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therobit
Aug 19, 2008


The Lone Badger posted:

I think the government should give homeless people laptops. So they've got email and can look up opportunities etc.

Whoa. Hold on. You are going to take someone who's only problems are schizophrenia, homelessness, and a wicked heroin addiction and put them at risk of becoming GOONS? That seems a little unkind.

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therobit
Aug 19, 2008


bongwizzard posted:

I used to work for this super shady touring bridal tradeshow and after the first year we all demanded absurd raises. The owner gave in but slashed our crew budget so the production manager had to post CL adds to find a crew every weekend.

We ended up getting a Hells Angels dude one time and from then on we would just hire his entire chapter to do the show in that city.

I would read a thread and or many posts about Hells Angels doing a bridal show. Just sayin'.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


1000 Brown M and Ms posted:

Japan is surprisingly backward with a lot of their infrastructure. Most official stuff is still done by hand on paper rather than anything electronic. Banking is a bit of a pain in the rear end as well. Cash is mostly used for any transaction, even things like rent and insurance. I even knew an old guy over there that refused to use anything but cash. I'm not sure he even had a bank account. Very few ATMs outside of the post office will accept foreign cards (Cirrus/Maestro etc), and even then it's a crapshoot as to whether a card will work. I think a lot of it is because Japan is a very old country and they're very set in their ways, for better or worse.



Anyway, scams. I ran into a few when I visited Hong Kong, but at least I only really fell for one.

I was down at the waterfront and an Indian dude started talking to me. Seemed legit at first, but then he did a routing about being a yogi and giving him money for luck. I gave him $10HKD (~$1USD) so he would shut up, but he kept pressuring me so I walked away. I also went across the border to Shenzhen and while I was there bought a MicroSD card from a dude on the street, but it didn't work. Looked real legit though. Only cost about $10 so I wasn't too miffed.

Worst was when I went to Wan Chai with a dude I met at the hostel I was staying at. We were walking past a bar and some girls literally dragged us inside. They really wanted us to spend money on a strip show or to gently caress them, but all we did was buy them a drink. Sounds fine, until they gave us the bill when we left. Our drinks were about $40HKD each, but theirs were $400HKD each. That pissed us off, but we thought it would be a good idea to pay in case there were some dudes out the back that would gently caress us up if we bailed. Honestly, it could have been much worse but we really shouldn't have stayed in the first place.

I also remember a ton of Indian or Arab guys offering me drugs, and people collecting donations for some disaster in the Philippines. I have no idea if they were legit or not, but I wasn't interested in finding out. There's also all the markets with tons of knockoff merchandise, but I'm not sure I'd consider that a scam because of how open they are.

Hi Mark.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Comstar posted:

From my understanding, the Better Business Bureau is a scam itself? As in you pay money to them for a good grade.

I have worked for a company that took thier rating and any complaints seriously.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


mostlygray posted:

Yes. They sign you up and then magically the good reviews start showing up. If you're not signed up, only negative reviews show. They got sued, but Yelp won. All our positive reviews would disappear until we signed. Now they stick.

Not calling you out or anything, but have you got a link to anything about this? I am interested in tje reasoning of the ruling.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Having worked at a bank before, some small percentage of them are making money. Herbalife had people malimg money as well as Mary Kay. I think I actually remember someone who made a living out of Amway once. That was by far an annomaly though. Herbalife though i had multiple people making money from once upon a time. Where I was it seemed like it was big in the Hispanic community. Around 2006-2007.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Buying cars: total con/scam.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


When you think about it, energy drinks themselves are a scam as long as coffee, tea, and crystal meth all exist.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Most of them promise to do all the legwork for you in terms of disputing incorrect credit file info and getting fraudulent accounts closed and resolved. If they actually do that then the service is worth something because that poo poo can take hours. If they are claiming to prevent it from happening then LOL.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Cyrano4747 posted:

Man, my take away from that story wasn't "your friend was an idiot for being a bad counterfeiter" but "your friend was an idiot for passing off fake cash to drug dealers."

Yeah holy poo poo. Addicts do some really dumb poo poo when they are chasing the dragon.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


stringball posted:

Anyone who has handled even a moderate amount of cash should be instantly able to tell that a bill (probably printed on standard computer paper in this case) isn't legit just by holding it up to the light

Unless the drug dealer is as dumb as them I'm pretty sure he could spot the bill from a mile away, and he should be able to close his eyes and feel the fake one easily

Yeah anyone who handles lots of cash can tell without looking. If they crumple it up enough that you can't, you give that bill a second look. Unless the distributor is on his first day on the job, he knows what to look for because someone has already tried it and whoever he works for is probably not very tolerant of those types ofmistakes.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


In Oregon "weed dealer" can mean a store in a strip mall.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Zodijackylite posted:

I'm able to understand the appeal of most of these scams - they appeal to some urge to win now, get the better of a situation, or misrepresent what they're selling. I honestly can't figure out what urge could possibly make people buy meat from a van. I thought the instincts which prevent us from eating spoiled food would be stronger than the ice-cream-truck urge, but I guess not?

If van meat is stolen, it's not refrigerated and has probably been down someone's pants. It's a couple bucks cheaper, I guess?

If van meat is from a "legitimate" seller, then what makes it more appealing than going to a supermarket? Perhaps the only understandable answer is that not everyone has a car or easy access to a supermarket, but the logistics of that still don't make sense when you think about handing over $100 to someone with a fridge in their van.

If van meat is cheaper, which I don't think it is, could it really be that much cheaper than a store with it on sale? Is it that much cheaper than the cost of refrigeration? This isn't stolen speakers of Chinese catalog stuff, it's meat.

Could van meat have a similar appeal to moonshine, because gently caress "the man" and you want it direct? I don't think so, because this product isn't romanticized. Buying venison from the back of a hunter's truck, maybe, but boxes of industrial-packed steak from a van is more like a long-shot knockoff from a bargain store than a jar of moonshine.

Even if someone does buy meat from a van on impulse, what would motivate someone to be a repeat buyer? I can wrap my head around Amway and Mary Kay tactics, payday loans, and stolen electronics, but what kind of broken mind or depraved lunacy motivates buying meat from a van?!?!

Nice steaks are really expensive. They are trying to dupe most likely blue collar people blue collar people into thinking that these are really nice cuts that would cost a lot more if purchased retail. But they aren't. By the time you bite into that tough piece of meat they are gone.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


peanut posted:

I wish I had a tamale lady

Don't you have sweet potato dude at least?

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


I have sure as poo poo bought van fish before and will do again. People with tribal fishing rights will bring the morning's catch into town and sell of out of a cooler. You just have to know what the fish should and should not look like and you are golden. It's fresher than store bought for sure. This is probably specific to a few places in the Pacific Northwest though.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


BiggerBoat posted:

I got an email from a former client - one from my regular job and someone who I've also freelanced for - and it was just link, which I did not click, and a really odd subject line. Looks to me like someone hijacked her email and is phishing I guess.

We're gonna need a bigger bot.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Typically the financial institution picks it up as suspicious activity before the customer does these days unless someone local took the actual card and is making purchases in your hometown. Otherwise the sudden change in activity and location is usually caught and they freeze the card until they can contact you.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Proteus Jones posted:

Is the joke that you don’t know 2010 was a US Census year and that was a Census taker?

(However, it appears 2020 will rely primarily via Internet polling, so the Census taker at the door will largely be a thing of the past)

LOL 2020 results are the scam then.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


peanut posted:

Did that at least once rofl

My problem is mostly missionaries. I grew up LDS and live in Asia so my neighbors are like Nahhhhh but hey go ask the American person

This was horrible when I was stick at home with a baby in rural Akita. I was totally isolated, and then a couple Mormons came over trying to speak English to me and offering to help work whatever, but they were so creepy and desperate that I still sent them packing. My mental health was so bad that point after being snowbound with an infant for 4 months that I would have talked to any adult person in English about just about anything, but these weirdo Japanese Mormon kids were just too strange.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Mouse Dresser posted:

My bank is hyper vigilant about turning off my card for suspicious charges. Which would be great if I didn't work as a touring roadie on a theater show. I'm in a new city twice a week, which I know should raise alarm bells. Even when I speak with them and say what my job is, they turn it back on, and it happens again two loving weeks later.

At that point I would probably just use cash for most transactions.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Many stores already have the people at the customer service desk looking out for people getting scammed with Western Union money transfers. Banks certainly all do as well. Part of that probably has to do with anti money laundering legislation and part of it has to do with having a duty of care. I don't think it would be too hard to move the gift card sales to the customer service desk and have a rubric for transactions that might be someone getting scammed.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Absurd Alhazred posted:

I imagine that's part of the reason they've moved over to gift cards.

Most certainly. I would also bet that there wad an intermediate step off Visa gift cards before those became more heavily documented and policed as well. Ditto for AMEX travelers cheques. This is just one step further down the line, and it is probably high time stores started being required to pay attention to gift cards as a tool for fraud, money laundering, and terrorist financing.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


ToxicSlurpee posted:

No, he did oranges.

I'm pretty sure it was apples.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Mister Kingdom posted:

I got a call from my bank the other day questioning a potential charge. Someone was trying to use my debit card in another state at a gas station. It was a $1 hold. They blocked the transaction and canceled the card. I have to wonder if the gas station got ripped off or not?

When you do a fill up instead of a prepaid transaction at a gas station, they place a $1 hold on the card to make sure it is active. The transaction pends at $1, and then when it charges to the account it is for the full amount, similar to when you leave a tip at a restaurant. They can see if the card works and fill up at th time if the $1 transaction works.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


People also bitch when you tell them that you won't refund the fees on the transactions that happened after they gave their daughter/boyfriend/cousin/dealer their card and pin to go to the store with.

"I gave her permission to go buy groceries, not to drink $200 at a bar."

Well, you authorized her to use the card, so we don't give a drat.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


After the Equifax hack, enough information is out there to compromise almost anyone's accounts given time and determination. If they had two different partials from your credit report and a statement that together provided the whole number, that would be a start.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Ohyesitsme posted:

Probably depends on what generation you are. I'm 42 and can't think of anyone in my circle of friends who doesn't have a CC.
Older people are more "Not going into debt for anything, if I can't afford it I'll save up until I can".
I have 7 CCs, normally pay them off in full each month but will sometimes hold a balance for a couple of months (nothing huge) and just suck up paying the interest, each card in rotation - it keeps my credit score high because banks don't want to lend to people they won't make money from.

When we underwrite unsecured credit, we aren't asking ourselves if you will carry a balance. We ask ourselves if we think you will pay us back what you borrow. We are actually more likely to lend if you do not carry significant balances.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Absurd Alhazred posted:

In the US, it's difficult to get a non-secured credit card if you don't have a credit history. A secured card requires you to have a certain percentage of your credit limit available at all times. I finally got one about a year or so ago. I've looked at how this affects my finally existing credit score, and apparently one of the factors is your credit use, so if I had gotten one with twice the limit, but spent the same as I have, I would have had a higher credit score, even though I never went over the limit, and never carried a balance.

It really isn't that hard to get a card. Le and say tippy are a college student and they will basically throw plastic at you with no treatment of people credit history. Even without doing that there are still plenty of companies who are happy to give you a card with a higher rate. Your problem may be if you are trying to do business with an actual bank instead of credit card companies.

The other issue might be if you are not a US citizen or permanent resident. Many institutions will not lend without permanent status because it is more likely toy will decide to gently caress of to somewhere else without paying them.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


ChocNitty posted:

A lot of city kids are going to the suburbs to scam people with these coupon cards that supposedly give big discounts on local businesses, like unlimited two for ones. Asking $20 for these plastic cards, claiming its a school fundraiser. I overheard one reasonable person asking to see the kids student ID, and of course he gave a BS excuse.

Those cards are probably legit. They sell the same type of thing in my area and the only real problem is that you are probably not going to use it enough to make it worth it.

Ther old ladies on Nextdoor think every person selling something is trying to scam them.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


I find checks to be convenient for things like paying ther cleaning lady who comes in every other week, paying contractors who work on my home, and sending money to my daughter's school for lunches or because they are shaking me down for donations again. I also use them to pay for deductible expenses like daycare because it is a lot easier to go through a year of carbon copies of the 2-4 checks we write each month than the bank statements showing the hundred or so small debit card purchases each month. I'm sure that there might be a more efficient way to do this, but I'm used to this way and I don't find it inconvenient so why change?

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


DizzyBum posted:

Wow, what was Walmart's response to that? I feel like they're the kind of company that would just fire everyone and replace them in a week.

Some states have laws that you have to pay employees by check if they request it. This is important because a lot of the people working at places like Walmart are unbanked and some may be unbankable, so without a check they would have no way to access their pay. Pay cards are touted as a way for the employees to have access to a debit card, but they generally come with such high fees that it is not doing them any favors over a check cashing place.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Comstar posted:

Some of my relatives in Sydney this week got hit with a roofing scam. 4 guys with strong English accents (who strongly denied they were English) come up and say they see a bad roof tile and they can have a look and fix it. The go up and magically the tile is now broken and oh look here is some rotten wood we found if you let us have a look we can find all the tiles and fix them.

They then throw tiles off the roof (breaking them) and demand money to fix the broken tiles. They were very good at this and have a lot of practice, I suspect it's the same gang of guys who were doing it in NSW in 2015. They also got into the house and stole some money too. They've had a lot of practice at this and sound very very good at their job.


I have a dream that you'd get them all on the roof and then kick the ladder away, but I fear they'll get angry instead and take out their frustrations on the tiles anyway and escape before the Police can show up.

This is why you don't allow unsolicited contractors to bid work on your house.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


jobson groeth posted:

You really want to watch what blend you get though. Getting too much Arabica could put you on a watch list.

Are you saying that the feds prefer their coffee with bourbon?

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


I heard a thing on NPR once that a lot of the "Canadian Pharmacy" type emails are actually legit sites that will get you legit drugs. Like if they'r are saying thei will sell you Viagra they actually will.

Gotta get on that train for my asthma meds.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


JacquelineDempsey posted:

I don't do Facebook very much, but find it a necessary evil for promoting my art/music shows so I pop in occasionally.

Got an email that looks very legit from them saying that someone had tried to log in on my acct from an unknown device, at an hour I know for a fact I was dead asleep. It offered a link (also looks legit) to ensure the security of my account.

My question: yeah, I think this email actually came from Facebook, I'd like to think I'm pretty savvy on spotting email bullshit. But the paranoid part of me wonders: did someone actually try to randomly brute force "hack" my account, or is this FB's sneaky way of gleaning more personal info from me? They could easily send out "oh noes, you may have got hacked! Send us some more personal info like your phone number an another email, so we can scrape your info and sell it to ad companies!"

Thoughts/experiences? I'm just ignoring it for now.

I would just log onto Facebook without touching that link and they will tell you if there is something you need to do. Facebook is a scam to get all your personal information anyway though and they already have all that information.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Sanford posted:

RUBBISH SCAM ALERT

I have an allotment. The fee is £25 a year paid in advance. There are fewer than ten allotment holders total, we all know each other, share tools, take tea breaks together, etc.

When a guy with a virtually unintelligible Russian accent starts walking from plot to plot telling people the rules have changed, it is now £100 a year and it needs to be paid in cash, now, or "I will have to take this garden" it tends not to go down very well. The end result was a group of angry men carrying gardening tools telling him to gently caress off or we'll call the police. He set off on foot and as he left picked up a spade and took it with him, so we called the police anyway. They picked him up half a mile down the road and brought the spade back. Weird as hell.

If I get there tonight and the allotment has been seized by the Russian government I'm going to look a right chump.

You should have used the pitchforks.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Parallelwoody posted:

I don't understand how American banks haven't been sued into Oblivion over identity theft at this point.

In most cases you fill out some paperwork as soon as you find out and the bank eats the loss. El Bromance will likely get their money back, and the bank that cashed the check will probably be left holding the bag.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


EL BROMANCE posted:

If anyone knows a path that might lead to success I’m all ears! I can probably dig out the old paperwork and poo poo still despite how long ago it was. I’m up for a corporate fight.

I thought this was ongoing. It would have involved filing a claim for check fraud at the time that this happened. You could try complaining to the OCC though. I would say CFPB but Trump's director basically shut them down.

therobit
Aug 19, 2008


You can just say buskers. "Crappy buskers" is pretty redundant.

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therobit
Aug 19, 2008


Captain Monkey posted:

Man I'm definitely not a defender of religion, but if you can't figure out why 'the thread where we talk about telemarketers and internet scams' isn't the place to say 'ALL RELIGION IS A SCAM MAN' 7th grade atheist takes then I just don't know.

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