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Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

BiggerBoat posted:

My grandma had trouble with her AC once in her car and the dude said she needed a compressor and every other loving thing. I took it to a shop and turns out [...]

So one mechanic had one opinion and the other mechanic had another opinion... Which one is the scammer? I mean you don't need to assume he was being intentionally dishonest when it's equally attributable to incompetence.

About van meat, is it usually fake/mislabeled, or just stolen? I know shops here have a lot of meat shoplifted from them so I suppose it has to go somewhere.

Hippie Hedgehog fucked around with this message at 15:57 on Feb 8, 2018

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Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

BiggerBoat posted:

Lots of sensitive, defensive car repair men here lately.

Why would you assume I'm a car repair man? Because I pointed out that, based on your statement of events, it would be prudent to apply Hanlon's razor? (That's "do not attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by incompetence" so people don't have to google it.)
With the detail you just added, I'm willing to concede he was indeed dishonest so let's just stop assuming people's motives and move on with the thread, shall we?

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

MightyJoe36 posted:

The majority of car buyers want it that way. They want to go into a dealer and pretend that they're a great "horse trader" and then brag to their buddies how they out-negotiated the sales guy and "got a deal." Same thing with Van Meat.

Absurd Alhazred posted:

No, that's actually because regulations make the alternative impossible. Nobody likes buying cars this way.

You're both forgetting that people are different. Some people are extroverts and like to haggle, some are introverts and hate it, some people are in between. Some people want control of the price, even if it's just the illusion of control, while some prefer to be offered a set price and either accept or reject it, and yet others' preference will vary according to the situation.

The US legal demand for car dealership seems weird, it must serve only to protect the auto industry's profit margins, not consumers' rights. I mean, most cars in other countries are also sold by dealers, even without such a law, so it's not like it would kill the auto industry to allow direct sales.

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

Zwabu posted:

Unclaimed Property Scam:

The scam is that certain companies, and there are a few well known ones that tend to change their names around a theme like "RS Clark Associates", will find people who have funds on the database, and if they can get a current address or phone number they will cold call you and offer to recover the funds for you. The scam is that they will charge you like ten percent of the funds whereas you could easily claim the funds yourself for a tiny administrative fee. The state websites with the database will usually have PDFs that you can print out from their site where you apply for the funds yourself, you will usually need some ID verification like copy of driver's license, your social etc.

All the scam companies do is mail you the forms that you could have printed out yourself, you still have to fill out and sign the forms and send it back to them, all they really do is mail it in for you. They make you feel as if they are doing you a service and you couldn't have claimed the funds without their help. The key is that they have you sign a form at the start of the process agreeing to contract their services to claim the funds in return for their fat cut, so if you figure out the scam and claim the money yourself they try to come after you for their cut anyway.

It's a thin line between providing a legitimate service, and a scam in this case. I guess it depends on the size on their fee? I mean, they are providing an actual service by notifying you that you have money to claim... If they are claiming or implying that the only way to get the money is through them, that's clearly a scam though.

Hippie Hedgehog fucked around with this message at 11:17 on Feb 26, 2018

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

ToxicSlurpee posted:

That sort of thing can be the worst. Before cell phones the land line number I had I guess had belonged to people who had a tendency to not pay their debts. I guess they were the type that would get credit cards, max them out, never pay them back, then change all their details. Like they'd move, get a new phone number, and whatever. I got so many calls I eventually just turned my ringer off. I got real sick of saying "they don't live here stop calling." It's like hey guys I've literally never met those people stop bothering me about their debts.

I didn't find out details about them until I bitched about it at work and one of the guys I worked with apparently happened to know them. I guess they'd both been in jail at least twice so I'm like yeah, great people those ones.

Wouldn't changing your own phone number have been an option to stop the callers? I'm not saying the best option but it would seem better than turning off your ringer (effectively DOS-ing yourself).

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

This sounded interesting. Phone scammers are going semi-automatic.

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/10/voice-phishing-scams-are-getting-more-clever/

Krebs posted:

The caller said her name was Jen Hansen, and began the call with what Curt described as “over-the-top courtesy.”

“It sounded like a very well-scripted Customer Service call, where they seem to be trying so hard to please that it seems disingenuous,” Curt recalled. “But honestly it still sounded very much like a real person, not like a text to speech voice which sounds robotic. This sounded VERY natural.”

Ms. Hansen proceeded to tell Curt that TD Bank was offering a credit monitoring service free for one month, and that he could cancel at any time. To enroll, he only needed to confirm his home mailing address.

“I’m mega paranoid and asked her to tell me what address I had on their file, knowing full well my home address can be found in a variety of ways,” Curt wrote in an email to this author. “She said, ‘One moment while I access that information.'”

After a short pause, a new voice came on the line.

“And here’s where I realized I was finally talking to a real human — a female with a slight French accent — who read me my correct address,” Curt recalled.
After another pause, Ms. Hansen’s voice came back on the line. While she was explaining that part of the package included free antivirus and anti-keylogging software, Curt asked her if he could opt-in to receive his credit reports while opting-out of installing the software.

“I’m sorry, can you repeat that?” the voice identifying itself as Ms. Hansen replied. Curt repeated himself. After another, “I’m sorry, can you repeat that,” Curt asked Ms. Hansen where she was from.

The voice confirmed what was indicated by the number displayed on his caller ID: That she was calling from Barrie, Ontario. Trying to throw the robot voice further off-script, Curt asked what the weather was like in Barrie, Ontario. Another Long pause. The voice continued describing the offered service.

“I asked again about the weather, and she said, ‘I’m sorry, I don’t have that information. Would you like me to transfer you to someone that does?’ I said yes and again the real person with a French accent started speaking, ignoring my question about the weather and saying that if I’d like to continue with the offer I needed to provide my date of birth. This is when I hung up and immediately called TD Bank.” No one from TD had called him, they assured him.

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

The only international phone scam that seems prevalent in Scandinavia is the "microsoft support" ransomware scam. It's such old hat by now, even Grandma knows to flip them off and hang up.
If robots took the jobs of those south asian call center employees, I'm not if I should be glad or sad. People here will just hang up on unknown English speakers.
If they started speaking the local language, it'd be a different story, then the robots would suddenly have the upper hand in terms of success rates, too.

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

The POS terminals I used to work with (touch screen thingies) could easily stand up to window cleaning detergent and a light scrubbing with a cloth. It was part of the daily closing routine and mandated by the local health inspectors.

Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

I guess I don't see it either. Good on you for trying to help! Also for not getting scammed or mugged.

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Hippie Hedgehog
Feb 19, 2007

Ever cuddled a hedgehog?

A round of golf applause for the man who comes out and proves himself an idiot for all the Internet to see, in order to educate and warn the masses about what a common scam looks like.

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