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Soylent Yellow
Nov 5, 2010

yospos


Greed is always a good way to scam people, especially if the scammer mixes in just enough of a veneer of false authenticity. My workplace has a small Argos (large UK retailer) concession tacked on. A few weeks ago, there was a spate of people coming in to various stores demanding a free iphone 6. It turns out that the scammers had circulated a fake news article on social media claiming that Argos had 1000 iphones which they couldn't sell due to damaged packaging, and were giving them away rather than return them to Apple at a loss. All you had to do was go to a website, enter your personal and bank details, then go to your local Argos to collect your free iphone. The story and supporting evidence were just plausible enough for greed to bypass common sense, and hundreds of people turned up. Some still insisted that they were entitled to a free iphone even after being told their credit card details were probably in the hands of the Russian mafia.

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Soylent Yellow
Nov 5, 2010

yospos


British scammers seem to have finally discovered photoshop. We've had a recent rush of people attempting pricematch scams. They'll come in with a picture of a receipt for a high value item on their smartphone, with the value of the item edited to about 20% of RRP from one of our competitors. They will then demand that we sell that item to them under our pricematch policy. We will usually tell them to go gently caress themselves, but occasionally they can browbeat an unaware cashier into reducing the item, especially if all of the supervisors are busy elsewhere.

Soylent Yellow
Nov 5, 2010

yospos


ExcessBLarg! posted:

Last week I was going through airport security when a middle-aged woman stopped the guy behind me in the X-ray line with some story that her daughter was going off to college for the first time and she forgot her carry-on and she's just on the other side of security and, could you take this suitcase through and give it to her? Honestly I didn't stick around long enough to find out what happened.

I don't know if it was a scam or not. Probably not, it's a strange enough circumstance that it's a plausible story, although frankly I'm not sure how she got past the TSA boarding-pass check to begin hassling people in the X-ray line. Either way, if she had asked me I would've turned her down--I'm not taking responsibility for whatever crap is in that bag. I know that for international travel they actively warn you about not accepting luggage from others, but this was a relatively-small domestic terminal.

The package probably contained several kitchen knives and a copy of the Koran. The woman's hobby is probably getting innocent strangers arrested on terrorism offences and added to the no-fly list.

Soylent Yellow
Nov 5, 2010

yospos


We had an email from one of our suppliers last week warning of a scam. A number of companies had recently received emails saying something along the lines of "Hi, this is company x. We've just changed our bank details, so please can you send payments to this bank account from now on"

They're a pretty big company, an the majority of small businesses in our industry use them. The methodology probably involved simply googling "company type" and emailing the first couple of hundred hits.

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