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tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





I was going to put this in the fix it fast thread but I think it will neither be fast nor is it a short question, so solo thread it is.

Situation - I have water coming into my house at the bottom of the top piece of trim around an exterior door.

Here is my roof, I don't think it has any leaks, the top middle edge of the picture is roughly where the door is:



This is where I think the water is coming in from, it is running over/splashing from the shingles and coming down the backside of that gutter and running down the wall into the top of the door in the following picture:


The brown line on the upper left of the door is where I think all the water is coming in at:


Here is the interior damage:




Album link with bigger + additional pictures.

My questions are essentially, does everyone (from the internet) agree that my water intrusion problem is due to the gutter situation?

If yes, my plan it to get flashing and insert it under the shingles by that corner and have it come up 6" on the brick and then have the flashing terminate into the gutter, essentially a funnel to catch all the wall + splashing bullshit that occurs, I will also silicone caulk where the flashing meets the brick so that I don't get water intrusion behind the flashing. Does this sound like a good plan?

Now to fix the interior of the house, is there a good way for me to remove the rotten/wet wood and then replace it with good pieces sistered to the remaining good wood? Will it be easier/better/more correct to rip out the entire door framing and redo it all? It looks like the water damage extends halfway down the interior right side of the door, and covers the entire top of the door, the interior left side has been spared.

Finally, gently caress the POs for knowingly covering up this problem. The floor by the door had some water damage when I bought the house back in August but the inspection showed that it was totally dry so there shouldn't have been any current leaks. I'm guessing the fuckers painted over the trim and kept buckets/towels down to catch any potential drips as the water only makes it all the way inside to drip if there is very heavy and continuous rain (which is why my wife and I have only just noticed this now).

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SopWATh
Jun 1, 2000


There should be kickout flashing at the edge of the roof where the shingles meet the wall to kick water off the wall into the gutter.

The door frame should be replaced. I don't know enough about construction or structural engineering to tell you if using a sister stud is a good idea/bad idea.

SopWATh fucked around with this message at 21:30 on Feb 9, 2016

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Thanks for the flashing vocab there. Kickout flashing will be perfect, bought some today for hopeful install tomorrow.

My plan is to take more drywall off to see if the frame is connected to the ceiling. If it is I'll treat it as structural, if not I won't. Having looked at some other wall repair situations online you can sister studs and have them still be load bearing as long as you use the correct fasteners.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Got the kickout flashing installed last weekend, which was a bear because the shingles were essentially intermixed with the mortar from the brickwork, some lovely work prior for sure. Seemed to work during the light rain we got this week. Tested it today with a bucket up on the roof and all water was being channeled into the gutter with none coming down the wall to the door.



Moved on to looking at the inside this afternoon after I tested the outside work. Did a bit more demo work trying to figure out how to best tackle this job. I've got 1x3 small pieces at the top of the door as shims, then two stacked sheets of 1/2" plywood (the black strip on the picture), then 2x4s (2), next comes a 2x10 at least that's what I assume it is since I cannot measure the 2 side, and another probably 2x4 on top of that.

The 2 vertical 2x4s on the right I am assuming to be load bearing at this point which means I need to remove/replace with appropriate temporary jack in place or I need to remove the 4-5ft bad section and put in new wood properly sistered to the good wood above and below. I think the problem with sistering is that I don't have the space, due to the corner to the right, to get a drill in there to place the bolts I would need. Any suggestions?



Shot of the whole wall to give an idea of what I'm working with. At this point I'm assuming I'll need to remove all the drywall around the door and up close to the right edge of the door to the left, then all the drywall to the roof (9ft ceilings) so I can properly access the framing of the door in order to replace everything.

TheDon01
Mar 8, 2009




That 2x10 is a header for that door and channels all the weight above it into the jack studs on the side. Practicality everything you have uncovered there is load bearing and would kinda be a bear to replace. Not to say it's impossible to diy but you would have to support everything as you tear into it, you will most likely have to remove the door/jamb and rehang it after putting the studs in. It's not something you're going to knock out in an afternoon without prior framing and drywall mud/tape experience.

How many of those studs are you planning on replacing?

That uncovered stud on the far right is your king stud, it should go all the way to the top. Is that black on it just a bit of mold or is it rotten?

TheDon01 fucked around with this message at 02:36 on Mar 6, 2016

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





I am contemplating bringing on an acquaintance of mine, who does carpentry and has worked on his own home a lot, and paying them to assist/guide me for a Saturday for the framing portion and I can then tackle the drywall to wrap up the weekend.

My plan was to replace the king stud, and the stud to the left of it and then all of the 2x4s that are below the header. The stud/king stud on the left side should be fine as the water damage stops before getting to them. Obviously trying to replace the wood between header and top of door isn't going to be very feasible as I'm coming to realize (without taking the door out).

The black is just mold from what I can tell, as I cannot jam a screwdriver into any of the 2x wood, just the plywood black bullshit there. I still may need to tear it out though because I suspect there is rotten plywood/whatever sheathing would go between the outside brick and the framing and that should be replaced as well.

TheDon01
Mar 8, 2009




It's solid brick on the outside? That's gonna make things interesting replacing the plywood sheathing as you kinda need to attach it to the studs. And there might even be some sort of vapor barrier or housewrap on the other side of that ply. I've never tried building a wall from the outside in like that. You definitely want your buddy to help you out.

Edit: I just finished a similar project where the prev. owners put a hottub in a small non ventilated enclosed deck but windows instead of doors, also I had cedar siding so I just took the entire wall down and reframed, sheathed and wrapped everything. I wish you lots of luck, water damage is a massive pain in the rear end and usually turns into a bigger project as you dig deeper.

TheDon01 fucked around with this message at 04:11 on Mar 6, 2016

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Yeah you can sorta see it in the first post, that top left corner of the door (in the outside pics) is the top right corner on the inside.

Thanks, I'm coming to that realization for sure. I had started off removing the trim at the top of the door thinking I might get away with just replacing "a" piece of wood, some drywall, and new trim. I enjoy learning DIY skills so there is at least that silver lining to all of this.

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OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Your carpenter friend should be able to help you replace whatever studs and framing need done, but since you've found and remedied the root of the problem, you might be able to get away with just replacing the trim and door frame. Hanging a door in a new frame is a pain in the butt, but luckily if you want to take this opportunity to upgrade or replace your door with something that has better insulation/looks/security, that's actually a pretty easy process with a pre-hung door. You should be able to transplant your handle and deadbolt to the new one and save a few bucks.

Quick carpentry tip while you're doing all this, when pulling out nails with a hammer claw, bend it to the side and work your way out instead of pulling up like you would think. The claw dogs in to the nail and gives you better leverage, making things much easier. Also, get a small thin piece of scrap wood to place between the wall and the tool to add more leverage and protect the wall. A few different pry bars also help out a lot, start with the smallest and work it loose till you can jam a bigger one in there, and work it free from side to side.

If you have any exterior trim, get vinyl replacements, it never rots and lasts basically forever.

Good luck! I had a similar fight with a rotted window sill last year--it's always so much worse once you start digging in.

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