Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



My current favorite scam appears several times a day on r/legaladvice. Somebody on chatroulette/omegle/some other thing sends a dick pic to some "girl" and then gets a message from "her father" saying that "she's" 14 and he's going to call the police if dick pic guy doesn't send $400 via MoneyPak/GreenDot/some other anonymous cash sending thing.

It always seems to be $400 for some reason.

Edited to add: this is a glorious (and ambitious! $4700!) example.

AlbieQuirky fucked around with this message at 08:37 on Feb 24, 2016

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Earwicker posted:

No, you don't need an overseas call center, and it's trivial to get the contact info for people who could potentially be in debt by going through the garbage at an apartment complex.

Most people in the US are in debt, so you could just call everybody.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



RenegadeStyle1 posted:

I have no doubt that panhandling could net you good money sometimes but it's kind of ridiculous to think they are going home to $300000 homes. How would you even buy a home? You're not making enough to buy one with cash and you technically have no income in order to get a mortgage.

Eh, maybe she inherited it from her parents. There are millions if not hundreds of millions of beggars in the world, so it stands to reason that some percentage of them are crooks.

Some percentage of everybody are crooks.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Multi-level marketing was catching on big in China, but the government has been cracking down.

It's also huge in South Africa.

AlbieQuirky fucked around with this message at 23:47 on Apr 13, 2016

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Jeb Bush 2012 posted:

I wouldn't recommend using herbal remedies for anything, let alone cancer, but you shouldn't believe anything you read in the daily mail unless you've seen it confirmed by a reputable source.

Would the Medical Journal of Australia be reputable enough for you? Quoted here ; the article itself is behind a paywall.

Here's a non-paywalled piece from Archives of Dermatology.

AlbieQuirky fucked around with this message at 22:50 on Jun 29, 2016

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



The Lone Badger posted:

If you're going to scam someone, why would you choose literally melting chunks of them off instead of sugar pills or coloured water or something? Seems like it would be a harder sell.

The tingle means it's working!

I think the people who sell and promote that poo poo really believe in it, because it was a common treatment in the 19th century and earlier. Of course people treated syphilis with mercury and kept people with cholera from drinking water back then, too, but hey.

There's a really good book called Marketplace of the Marvelous that discusses why so much quackery was so popular in the 19th century (spoiler: actual medicine was pretty crap, and sometimes doing nothing or even doing basic things like giving people water to drink was better than the mainstream treatments available) and why it's still popular today (Dunning-Kruger effect, magical thinking, poor understanding of science, statistics, and risk analysis).

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



kaschei posted:

Last I heard mercury treatment actually worked and side effects were usually less severe than neurosyphilis, but less effective or safe than modern treatments.

This article is the most pro-mercury one I have found, and it's not a ringing endorsement (tl;dr: it may have helped resolve lesions in some patients and could have curtailed further infection if administered early enough).

I suppose a better example of completely counterproductive treatments of the era would have been using calomel (mercury plus opiates) to cure colitis.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Gas station people get paid whatever their wage is, so no need to tip unless they have to go out of their way to help you. It's not like people waiting tables in the states where they get paid $2.50 an hour because it's assumed they'll get tips.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



There's a great book called God Wants You to Roll about scammers that preyed entirely on churches.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



BBB is exactly like Yelp for old people, up to and including the point where "member" businesses get negative reviews removed, or their impact mitigated. So it's worth it for a business to take negative reviews seriously, but an absence of negative reviews may not mean the company is great.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



PJOmega posted:

It's amazing how a business that extorts millions of other businesses has done so without a single scrap of proof.

Proof of what? I'm a little confused. Do you think BBB or Yelp should investigate each consumer report they receive?

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



It seems pretty well documented that Yelp advertising sales staff tell businesses that if they advertise, Yelp will push positive reviews to the top of the page. I guess that's somewhat different from what BBB does, so.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



I think we're mostly on the same page that neither BBB nor Yelp is to be taken without a grain of salt. I will accept your argument that BBB games their system more than Yelp does as correct, since you have more knowledge of this than I do. I definitely find Yelp more helpful!

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



peanut posted:

lmao he should look into ancient astronaut consultant positions with the history channel...

Needs 300% more hair. The hair is what makes Tsoukalos a star.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Loot crates.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



I am going to post triumphantly to this thread when I get my $1.56.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Anybody who manages to make even a bit of money in an MLM is likely brilliant at sales, and thus should quit the MLM and find a legit commission sales job and make real money.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



We paid $3,000 for our 2000 Honda Civic hatchy in 2009, and it's still our daily driver (including an 11,000 mile drive around the US in August 2016). We do have an amazing mechanic, though.

Bought it from a Subaru dealer that had taken it as a trade-in on a new Outback.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



BiggerBoat posted:

Are things like Lifelock and ID protection services generally scams?

Not necessarily intentional scams, but ineffective and a waste of money. You can monitor your credit for free.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



therobit posted:

Most of them promise to do all the legwork for you in terms of disputing incorrect credit file info and getting fraudulent accounts closed and resolved. If they actually do that then the service is worth something because that poo poo can take hours. If they are claiming to prevent it from happening then LOL.

Resolution services (or restoration services, as they're sometimes called) might be worth the money. The actual identity theft protection services are pretty much useless (I saw an ad for Experian identity theft prevention on the TV and lol).

Anyway, here's one site's roundup and recommendations on different services.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



MightyJoe36 posted:

I remember a year or two ago there was a "Native American" loan company advertising on TV for a short time. Their pitch was basically if you couldn't get a loan anywhere else, you should call them. (The reason I put "Native American" in quotes is that I am unaware of any Reservations here in Ohio). I wonder if it was this guy.

Probably the Allegany Reservation in Western New York State, that's not all that far from Cleveland.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Sir_Lagsalot posted:

Unless you know the email address is one they use, it's more likely spammers harvested the info from social media and set up the account to match. I get emails from time to time with the name of friends/relatives trying to get me to open links, but it's never from the actual address they use. The subject is always something vague like "I thought you might appreciate this".

I get that every other day or so, mostly "from" the same three friends who are on Facebook a lot.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



I think what you have there is what human behaviorists call "a belligerent rear end in a top hat."

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



JacquelineDempsey posted:

Friend of mine just got a text msg saying his Amazon is sending out a package, and he hasn't ordered anything in months. The phone number they list is only 6 digits. What up with this?

Could be a scam from the person texting, could be a scam from an Amazon reseller (this podcast describes how some Amazon resellers are astroturfing reviews by sending stuff to actual Amazon customers).

Either way, your friend should change his Amazon account password asap.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



greazeball posted:

What kind of job can still be competently done by a 100-year-old? Academia? I've got lots of teaching colleagues who are noticeably losing a step in their 70s.

Stamp dealer or coin dealer

They all seem to be at least 100

Roger Angell still writes great stuff for the New Yorker and he's 97.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



The Big Short

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



ToxicSlurpee posted:

I still can't help but wonder who ever is buying cheap steaks of questionable origin from a predator van. It must work on somebody as it keeps coming up but really.

A friend's father buys them. Also cryptocurrency. Also a hydrolyzer for his car.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Absurd Alhazred posted:

I think you should be required to get some kind of license before you deposit a check, people clearly do not understand who is obliged to do what in that scenario.

In the tiny bank my father used, they had signs about this up at the teller counter.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



It has literally never happened to me, but also I am super neurotic and ask everyone I know for recommendations to their trusted, non-ripoff shop and will go there no matter how inconvenient. Our current dude is amazing but if he ever retires, everyone I know will get another round of grilling.

I definitely hear stories both in person and on line about auto shops ripping people off and/or being incompetent. So far my out of control neurosis has helped me avoid this.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



This is one of the ways itís cheaper to have money, I guess? When you have money, you have your car serviced regularly by the person youíve had recommended to you as honest and not a ripoff, so you have a track record of that person being reliable. When youíre broke, you might not have the cash to stick to the service schedule, so you donít necessarily have a track record with the same shop

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



My dentist always shows me the cavity on the X-ray

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Electric resellers also a thing in Massachusetts and New York.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



BiggerBoat posted:

Buncha scam podcasts The AV Club linked:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/body-tape-intl/lie-cheat-steal

Figured I'd toss them in here

Awesome, those topics look great. Thanks!

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



peanut posted:

That's really weird, both JW and LDS missionaries always travel in pairs.

Iíve seen single men (older) on the subway station detail, but never a single woman.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Sanford posted:

RUBBISH SCAM ALERT

I have an allotment. The fee is £25 a year paid in advance. There are fewer than ten allotment holders total, we all know each other, share tools, take tea breaks together, etc.

When a guy with a virtually unintelligible Russian accent starts walking from plot to plot telling people the rules have changed, it is now £100 a year and it needs to be paid in cash, now, or "I will have to take this garden" it tends not to go down very well. The end result was a group of angry men carrying gardening tools telling him to gently caress off or we'll call the police. He set off on foot and as he left picked up a spade and took it with him, so we called the police anyway. They picked him up half a mile down the road and brought the spade back. Weird as hell.

If I get there tonight and the allotment has been seized by the Russian government I'm going to look a right chump.

I think thatís more of a protection racket than a scam, exactly. The tool theft was certainly an original touch!

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



tinytort posted:

Last I checked, they don't even have payment terminals that can be brought to the table at restaurants. You expect them to have tap-and-go or chip and pin when they don't even have the ability to keep their credit cards in sight when paying at a restaurant?

That exists here in Boston, but maybe only 10% of the restaurants I go to use it.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



The Reddit r/antimlm sub has a pretty comprehensive list of what the average participant earnings are for each MLM (compiled from the annual releases that are required in the US by I think the FTC?)

It is pretty sad.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Inspector 34 posted:

I don't think Kinko's exists anymore...

Bought up by FedEx, name changed to FedEx Office.

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Undertaking only really became a profession in the US during the Civil War, with the rise of embalming and patent coffins as a way of preserving dead servicemembersí bodies for transportation.

Before that, corpses were washed and prepared at home, coffins were built by local cabinet makers (in cities) and carpenters (in rural communities), and burial was arranged by cemetery staff.

So itís always been (in the US) about commercializing something that had been handled informally by family and community.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

AlbieQuirky
Oct 9, 2012



Midjack posted:

Whereís the scam here again?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply