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Fil5000
Jun 23, 2003

HOLD ON GUYS I'M POSTING ABOUT INTERNET ROBOTS


Cast_No_Shadow posted:

One of my first jobs was ringing people to try and hand out lost money.

In my country if a company has money they don't own and can't find an owner for andit just sits there it amasses a punitive rate of interest to encourage them to find its owner quickly.

It usually occurs because someone died with some forgotten account and no one ever claimed it and whoops it's 30 years later and costing a fortune.

While a really fun job, ring folks up and give them money, it was very hard to get to a point I could do that. Cause it sure as hell sounds like a scam when I rang and asked them to give me information.

https://youtu.be/03K1cR9qQZM

Was this you

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Cast_No_Shadow
Jun 8, 2010

The Republic of Luna Equestria is a huge, socially progressive nation, notable for its punitive income tax rates. Its compassionate, cynical population of 714m are ruled with an iron fist by the dictatorship government, which ensures that no-one outside the party gets too rich.



Basically yes, only I couldn't tell you it was a massive yacht, or massive yacht money until you proved who you were to me.

Volmarias
Dec 31, 2002

I'm sure I'll think of something.

Mulaney Power Move posted:

I do surveys on behalf of federal and local governments, mostly public health, and most have a texting or CATI component so telephone scams interest me.

One project in particular that has had terrible response rates is this CDC study we are doing. It's an RDD sample of 15 states selected to participate in a push-to-web experiment and at best we could only match like 25% of phone numbers to addresses, so we can't mail a survey invite with a web link because it's not cost effective.

At first the design was to call people and get permission to text them a survey link (not my idea, I wasn't on the proposal). I think the RR for that ended up being like less than 5%. Most people just don't answer. We found we had to rotate the outbound number 3 times a day because it would only take a few hours to get flagged as spam. The cost per completed survey was ridiculous because CATI is so expensive.

So then the CDC was like gently caress it, just text people without their permission and out of a sample size of about 14,000 we only got like 200 completed surveys and that was after months of testing to make the texts as legit as possible and avoid getting them blocked by carriers. The good thing though is it only costs a few cents per message vs. spending thousands for all the CATI dialing to get one complete.

I remember throughout testing we were all like, "yeah i still wouldn't click this link."

Oh and the incentive was a $5 e-card. Survey is like 20 minutes.

Worst project I have ever been on.

On the plus side, at least you're getting something, as low quality as it is, and you're actually doing something that is useful to society, while I make a billionaire slightly richer.

JohnCompany
Jan 16, 2015

this sentence no verb



Has anyone else seen a new thing on WhatsApp that must be some sort of scam? I've been getting a message from some number, usually UK-based, that I don't know, where the WhatsApp photo is a stereotypically attractive Asian woman. The first message is something like "Long time no see, [random name]" or "Following up on yesterday, [random name]." The first one I didn't realize it was a scam, so I told them they had the wrong number. They then said "Sorry to bother you" and started talking about themselves and asking who I was. What's their angle? Is this just some spin on a honey trap?

wizzardstaff
Apr 6, 2018

Zorch! Splat! Pow!


End goal could be anything from scamming you out of money to convincing you to click on malware, but the first, biggest hurdle is starting a conversation. Someone who replies to a text, even to say "sorry wrong number", is infinitely more likely to be a mark than someone who doesn't.

Captain Monkey
Aug 23, 2007



Yeah, one of the earliest scam calls I remember is some guy being like 'Hey is (relatively uncommon random name) there?'

With the response, no matter what you said being, 'Oh well maybe you can help me...' before launching into the spiels.

Crust First
May 1, 2013

Wrong lads.


I've seen some people end up in cryptocurrency related scams that start like that. Someone (often an attractive woman('s picture)) "wrong number" texts them, they start talking about investing somehow, convince the person to "invest" in cryptocurrency mining or forex or whatever, and then they keep all the money.

Inceltown
Aug 6, 2019



The trick with these is to reply with hello.jpg. You will get ignored or sworn at and ignored.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




I reply with pigballs.jpg just trying to brighten someone's day, maybe change their whole life

happyhippy
Feb 21, 2005

Playing games, watching movies, owning goons. 'sup


Pillbug

I got one a week ago where the guy on the other end just asks me for my customer order instantly. As in 'Hello there, can you please give me your customer number'.
When I said they phoned me, he acted confused and said 'Ok, so whats your name so I can search on it'.
I said I didn't trust this, and ended the call.
This way of getting private info would fool a lot I would think, instead of the 'hey remember me?' ones.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


You can try replying "Alaye" to txt scammers. It's basically a codeword for "I'm a scammer too, stop wasting our time." "Omo ode" if you want to call them a dumbass.

https://www.legit.ng/1031944-8-insults-yoruba-mothers-use-will-reset-brain.html

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

I got a an email with a pdf attachment from "Get Bill" and afraid to click it. I think it might be for an online baseball game I play but am not loving with that attachment to find out and the email was:

Hello BiggerBoat.

Please find attached paymеnt invoice for your reference.

Thanks and Rеgards,

Marlon Hayes

with no logo or any other info.

ANyone?

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Seems like a basic invoice scam hoping to get paid for nothing.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

StormDrain posted:

Seems like a basic invoice scam hoping to get paid for nothing.

That's what I thought too or one of those click on the link/attachment and get hosed type of things. I googled Get Bill and it seems semi legit but I can't tell. Just about everything I pay for is linked to a credit card or my bank.

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007





Sounds like one of those Ugandan movie knockoffs of Tarantino.

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mllaneza
Apr 28, 2007


Veteran, Bermuda Triangle Expeditionary Force, 1993-1952





Cast_No_Shadow posted:

One of my first jobs was ringing people to try and hand out lost money.

In my country if a company has money they don't own and can't find an owner for andit just sits there it amasses a punitive rate of interest to encourage them to find its owner quickly.

It usually occurs because someone died with some forgotten account and no one ever claimed it and whoops it's 30 years later and costing a fortune.

While a really fun job, ring folks up and give them money, it was very hard to get to a point I could do that. Cause it sure as hell sounds like a scam when I rang and asked them to give me information.

I had a similar experience. Back at the hosed up little telemarketing company, we once had a customer that wanted to clean up their customer database; delete bad records, update names, find SPOCs at large organization, and the like. The catch was, the product was extremely high-end digital projectors back in the late 90s when those went for serious coin. Just short of 20% of our total outbound call volume was someone assuming we were thieves casing the joint. We had to add a resolution code for that a couple of days in to the project.

I don't blame 'em, those projectors were 5-figgies worth of in-demand electronics that came in its own carrying case with wheels and a handle.

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