carrying a small pack with more water than I need, a few lighters, first aid kit, whistle, and a flashlight with fresh batteries on my day hikes.

It's a little much, but that extra couple lbs naked me sure I can last through an unexpected night.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Yes I have one of those too but it keeps getting used in the garage

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Leperflesh posted:

Are people climbing/hiking despite clear and obvious warnings about avalanches ready to go off in the area, or is this one of those "if you hike anywhere here in winter there's always a .01% chance of an avalanche" and a few folks just get super unlucky?

Global warming means this trend will only continue. I'm pretty sure spring is a pretty dangerous time to be around big glaciers too.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


I don't mean to be crass or oversimplify a complex problem, but if they're trying to still have lots of climbing traffic, and still minimize the ecologically impact of climbers, could they not build a nearby "green" waste management facility?

I would imagine if there's a sustainable way of handling all the poo poo and trash at base camp, it would benefit climbers and the government.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


barbecue at the folks posted:

Just limit the number of summit passes, put them on auction and let the Free Market™ take care of it. There are enough rich idiots to probably make what they get now and much more. The highest bidders get to sacrifice themselves to satiate the mountain's hunger, everybody wins.

This honestly could be workable with a provision to maybe have previous high altitude ascents count as credits or something, so that well qualified mountaineers can be given access to perform their climbs and rich people subsidize the cost.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Leperflesh posted:

Is there a reliable governing body that can certify that a given individual has made a summit attempt at a given peak, or that establishes what a well-qualified mountaineer is? It would have to operate in every country that a climber might climb a mountain in, of course.

Honestly, Nepal and Pakistan could form a committee of experts solely on the subject of 8000ers and Himalayan climbing.

Getting your permit is a matter of having records if your climbs maintained and somehow validated. The benefit is twofold: the climbers from that region get formalized recognition for their expertise and this would start the bare minimum process for maintaining records for the sport as a whole.

I really don't mind when seasoned pros go for summits and spend half their year living in a mountain, and Everest is the tallest.

Your plan is a drastic action, Everest will likely never go the way of Gangkhar Puensum.

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Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008


Yeah there's nothing wrong with selling access to cultural wonders to rich people because it's your country's only source of revenue.

Nope.

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