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RenegadeStyle1
Jun 7, 2005

Baby Come Back

Presumably itll bounce a few days after youve already sent the scammer portion back to him so he has your laptop and some extra money.

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SettingSun
Aug 10, 2013



That's just a classical cheque scam. If they sent you cheque with the incorrect amount the logical thing is to say you destroyed it and to send another.

Initio
Oct 29, 2007
!

The scam works because of how rules around ACH deposits and how clearing checks actually work.

The banks have to release funds to you sooner than they can actually validate that the check is legitimate. Since people would generally assume when the deposit shows up in their account that the check “cleared”, they figure it’s all good.

Later when the bank finds out the check was fraudulent, they take back their money from your account, possibly putting it in the negative. If you’ve wired the money on, sent gift cards, or whatever it’s essentially unrecoverable to you at that point.

Sydin
Oct 29, 2011

Another rainy day commute





Yeah quite honestly I doubt whoever's trying the scam is even interested in the Mac or would bother sending somebody to pick it up. The scam is basically:

1. Scammers write a fraudulent check for x amount. Let's use your example of $3850. There is no actual money in existence to back this up.
2. You cash the check, the bank has to release those funds to you immediately before they verify they actually exist. You send $3350 to the account they give you, you think you've pocketed $500
3. The account they asked you to send to is something they spooled up specifically for this scam, and as soon as they get the transfer they withdraw it all and close out the account.
4. Later, the bank realizes the check was fraudulent and resolves this by removing the full $3850 from your account plus whatever penalties/fees they want to apply. So you're out a couple thousand dollars, the scammers are long gone with their money, and the bank isn't really going to be that sympathetic if you complain to them about it.

Captain Monkey
Aug 23, 2007



I just got a brand new scam.

I received a text that reads - You just sent Miguel $15.99 if this is in error please click (not-that-obviously-fake Paypal link) to cancel or confirm.

Pretty sneaky, as I feel a lot of people would autoclick 'I didn't send anyone named Miguel money!!!'

Bloopsy
Jun 1, 2006

you have been visited by the Tasty Garlic Bread. you will be blessed by having good Garlic Bread in your life time, but only if you comment "ty garlic bread" in the thread below

Nm, beaten badly.

goatsestretchgoals
Jun 4, 2011

in soviet russia, you shove robot

Captain Monkey posted:

I just got a brand new scam.

I received a text that reads - You just sent Miguel $15.99 if this is in error please click (not-that-obviously-fake Paypal link) to cancel or confirm.

Pretty sneaky, as I feel a lot of people would autoclick 'I didn't send anyone named Miguel money!!!'

Even if you back out immediately, the URL probably has ?sucker=someIDcode in it, so enjoy getting even more spam texts in the near future.

Handen
Jun 29, 2003

HNNNNNNNNG.


Sydin posted:

Yeah quite honestly I doubt whoever's trying the scam is even interested in the Mac or would bother sending somebody to pick it up. The scam is basically:

1. Scammers write a fraudulent check for x amount. Let's use your example of $3850. There is no actual money in existence to back this up.
2. You cash the check, the bank has to release those funds to you immediately before they verify they actually exist. You send $3350 to the account they give you, you think you've pocketed $500
3. The account they asked you to send to is something they spooled up specifically for this scam, and as soon as they get the transfer they withdraw it all and close out the account.
4. Later, the bank realizes the check was fraudulent and resolves this by removing the full $3850 from your account plus whatever penalties/fees they want to apply. So you're out a couple thousand dollars, the scammers are long gone with their money, and the bank isn't really going to be that sympathetic if you complain to them about it.

Awesome, thanks for the explanation. That makes complete sense and now I get to gently caress around with the guy. :q:

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



Handen posted:

Awesome, thanks for the explanation. That makes complete sense and now I get to gently caress around with the guy. :q:

Wait for the check to come but don't cash it (obviously). "Fall" for the same scam again, and send the next guys the check you received.

TheParadigm
Dec 10, 2009



Handen posted:

Awesome, thanks for the explanation. That makes complete sense and now I get to gently caress around with the guy. :q:

The basic stinger is 'you can forge CERTIFIED' checks too or just lie and say they're cashiers or whatever.
So its basically the same reverse check fraud scam.


I did see a fun reversal of this on one of the youtube anti-scammers/scambaiters (i forgot which one) where they got the scammer to pay them. The reason it worked was they used paypal, and sent it as the wrong kind of link (scammer pays instead of recieves) and they clicked it on autopilot

Leon Sumbitches
Mar 27, 2010

Dr. Leon Adoso Sumbitches (prounounced soom-'beh-cheh) (born January 21, 1935) is heir to the legendary Adoso family oil fortune.







Buglord

Just got a new (to me) scam: the fake online store I was sent to through Google Shopping.

I'm looking for a particular knife set and was poking around on google shopping to see if there were any better deals than the one I had found. I saw a too-good-to-be-true price at a no-name URL and clicked through (I have adblockers and cookie blockers and all kinds of privacy screen stuff set up plus chrome didn't throw a warning) and found enough weirdness I thought I'd post about it.

First, there's a contact name, email, phone number, and address at the bottom.

Second, their return policy seems to be copy/pasted from a legit e-seller. They changed one of the brand names to their url, but left the original in several times.

Third, leaving the knife set I clicked through to and looking at their wider merchandise, it is the most eclectic grouping I've seen in etail. Futons to clogs to a bucket of paint to some odd Scandinavian wooden sculpture. Most things "for sale" have <NAME?> as their name.

I guess this is all set up to take advantage of people who use google shopping. By setting unbelievably low prices, they can get on google shopping's radar, and then sucker people into a too-good-to-be-true offer.

Now to see if google has the ability to report a schemer scammer...

Tunicate
May 15, 2012





Handen posted:


So what's the con here? I get a "certified cheque" for ~$4k, cash it, and what happens from there?


There was a fun little reversal there with a guy who got a junk mail 'fake' check cashed it and actually got the money

https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Playing-With-Money-How-a-95-093-35-junk-mail-2588766.php

Tunicate fucked around with this message at 00:10 on Jul 23, 2021

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

Yeah the check thing is an old one

https://www.doj.nh.gov/consumer/dont-cash-that-check/check-overpayment.htm

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




How/where the gently caress do I get good shoes? I just want whatever Blackwater wears (rather, the non-nazi equivalent) and I'm willing to pay for it but I am so loving sick of "good" shoes being $TEXAS and lasting as long as a pair of sneakers from Wal-Mart because it's all rubber and leather loosely stitched and glued together to last for a year or until they get wet. :(

Do they make steel-toed canvas boots? Or fibreglass-toed canvas boots? Why the gently caress can't I get water-durable boots!?
It's 2021 and I am typing this post from a public bus on a supercomputer that fits into a large cargo pocket but for some reason, boots I can get wet, dry out without consequence and wear again are just not possible to manufacture??

I ask the scam thread because my last internet search has left me with endless Facebook ads for Indestructable brand shoes, a blatant scan if ever I seen one.

shame on an IGA
Apr 8, 2005

Get into shit, let it out like diarrhea
Got burnt once, that was only gonorrhea




Tubgoat posted:

How/where the gently caress do I get good shoes? I just want whatever Blackwater wears (rather, the non-nazi equivalent) and I'm willing to pay for it but I am so loving sick of "good" shoes being $TEXAS and lasting as long as a pair of sneakers from Wal-Mart because it's all rubber and leather loosely stitched and glued together to last for a year or until they get wet. :(

Do they make steel-toed canvas boots? Or fibreglass-toed canvas boots? Why the gently caress can't I get water-durable boots!?
It's 2021 and I am typing this post from a public bus on a supercomputer that fits into a large cargo pocket but for some reason, boots I can get wet, dry out without consequence and wear again are just not possible to manufacture??

I ask the scam thread because my last internet search has left me with endless Facebook ads for Indestructable brand shoes, a blatant scan if ever I seen one.

Try these, I work in wastewater treatment and these have held up 2 years so far plus the slip-resistance is god level beyond anything else I've ever tried. They're basically spiderman shoes.

https://www.srmax.com/mens-shoes/products/SRM2660

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




shame on an IGA posted:

Try these, I work in wastewater treatment and these have held up 2 years so far plus the slip-resistance is god level beyond anything else I've ever tried. They're basically spiderman shoes.

https://www.srmax.com/mens-shoes/products/SRM2660

No joke, my eyes lit up when I read "wastewater." Thank you for the recommendation and also/especially your service. :love:

shame on an IGA
Apr 8, 2005

Get into shit, let it out like diarrhea
Got burnt once, that was only gonorrhea




there's also bootchat happening right now in TFR general chat thread, they may have suggests as well.

In fact that's where I thought we were posting the real scam is having the same derails going in 4 subforums at once

goatsestretchgoals
Jun 4, 2011

in soviet russia, you shove robot

shame on an IGA posted:

Try these, I work in wastewater treatment and these have held up 2 years so far plus the slip-resistance is god level beyond anything else I've ever tried. They're basically spiderman shoes.

https://www.srmax.com/mens-shoes/products/SRM2660

Thank you for this, I just came close to eating poo poo on our oily machine shop floor so this is extremely relevant.

PhazonLink
Jul 17, 2010


there's a boots thread in You Look Like poo poo; supposedly the "good" goon fashion forum.

you should probabaly just go tot a physical store that does work wear, pretty sure brands have their own store fronts so you dont gamble on amazon or whatever loving you over.

nonathlon
Jul 9, 2004
And yet, somehow, now it's my fault ...

Tubgoat posted:

I ask the scam thread because my last internet search has left me with endless Facebook ads for Indestructable brand shoes, a blatant scan if ever I seen one.

You have my sympathy. About a month ago I clicked on a Facebook ad for what turned out to be vastly overpriced masks. Now every third post on FB is an ad for masks, all promising to do the things that other masks don't. I hide them, but there's apparently a machine generating new mask startups.

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




Handen posted:

Can someone tell me about the scam that some guy on kijiji is trying to run on me?

Details:

I'm selling an old iMac on kijiji for $350. Someone ostensibly from Saskatoon (I'm in Alberta) messaged me and asked me to hold onto it, saying he'll be moving to my city in a few weeks, and in the initial message said he'll even pay $50 extra for the hassle of me holding onto it. No alarm bells are going off at this point.

Next message he says he wants to instruct "his people" to send a certified cheque for $400 to me this week. Okay... I'm still listening but his broken english and strange addition of some kind of agency in charge of the money are starting to make me question this transaction. Whatever, nobody else seems interested in it so I'll see where this goes. I reply with my work address and tell him to send away.

The next message was a huge loving wall of text to say that the person in charge of the money "accidentally" sent me a certified cheque for something like $3850, and he's now asking me to cash it, remove my portion, and then somehow transfer the rest of that money to the company in charge of his move from Saskatoon to Alberta in a few weeks. Oh and he'll even bump my portion up by $100 to an even $500.

At this point I'm 9000% sure this is a scam, but I've been racking my brain trying to figure out how it plays out from here if I keep agreeing to his continually increasing demands.

So what's the con here? I get a "certified cheque" for ~$4k, cash it, and what happens from there?

Edit: I just told a coworker about this and it turns out he had been contacted by the same number about a week ago, trying the exact same scam, in all the exact same copy+paste wording. He told him off, but I haven't yet. Now to turn this into a scamming the scammer situation. :q:

This is like the second oldest scam in the book how have you not heard of it

One Nut Wonder
Mar 17, 2009


One time I legit got a fake check in the mail, with MICR numbers blurred out, and an actual printout of the insane email message. Varying fonts and colors, and underlines, and italics the works. I don't know how they got my name and address, but it's one of my prized possessions. It's in a box somewhere.

It was the old, "cash it and send us $x." But the MICR numbers were so hosed that it would never read. So A for effort, F for execution. Why send a check you couldn't even cash? Maybe Andy Kaufman came back for one last joke.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




Y'all probably heard this one already but bear with me.

A couple mornings ago (I'm nitecrew IRL), an African-American-sounding dude calls (from like a 20-digit number starting with 01) the front desk of the hotel I work at claiming to be a representative of "Mr. Patel, the owner" (ala John Peters, You Know, The Farmer). Bad luck for him our hotel is owned by Jews, not Indians. Warning number two (the name was number one, the caller ID number zero) that this was a scam was that, upon learning my name, he proceeded to use it ~twice as much as a high-end appliance salesman would. Lol. He asked me to take down a purported tracking number for FedEx International and after I asked what my responsibility to this tracking number was, he hung up.

Last night, ~3:30 local, an Indian-accented man called claiming to be "Mr. Patel, the owner." Lol. I was out of patience so loving with him didn't occur to me and I just hung up.

NOTES: A for effort. Calling a random hotel and in thickly-accented English claiming you own the place is reasonably plausible in America, especially to an underpaid wage slave that doesn't know the hotel owners' names but is vaguely aware that craploads of wealthy Indian failsons own absolute loving tons of metropolitan infrastructure in English-speaking countries.

What is the scam here? I assume it's "get a hotel clerk to agree to receive a usuriously-priced parcel or no parcel and bilk the hotel for multiple thousand dollars in fraudulent shipping charges for a package that may exist," but I can't really figure out step 2 or 3.

Or maybe he is called Mr. Patel, The Owner because he pwns noobz. :shrug: + :roflolmao:

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006

BLITHERING IDIOT AND HARDCORE DURIAN APOLOGIST. LET ME TELL YOU WHY THIS SHIT DON'T STINK EVEN THOUGH WE ALL KNOW IT DOES BECAUSE I'M SUPER CULTURED.


An “urgent communication from the owner” is probably going to end in a “special assignment” using company money to send gift cards, Western Union type transfers, or cryptocurrency to the scammer. If they’re real nasty they might tell the employee to front the money and it’ll be reimbursed.

How they get from the start to the finish is up to the scammer, but it might be something like “oh no, a very important package is lost, you have to take $5,000 out of the cash drawer and send it to me, the owner, so we can replace the contents.”

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




Lmao, that would've been amazing, now I wish I'd stayed on the line.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Tubgoat posted:

What is the scam here? I assume it's "get a hotel clerk to agree to receive a usuriously-priced parcel or no parcel and bilk the hotel for multiple thousand dollars in fraudulent shipping charges for a package that may exist," but I can't really figure out step 2 or 3.

Usually they want to use your hotel as a dropoff point for stuff they bought with a stolen card. Sometimes they'll make a reservation, see that the package was received, make an excuse to cancel the reservation and pay to have you reship it. It could very well be something different, but that's the shipping scam I hear about from front desk workers.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




MisterOblivious posted:

Usually they want to use your hotel as a dropoff point for stuff they bought with a stolen card. Sometimes they'll make a reservation, see that the package was received, make an excuse to cancel the reservation and pay to have you reship it. It could very well be something different, but that's the shipping scam I hear about from front desk workers.

Thanks! That would have been MAD funny because they were calling at hours when no reservations can be made or check-ins processed.

Eric the Mauve
May 8, 2012

Making you happy for a buck since 199X


The last hotel I worked at's policy was no reshipping packages to a different address. Your options in that scenario were come pick it up yourself (showing photo ID) or pay to have it returned to sender.

The scammer could still show up in person to take the package in that case, but wouldn't likely get away with it more than once.

That was years ago though, I don't know how or if policies have changed as the arts of scamming and thievery have evolved.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




I'm not sure if we send them on, but we frequently do have packages sent to guests who have stayed here, I'm not responsible for them, though. :shrug:

Pekinduck
May 10, 2008


Obtaining employee W2s to fraudulently claim tax refunds is another common scheme.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




Pekinduck posted:

Obtaining employee W2s to fraudulently claim tax refunds is another common scheme.

THAT would be funny.

So, another call, this time from a real-ish phone number and the dude barely spoke English and had a thick Latino accent. It was almost impossible to understand him. I'd've hosed with him some had I not been profoundly busy at the time. "Mr. Patel" again. :roflolmao:

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Tubgoat posted:

I'm not sure if we send them on, but we frequently do have packages sent to guests who have stayed here, I'm not responsible for them, though. :shrug:

Yeah, receiving and holding packages is a normal thing. That's why y'all are targeted.

All it takes is one employee loving up and some scammer gets a few $thousand in stolen laptops or whatever. Probably GPUs these days. ID for package or return to sender is about all you can do. Scammers know they can take advantage of the normalcy of receiving packages and the poor training of the day people handling them.

Like I said before, they **might** be trying a different scam, 'cause they called a NA.

I'm just guessing it's the usual scam but they wanted you to leave a note to "hold it for "Mr. Patel, the "owner"" and then "Mr. Patel's assistant" would come to pick up the package and you, or the FDA on days, was just supposed to ignore the wrong name on the package, and any ID policy if you have one, qand hand it over to "the "owner's" assistant." That, or the "owner's assistant" would contact your hotel later with a shipping label to reship the package.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013




Makes sense. Most of the folks here got their heads screwed on straight, though.

I'm really hoping we get one who sounds like Borat next. :allears:

Sydin
Oct 29, 2011

Another rainy day commute





There was some big, pretty sophisticated phishing campaign this week against a handful of big Youtubers, which convinced a bunch of them to delete their own channels. They even managed to trick Jim Browning, who's whole channel is about internet scams and how to recognize them. Just a reminder that nobody is "smart enough" to never fall for this kind of thing, it's all about how much effort the scammer is willing to put in and what state of mind you happen to be caught in when you're hit with it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIWV5fSaUB8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6e43Rz__YM

Rabite
Apr 13, 2002

Dynamiet Rab

I heard there was some sort of scam involving gas stations and scammers claiming to be higher up the chain and needing to know how much cash was in the till, and have them make purchases or potentially coming in and robbing them.

Original_Z
Jun 14, 2005
Z so good

I used to listen to prank call podcasts where they would call random businesses and claim to be from corporate and the amount of stupid poo poo they'd get the workers to do was pretty baffling. They called several 7-11s, saying that some stores received some bad coca cola for recall and the only way to confirm it was to put some mentos in the bottle and see if it caused a reaction or not. So many stores followed through with it or even more absurd requests, like they had to test the circuit breakers to make sure they were working. I'd imagine that if they had more nefarious objectives they could have easily been successful scammers.

Red Oktober
May 24, 2006

wiggly eyes!





Original_Z posted:

I used to listen to prank call podcasts where they would call random businesses and claim to be from corporate and the amount of stupid poo poo they'd get the workers to do was pretty baffling. They called several 7-11s, saying that some stores received some bad coca cola for recall and the only way to confirm it was to put some mentos in the bottle and see if it caused a reaction or not. So many stores followed through with it or even more absurd requests, like they had to test the circuit breakers to make sure they were working. I'd imagine that if they had more nefarious objectives they could have easily been successful scammers.

Oh absolutely - check out the strip search phone scam, which had a good film Compliance made about it.

SettingSun
Aug 10, 2013



Sydin posted:

There was some big, pretty sophisticated phishing campaign this week against a handful of big Youtubers, which convinced a bunch of them to delete their own channels. They even managed to trick Jim Browning, who's whole channel is about internet scams and how to recognize them. Just a reminder that nobody is "smart enough" to never fall for this kind of thing, it's all about how much effort the scammer is willing to put in and what state of mind you happen to be caught in when you're hit with it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIWV5fSaUB8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6e43Rz__YM

This scam was spearphishing taken to a meticulous method of detail. Every step of it was entirely plausible and as Jim Browning notes, actual Google's steps to fix this were almost identical to what the scammer had him do in the first place. The only real markers of the scam were that the email the scammer contacted from was only 85% right, and when taken off script the scammer lost their fine grasp of English. Truly nuts.

Pekinduck
May 10, 2008


SettingSun posted:

This scam was spearphishing taken to a meticulous method of detail. Every step of it was entirely plausible and as Jim Browning notes, actual Google's steps to fix this were almost identical to what the scammer had him do in the first place. The only real markers of the scam were that the email the scammer contacted from was only 85% right, and when taken off script the scammer lost their fine grasp of English. Truly nuts.

One thing that drives me nuts is lots of companies use weird alternate domains for stuff instead of their main one. I get emails which are legitimate but the link is something like companysignupgateway.net instead of company.com

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Domus
May 7, 2007

Kidney Buddies


I just got the best scam phone call. In a text-to-speech voice, I was informed that they had “Discovered my drug carrier” and knew it “was under your name”. I had to laugh out loud. Something is so hilarious about that phrasing. Like the drug guy was taking reservations. Or kept extensive records on who asked him to mule what drug. “Let’s see…Smith….Smith…ah you had the ten pounds of pot to Dallas? It will be a small wait, we are preparing the table right now.”

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