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MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Sharks Eat Bear posted:

kind of a variation on a classic scam, but just seemed like the weirdest twist. expensive meat deliveries seems like a relatively difficult product to base the scam around

Nah, it's not that weird, it's a classic hustle in it's own right. Some of them operate like you described. Some of them operate like the white van speaker scam: "We couldn't make the scheduled delivery and it'll unthaw before we get back to the warehouse so we're willing to let it go to you at a great price" etc.

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MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Marenghi posted:

Hasn't that been the case for the longest time. Counterfeits are usually built in the same factories as the real deal just with the production ramped up and less quality control.

You really can't generalize like that anymore. Sure, it happens sometimes, but there are a lot of factories cranking out counterfeits these days.
Hell, I've seen the counterfeit version hit the market before the authentic when the knock-off factory saw pictures of the prototype product posted on the internet, cloned it and manufactured it.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Lutha Mahtin posted:

I didn't click the link, but another scammy type of business that I don't think has been mentioned yet are those companies that advertise HOT TIPS TO BEAT THE GOVERNMENT but when you fork over your cash all you get is a cruddy pile of publicly available information. Like the scammers just write to various government agencies and make copies of the information because it's not copyrighted or is freely copyable, and charge tons of money for this SECRET INSIDER INFORMATION.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


The Sexual Shiite posted:

You get a cold call.
"We're working with your local water department to check water quality in your area. Can we come by to test it? It'll take half an hour!"
You say yes, they set up an appointment.
They come "test" your water, and throw you some bullshit about how their test shows your water is dangerous, and the chlorine in it is poison, etc. if you buy their filter, though, it'll totally fix it! By this point, they've been at your house for hours.

Here's a ten minute video on the scam. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axSkJa6IGes

Big Clive takes it to bits:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASnLL6ebaco

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Cyrano4747 posted:

If he wasn't just casing the place for a burglary he probably had some cheap router he was going to try to sell as being the fancy highest tech poo poo. Get some grandma who doesn't know gently caress all and you can talk about how their old router is giving them slower internet because it isn't comparable with the fancy glass fiber laser quantum switching unit that he, as an ISP worker, just installed down the block. This would also explain why he was put out by him knowing his exact router as that implies he isn't the kind of person who can be convinced they need more gigabytes in their thruware to prevent their packets from getting bad sectors.

Frankly, it could have been both. Sell a cheap wal mart router for 5x what it' worth and while you're at it see if the TV is worth coming back for later.

No way, that was a totally a Centurylink sales pitch; that's exactly how their door-to-door salesmen operate. Their pitch starts out with "we just upgraded to fiber in your neighborhood!" and it's as truthful as you'd expect from a door-to-door salesmen. It could mean anything from offering fiber to the home on your street, fiber to the central office or fiber buried somewhere in your state. It's the same meaningless marketing buzzword to them now as it was 10 years ago when Qwest, a telcom they purchased, was selling 20mbps "Fiber-Optic Internet"



"Just some random dude with a Centurylink ID" is how they dress. They're weird and pushy.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Lutha Mahtin posted:

...but the theoretical basis for detection still exists.

Proteus Jones posted:

Honestly outside of lab conditions and being only feet away, I fail to see how anyone can detect a passive receiver.


Apart from crystal radio sets receivers are not truly passive. Certain types of receivers leak a notorious amount of RF as they are receiving and there are ways to force them to leak more, remotely (potentially useful for detecting some types of IEDs).
It was, during wartime, used to locate spies. Outlawing ham radio during the wars made it easier to detect people using such equipment.
It's also been used by police to detect if you're using a radar detector in places where they aren't legal. Radar detector detector


I don't put much stock in the "TV Detector Vans" actually doing much detecting, but the British absolutely did have the technology and deployed it in mobile units to track down spies years ago.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Collateral Damage posted:

Don't buy merch at shows. It's always stupidly expensive and the event organizer takes 25-50% of the profits. Buy it from the band's own store, it's going to be cheaper and the band gets a larger part of the profit.

Lol, you like music popular enough to have "event organizers" instead of some dude named Chris thats praying he can get some band that lives out of their van to show up on a week day.

Hot Tip: dudes living out of their 12 passenger rental van selling merch at shows are turning your merch purchases into gas money, meals and hotel room stays.

I've missed out on a whole shitload of "tour-only" releases by not having the cash on hand to pick up a bunch of 7"s.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Reminded of the first, and only, time I had the "jab a cd into your hand and demand money scam."

I was a teenaer, high as gently caress, just leaving the Family Values Tour and some jackass jammed a rap cd in my hand. I had no idea it wasn't legit. I think I just dropped it on the ground when he demanded money.

Some dude had just shoved a Digital Hardcore sampler at me.

The Digital Hardcore sampler was legit. It's still one of the my favorite things I've gotten for free:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ncm9J8KXU50

It had as MSRP of $2 at music shops. They were literally shoving them at people like they were prostitute cards after a show.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Collateral Damage posted:

Of course if it's a tiny bar show where the band themselves are selling the merch off the edge of the stage after the set, that's a different question. Those guys are probably not going to have a merch store anyway.

Speaking of selling things just off the edge of the stage....
ATR getting arrested at an anti-fascist riot:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nb-wgQ9DsMw

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rXhAnu5ETU

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


ChocNitty posted:

A lot of city kids are going to the suburbs to scam people with these coupon cards that supposedly give big discounts on local businesses, like unlimited two for ones. Asking $20 for these plastic cards, claiming its a school fundraiser. I overheard one reasonable person asking to see the kids student ID, and of course he gave a BS excuse.

You've never hear of fundraisers selling coupon books before?

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


bamhand posted:

I keep getting calls about medical grade braces. Is that such a large demographic that it's worth robo calling over?

Yup, "every person on Medicare" is a large demographic. I watch the weird over-the-air networks you've never heard of: braces make up a pretty good chunk of the commercials. It's the ol' "they're free! We'll bill Medicare (several thousand dollars) for you!" poo poo.

It's straight up Medicare fraud. Once enough of the brace sellers get busted they'll move on to some other product to scam money out of Medicare with.

https://www.mcall.com/news/watchdog/mc-nws-medicare-back-brace-scam-watchdog-20170904-story.htm


It's similar to the old electric wheelchair scam but the scammers don't need to get a doctor (or fake being doctors themselves) to say you need a knee or back brace like they did with the wheelchairs. Ever wonder why you don't see Hoveround commercials anymore? The government started busting people for fraud and Medicare updated the price they'd pay so the fraudsters wouldn't make $4000 in profit on every sale.

https://amac.us/medicare-scam-just-kept-rolling/

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


ToxicSlurpee posted:

It's one of those situations where they aren't technically lying as there are a few people making a crap ton of money off of it. What they never tell you is that that's a very small handful of people at the top in the inner circle and I'll let you in on a secret; you aren't getting in. Ever. I forget the numbers but the amount of people actually making any decent money off of MLM is somewhere in the single digit percentages toward the low end; like 1% or some poo poo. People making six figures doing it is in the fraction of a percent.

You are way, waaaaaaay too generous in your estimation. People making four figures, gross, is typically in the single digit percents or lower. You don't even get above the poverty line as a 1%'er in a MLM.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


BiggerBoat posted:

2 young looking kids (maybe 18-20 years old) showed up at my door the other day claiming to be from ATT and apologized for "not looking like it" and told me they were informing people of some "services they were upgrading" or some such poo poo. I could have pressed it and asked "why don't I believe you? What department of ATT?".

But...what's the scam? Do people hand non uniformed random teenagers cash for telecom service?

Phone companies absolutely do send scammy looking people around like that. They don't bother with stuff like uniforms or anything because the job turnover is too high for an expense like that. It could have been scammers or employees (but I repeat myself); they're basically indistinguishable.

In my area they'll send people around like that saying "$phone company is upgrading to fiber in your neighborhood!" and try to get you to switch to DSL. By "neighborhood" they generally mean "maybe somewhere in your metro, but definitely not to your house."

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


CleverHans posted:

Roulette: European wheels have a single zero on them, standard US ones typically have 2 zeros: I have been seeing ones that have *3* zeros on them with, of course, the same payouts as the single and double zero wheels. You do the math on that.

The house edge is 2.7%, 5.26%, and 7.69%

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Jeb Bush 2012 posted:

unless your address is so weird that you can't imagine anyone having that address plus a number or whatever, I'd say the most likely answer is that someone typo'd their own address as yours

Or they just don't understand you don't get to own an email address just because you want it. Pretty common with FirstnameLastname@gmail/hotmail/outlook I hear.

I've seen people track down the phone numbers of the folks signing up for stuff with the wrong address like that. It often ends with a verbal argument when the owner can't get it through the idiot's brain that this isn't your email address, and never will be, no matter how many times you try and claim it is.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


ToxicSlurpee posted:

For better or for worse sometimes somebody needs to borrow money.

A bank I've used since childhood is a rural co-op. Farming in this country would basically collapse entirely if farmers weren't able to borrow against future earnings (and/or government payouts). It's a sad fact of life that if they can't get loans every year to put the crops in the ground, they'll have to sell the farm to one of the international conglomerates. Trump has royally hosed these people over, despite most of them voting for him. There are people in /r/legaladvice asking what to do as they lose their farms because they trusted the Trump administration to pay out what they promised, and then reneged on.

The co-op I've been a member of since I was a child is quite successful with their farming loans and has bought up quite a few of the other co-ops in it's area (pre-trump). I expects some hits as the local branches are closed as time goes on.


Sydin posted:

the mail I'm getting for her seems to be winding down to 1-2 things a week. Highlight was about a week ago when I got at least six small package envelopes, all from China, which apparently contained hair clips according to their labels.

I know some kind of scam is at least being attempted here, but I have no idea what it is.

Chinese companies will literally send random compromised accounts a bunch of junk so they can inflate their "verified reviews" on places like Amazon. You can google it as "amazon brushing scam" or just "brushing scam".

quote:

"Here's how the scam works: A seller has something listed on the website, then a fake account created by them or someone close to them buys the item and sends it somewhere random. That account can then leave a glowing "verified review," which is worth a lot to sellers. "

https://www.forbes.com/sites/wadesh...t/#4f85977573da

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Midjack posted:

Where’s the scam here again?

The scam is that people believe this propaganda:

luxury handset posted:

e: florida distributes some (could be more, imo) money to local and college education in the form of grants and scholarships

http://www.flalottery.com/site/education

States that use lottery proceeds to fund education often take as much, or more, of the lottery money out of the education budget and spend it elsewhere.


"We actually were better off, in operating dollars, before the lottery," said Charlotte County District Spokesperson Mike Riley.

"The lottery money isn't enhancement money," Riley said. "It's replacement money, and not as much money is being replaced."

https://www.nbc-2.com/story/38107458/how-much-money-goes-to-schools-from-the-florida-lottery-jackpot

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Yawgmoth posted:

You argue that temp agencies aren't an MLM but then you say this, which absolutely sounds like some MLM bullshit.

Protecting sales lists sounds absolutely nothing at all like an MLM and I have no idea how you could even begin to make that stretch.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Tubgoat posted:

The "flu" "vaccine" is a scam. Vaccinations are not a scam, they are the foundation of reaching adulthood alive and uncrippled. But the flu "vaccine" is bullshit. It's never the correct one.

YIKES

If the people that choose the few flu variants to vaccinate against each year are wrong, it's not a scam. They just predicted wrong. It happens every year. They don't have a loving time machine, you know?

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


BiggerBoat posted:

No one under the age of 40 will know what that means.

Records were actually about to overtake cd sales for the first time since '86. They're really quite popular as a physical medium. You've been out of the loop a lot longer than you think. LP sales have loving skyrocketed over the last 10 to 15 years.

(One big downside is that the kids don't know the plural of vinyl is vinyl. They call records "vinyls.")



One of the two places left that can supply a required piece of the record pressing supply chain burned down in February. Things are not looking good right now. https://www.billboard.com/amp/articles/business/8550477/vinyl-record-industry-apollo-masters-plant-fire

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


TheParadigm posted:

That's not actually a bad idea.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dtlw_h-3e7k I saw this a while ago, and the idea is pretty interesting. Mini kitchens in the same area just for to-go food stuffs.

I think there's good potential for businesses to split delivery staff the same way.

'd actually sort of love to be able to order of like 2-3 different menus and get it in one package because it all came from the same place.

Virtual, or "ghost," restaurants aren't new. These sort of places already exist but they mostly fly under the radar. Door Dash has had it's own shared kitchen in the bay area for a while now: Chick-fil-A has been renting space there for about a year now.

Some restaurants even operate their own virtual restaurant out of their kitchen. Chuck E Cheese calls itself Pasqually's Pizza on delivery apps. It's not the same pizza they sell in the restaurant. It's Just Wings is Chili's. https://www.businessinsider.com/virtual-brands-owned-by-chain-restaurants-pasquallys-just-wings-2020-8

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Bioshuffle posted:

What's the deal with those door to door electric provider services? It's got to be done kind of scam, right?

Ya know about MVNO, the Mobile Virtual Network Operators? The folks that sell substandard access to AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon or Sprint? Kinda like that, but for power. Like the "Boost Mobile" of electricity. They resell something you can get directly. The electric middlemen will almost certainly cost you more, despite what the salesperson at your door says.

Nobody that goes door-to-door promising to save you money is good for you. Not paving/asphalt, not fiber, not shingles, not trees, not power. You get screwed 100% of the time.

Power and fiber "scammer's" are often locals in my area that hire temps that don't even understand they're working a scam. Some of the biggest DSL companies enjoy these people.

The asphalt and tree scammers are summer seasonal professional scammers. They migrate up from the south (don't poo poo where you eat) when it warms up here in the north and station their wives and children to beg in suburban neighborhoods while the men work their scams. Never ever ever ever ever agree to let somebody "refinish your driveway" or "trim/cut down" your trees if they knocked on your door. They'll promise still sorts of things, take your money, and disappear into the ether.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Also, be vary vary wary of anybody trying to convince you to put solar on your roof under contract. People get absolutely hosed when they go to sell the house and the problem is going to keep getting worse as more people keep signing up for these "deals."

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


nonathlon posted:


Sure would like a way of buying a car where the price is just the price and I don't have to run the gauntlet of weak excuses, added charges, weird extended negotiations and excuses ...

That's what Costco Auto purports to do. If a dealership tries to play dealership games while selling through the program, narc then out to Costco.

Some goons have bought cars through the program. Stop in to the Costco thread in GBS and ask about it.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Volmarias posted:

My favorite is "real estate investor seeks trainee, serious inquiries only" which... I'm not sure who you plan to rope in with that.

An absolute poo poo-ton of people. Like MLMs, the real money in that scam comes from selling classes and conferences. It's pretty funny seeing some 21 year old take out an hour log pre-roll ad on YouTube to try and convince people to buy whatever real estate scam training he's offering.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Mister Kingdom posted:

I've gotten several emails from "Google" letting me know "your photo has been chosen". That's all it says and there's a link to "Google".

I don't use Google to store photos, so there's that.

Google does actually send out updates to tell you how many people have viewed your photos if you take pictures at businesses. You'd think the scam mails would at least attempt to emulate the legit mails, but they don't.

Also half my spam is in cyrillic these days for some drat reason.

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MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Midjack posted:

That was a thing with really old electromechanical switches, the call didn't terminate until the originator hung up. I'd be amazed if anything installed in the last 50 years was vulnerable but if the author lives in an old part of town in London that prides itself on old stuff or something similar I could see it happening.

It worked the opposite when I was a kid. People used to prank call us and we'd set the handset next to the stereo and tie up the phone line for hours.

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