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EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



Sorry I’ve been dodging your calls, Mr. Likely.

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Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


EL BROMANCE posted:

Sorry I’ve been dodging your calls, Mr. Likely.

A Likely story.

Fil5000
Jun 23, 2003

HOLD ON GUYS I'M POSTING ABOUT INTERNET ROBOTS


Absurd Alhazred posted:

I'm Scam Likely.

Oh, of the Conneticut Likelys?

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


Fil5000 posted:

Oh, of the Conneticut Likelys?

No, the Boston Likelys. Common mistake.

BigDave
Jul 14, 2009

Taste the High Country


Absurd Alhazred posted:

No, the Boston Likelys. Common mistake.

Ah, yes, founder of the Likely Real Estate Company.

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


BigDave posted:

Ah, yes, founder of the Likely Real Estate Company.

"Our Prices Are Credible!"

Depressio111117
Oct 18, 2014

A whole world of imagination beyond the oompah band.

Absurd Alhazred posted:

"Our Prices Are Credible!"

:golfclap:

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

ToxicSlurpee posted:

That sort of thing can be the worst. Before cell phones the land line number I had I guess had belonged to people who had a tendency to not pay their debts. I guess they were the type that would get credit cards, max them out, never pay them back, then change all their details. Like they'd move, get a new phone number, and whatever. I got so many calls I eventually just turned my ringer off. I got real sick of saying "they don't live here stop calling." It's like hey guys I've literally never met those people stop bothering me about their debts.

I didn't find out details about them until I bitched about it at work and one of the guys I worked with apparently happened to know them. I guess they'd both been in jail at least twice so I'm like yeah, great people those ones.

Wouldn't changing your own phone number have been an option to stop the callers? I'm not saying the best option but it would seem better than turning off your ringer (effectively DOS-ing yourself).

Proteus Jones
Feb 28, 2013





Hippie Hedgehog posted:

Wouldn't changing your own phone number have been an option to stop the callers? I'm not saying the best option but it would seem better than turning off your ringer (effectively DOS-ing yourself).

You'd have to weigh that against having to update *every one* with the new number. Since this is "Before cell phones", that would be a HUGE pain in the rear end. I remember having to do that when I moved just 10 miles in the mid-90s to a new town. There's no other way than contacting directly, one at a time.

I'd just turn off the ringer at that point and screen via answering machine as well.

Eric the Mauve
May 8, 2012

Making you happy for a buck since 199X


Plus the fact that when you change your number there's an excellent chance the new number will turn out to also have formerly belonged to someone who wasn't in the habit of paying their bills and/or was in the habit of using their phone to sign up for harvesting promotions by the dozens.

I just don't answer the phone if it's not a number that's already in my contacts. I think that's what most people do.

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



I canceled my land line years ago.

JacquelineDempsey
Aug 6, 2008


Super tangential, but when I moved into my first apartment 20 years ago, my landline had the same or a very close number to Busta Rhymes's old digits. I'm not sure who was more confused, me or the guys on the other end. Kinda makes me wish I still had that number, I could have tons of fun with scammers.

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



Ah gently caress, I have super vague memories of hearing a story recently (I don't *think* it was in here, but on a radio show or something) where one hip hop guy was attempted to be scammed by someone pretending to be another famous rapper. It got pretty far along too until something tipped them off. I wish I could remember who it was, but maybe someone else will remember it. It was pretty interesting.

MightyJoe36
Dec 29, 2013

:minnie: Cat Army :minnie:


Collateral Damage posted:

I canceled my land line years ago.

I would have, but it comes bundled with my cable/internet. My land line number is the one I give out when I don't want people to call me.

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


Oh, wow! The FBI EXECUTIVE Director is emailing me?! Oh, boy!

goatsestretchgoals
Jun 4, 2011



Counterpoint: You used to be a mod on the SA forums. FBI/SS emails should be nothing new!

504
Feb 2, 2016

by R. Guyovich


Sure isn't for Aatrek.

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


goatsestretchgoals posted:

Counterpoint: You used to be a mod on the SA forums. FBI/SS emails should be nothing new!

To my knowledge they only contact the site owner.

goatsestretchgoals
Jun 4, 2011



probably better for your long term mental health re: aatrek

also :):respek::) and no offense meant, was trying to set you up for an alley-oop

goatsestretchgoals fucked around with this message at 06:58 on Mar 7, 2018

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



The other day I almost clicked on an email from PaypaI

That's a capital "i", not a lowercase "L"

ilmucche
Mar 16, 2016




Absurd Alhazred posted:

To my knowledge they only contact the site owner.

Better open it just to be sure. Could be important!

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

I got an email from a former client - one from my regular job and someone who I've also freelanced for - and it was just link, which I did not click, and a really odd subject line. Looks to me like someone hijacked her email and is phishing I guess.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008

EVERYTHING I TYPE IS UTTERLY WORTHLESS


BiggerBoat posted:

I got an email from a former client - one from my regular job and someone who I've also freelanced for - and it was just link, which I did not click, and a really odd subject line. Looks to me like someone hijacked her email and is phishing I guess.

We're gonna need a bigger bot.

Sir_Lagsalot
May 6, 2007

Connection error


BiggerBoat posted:

I got an email from a former client - one from my regular job and someone who I've also freelanced for - and it was just link, which I did not click, and a really odd subject line. Looks to me like someone hijacked her email and is phishing I guess.

Unless you know the email address is one they use, it's more likely spammers harvested the info from social media and set up the account to match. I get emails from time to time with the name of friends/relatives trying to get me to open links, but it's never from the actual address they use. The subject is always something vague like "I thought you might appreciate this".

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

Yeah something's going on. Says

"answer.c4d-global.com" for the link and "BULK" in the subject line.

I sure as poo poo aint clicking it anyway. The woman's name is correct but she would certainly put a subject or a message in there

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



I would tell her, by a text or something. We had someone hijack a works email here and it’s crafty to the point where it set a rule to auto delete any new incoming email too, so anyone telling us it was spamming was sent straight to trash.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Sir_Lagsalot posted:

Unless you know the email address is one they use, it's more likely spammers harvested the info from social media and set up the account to match. I get emails from time to time with the name of friends/relatives trying to get me to open links, but it's never from the actual address they use. The subject is always something vague like "I thought you might appreciate this".

I get that every other day or so, mostly "from" the same three friends who are on Facebook a lot.

SUPERMAN'S GAL PAL
Feb 21, 2006

Holy Moly! DARKSEID IS!


Came home from work to find an eBay purchase just four hours earlier I hadn’t made. eBay reversed it right quick and I changed all my associated passwords. What I find funny is the unauthorized purchase was a cheap item related to something I did buy a couple days before, but there were some pricey computer processing parts in my watch list and recently viewed.

Is that a typical eBay scam these days where they gain account access, do a “test” buy to see if the fraudulent activity is noticed, then go hog wild with more expensive items?

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007





A similar test strategy was used with stolen credit cards, so it makes sense that it would be adapted to a new environment.

504
Feb 2, 2016

by R. Guyovich


How does that work?

Small purchase, not picked up, buy huge?

Why take the risk the small purchase will be noticed?

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007





Previously you'd test that it was a valid number and then go nuts because the victim wouldn't know until the card was declined when it was over limit or the statement came at the end of the month. There may be enough people who only check when the bill is due to make it work even today.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008

EVERYTHING I TYPE IS UTTERLY WORTHLESS


Typically the financial institution picks it up as suspicious activity before the customer does these days unless someone local took the actual card and is making purchases in your hometown. Otherwise the sudden change in activity and location is usually caught and they freeze the card until they can contact you.

Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Your brokebrain sin is absolved...go and shitpost no more!


504 posted:

How does that work?

Small purchase, not picked up, buy huge?

Why take the risk the small purchase will be noticed?

i don't work in that field but cc fraud prevention works partially on the idea of locality. purchases that are similar to recent purchases are considered less questionable than ones that are dissimilar. tge scammer in this case is hoping to manufacture a trail of "similar" purchases, to bridge the gap between whatever item OP purchased and whatever items a person can buy on eBay that provide the most bang for the buck. it's classic "try to hide from scrutiny" stuff imo

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




I tried to delete my eBay account today and it wouldn't let me because I had "open listings." My last purchase was over 10 years ago and I was never a seller :/

Red Oktober
May 24, 2006

wiggly eyes!





Lutha Mahtin posted:

i don't work in that field but cc fraud prevention works partially on the idea of locality. purchases that are similar to recent purchases are considered less questionable than ones that are dissimilar. tge scammer in this case is hoping to manufacture a trail of "similar" purchases, to bridge the gap between whatever item OP purchased and whatever items a person can buy on eBay that provide the most bang for the buck. it's classic "try to hide from scrutiny" stuff imo

Yes, this is it.

Normal purchases = ok
Different type of purchase, same location = ok
Different purchase, different location = not ok
Similar purchase, different location = ok

So when you purchase a similar product for a new location, it goes through. And you can now make a ‘different ‘ purchase to that same location.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

Midjack posted:

A similar test strategy was used with stolen credit cards, so it makes sense that it would be adapted to a new environment.

Yep. I got a call a week ago about fraudulent activity on my CC asking me if I'd made any purchases in Orlando. I've only been between Jacksonville and St. Augustine for the last 3 or 4 months so, no. Oddly, the only registered charges were a couple of $1 service charges but not the purchases themselves.

Maybe someone was "testing" the card number but it both charges were at gas stations so not sure how that would work.

Phyzzle
Jan 26, 2008


BiggerBoat posted:

Yep. I got a call a week ago about fraudulent activity on my CC asking me if I'd made any purchases in Orlando. I've only been between Jacksonville and St. Augustine for the last 3 or 4 months so, no. Oddly, the only registered charges were a couple of $1 service charges but not the purchases themselves.

Maybe someone was "testing" the card number but it both charges were at gas stations so not sure how that would work.

Did you put air in tires using a credit card? Those machines are run by very small, incompetent operations that often report transactions happening wherever the owner is based.

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007





BiggerBoat posted:

Yep. I got a call a week ago about fraudulent activity on my CC asking me if I'd made any purchases in Orlando. I've only been between Jacksonville and St. Augustine for the last 3 or 4 months so, no. Oddly, the only registered charges were a couple of $1 service charges but not the purchases themselves.

Maybe someone was "testing" the card number but it both charges were at gas stations so not sure how that would work.

If you have the name, number, and expiration date it's staraightforward to generate the rest and write it to a blank card. Magstripe writers are available, and at a gas pump nobody is looking at the card to question a blank white card, hotel key, or reused to card with the wrong name and number being used.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

Phyzzle posted:

Did you put air in tires using a credit card? Those machines are run by very small, incompetent operations that often report transactions happening wherever the owner is based.

No. I haven't even been using that card.

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Konstantin
Jun 20, 2005
And the Lord said, "Look, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.

Pay at the pump gas charges usually show as a $1 preauthorization at first, then they replace it with the real amount. Gas pumps are also a target for fraudulent transactions because they are specifically exempt from the chip card transition until 2020.

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