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Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



I'm on mobile so can't find it right now, but wired did an excellent piece on the famous stuxnet worm that wrecked havoc on these kind of closed, extremely carefully guarded control systems (in this case nuclear reactors). Worth a read!

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Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



unknown posted:

Fun scam I've heard of recently.

Person rents a place using AirBnB for a couple of days, posts rental a listing for occupancy in a month or so and does a viewing/open house.

People multiple go, love the place - gives a deposit to the "landlord" (generally last month's rent) who cashes the checks and runs (takes from multiple future "tenants").

4 weeks later when they come to move in, loads of people are there and there's a pissed off building owner dealing with screaming people.

Yeah this one I know, a friend who was in great need of a place to live fell for it in Amsterdam. Awful really, they could handle a month's rent or deposit or whatever but it's such a nasty way to be taken advantage of. The timing of moving in can be stretched over the course of a week or so, they never met any other victims. Preying on the desperate is a great way to scam someone, as that group will take a little more risk usually, but they're also the one least equipped to deal with it financially (usually).

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



HerStuddMuffin posted:

He couldn't resist. :ssh:
:rip: Comstar, killed by an exploding phone. Or a drone strike, it's not quite clear.

Or the Ozzie robocaller, they're quite ferocious.

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



I couldn't really sympathize with earlier posts about cold calls for sales/scams/pyramid schemes until people mentioned getting them multiple times per day :aaa: Yeah, then it makes sense to stop answering all calls because wtf

Still think it's weird how regional the phenomenon is though, my phone has a SIM of my own and one from the office. The office one gets filled out to a lot of companies, a lot of people have it and it rotated between several different people before I got it but I get actual Phone Calls so rarely that I usually don't even recognize the ring tone the first few seconds (everyone IMs/VoIPs through various services). I figured maybe do-not-call registries worked really well because of ~~EU regulations~~ or something but the UK has them as well? The lovely TrueCaller dialer that came preinstalled on my android phone is starting to make sense now

Old Binsby fucked around with this message at 23:21 on Jun 28, 2017

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



You joke but a lot of dummies try this. If you're going to be a con man, pick literally any target besides insurance companies. They've been there, done that and got so many t-shirts they could blot out the sun with them. Sure, people succeed at this too but a lot try it once too many times. If you trip up, well... prepare to bend over paying back whatever you owe and start your new game+ hard mode life without any (affordable) insurance

Sadly it's usually people in pretty dire straits already that get hosed exponentially trying this

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



This guy at least had a watch. It's been a while since I've hung out with anyone in that business so maybe it wasn't well known then to people how easy it is to find the source of an internet image. Anyway I've heard more than one of these cases end with the fraud people simply reverse google image searching . Usually to find nothing but once in a while they end up at some enthousiast forums account two continents away, posted the day before they requested it, lol

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



They record it and cut/paste the yes into a consent bit for something it's hard to back out of because they have real lovely customer service, website and hide/don't use any registered physical addresses
I literally heard this from my grandma so it might as well be a several thousand year old urban legend thing that never happens

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



the reason I hesitate to believe my grandma is it just makes no sense, if they're doctoring the recordings anyway why even bother using your voice. If you take them to court or whatever they'll get you off their backs and find another sucker. Also is saying yes over the phone a legal way to enter into a binding contract? If it's a robocall, that's definitely weird, but otherwise as well. How do you identify who is dealing with whom? what if I pick up at my friends' house or I get a number that recently changed owners?

Probably best to find the snopes page about it at this point.

e. that was real easy, apparently this thing got a little bit of media attention earlier this year. The story is much older than that though, I'm sure. Doesn't say it's definitely an urban legend though but it just sounds perfect for a PLEASE SEND IT ALONG!!!! chain e-mail/facebook post

http://www.snopes.com/can-you-hear-me-scam/

Old Binsby fucked around with this message at 22:54 on Jul 7, 2017

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



Yeah apps that want a load of permissions without any reason should be avoided.

If you boot up the inlaws' desktop pc I'm optimistic there's going to a Bonzi Buddy in there somewhere. Really appreciate my tech savvy dad more whenever I read things like that, I'd have no idea where to even start instilling digital common sense into people who don't have any.

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



Common courtesy is pretty weird. A good con man can use it that to put you on the wrong foot, so you instinctively make wrong decisions that he can exploit

but a couple bucks for a breakfast is just not worth getting into trouble over probably. Botching a dine and dash may or may not be something you can explain away depending on how smooth you are. But deliberately putting a room number other than your own down on the bill that's quite hard to weasel out of and probably not something people take to very kindly. Also, that the hotel might lose what you owe for breakfast sucks for them and you, but probably a bit more troublesome is attempting to put that charge on some random room number, since your attempt at simply stealing food now involves a third party you're also defrauding.

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



Accenture is fairly big multinational consultancy firm, it's not unusual for referral bonuses to be pretty lucrative in that sector because a lot of companies are trying to recruit from the relatively small group of what they define as 'high potentials'. I'd guess that's the most likely explanation

Or your friend is just really enthusiastic, but Accentures reputation isn't that it's a super fun place to work (unless you're into that kind of thing, in which case you'd probably know them)

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



Maybe your grandma shouldn't be driving. Your family - kinda reaching here - might just be freaked out the woman they knew is old now and not as sharp as she used to be? Hope they come around on the blame thing. Probably worth looking into whether that key forgetfulness/scam gullibility isn't an early sign of Alzheimer's, lovely as that might sound

And maybe get her a book if she likes them so bad

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



Cancel in writing, have them sign for receipt? Turn in all your poo poo, play by their rules

Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



Eh it depends, not a lot of people can keep up that stuff long term but my brother has done it for ages going door to door. He knows it's scummy given his bonuses but it's a nice side job if you enjoy sales and want to git gud at it. He did and he's pretty happy for the experience now

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Old Binsby
Jun 27, 2014



Panfilo posted:

I gotta wonder what the scams are gonna be like when Millennials are retirement age.

Probably stuff like "Boomer prosperity was in fact buried in the form of Gold boullion in land plots in XYZ location! Buy a plot and recover what your parents unjustly stole from you all these years!"

Basically Fallout was an attempt to simulate exactly this

I fear the day I'm old and daft enough to fall for the stupid scams my grandma would get ripped off by if she were online. She was smart and with it just like younguns now

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