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Quote-Unquote
Oct 21, 2002



Josef K. Sourdust posted:

Thanks for those replies. So what is the economic incentive to pay for posters? I know most of the sovcit stuff is scam/paranoia/libertarian/magical thinking so what's the payoff for putting up enigmatic posters?

You're trying to rationalise the actions of completely insane people dude.

The funniest part of those stupid LEGAL NAME FRAUD billboards is that they don't even have a web address or any sort of way to find out more about it. Even googling the words on it just takes you to various news outlets pointing out that it's a load of stupid nonsense.

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Oct 21, 2002



Imaduck posted:

It's a little more complicated than that. There are definitely people trying to profit from the sovcit stuff by selling informational materials, as described in the article from the Canadian judge someone linked earlier. Some people are naive and desperate and get duped. Others have always been anti-government, and this jives with their worldview as a way to stick it to the man. And yeah, some folks are just mentally ill.

There's a great Planet Money Podcast on it that has elements of all of these things.

Oh yeah I don't doubt that dude.

I mean the people putting up the billboards that have absolutely no information about what it is or where to learn more, and are surprisingly difficult to find further information about by searching (in that the first few pages of results tend to be news articles talking about how stupid these billboards are), are probably not trying to profit off of sovcit crap. If they are, they're even dumber than I thought (which I thought was impossible, but I'm ready to believe).

Your general lolbertarian/sovcit scammer at least provides you with some way to buy their kool aid.

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Oct 21, 2002



PT6A posted:

I've been getting a lot of "FedEx" emails saying that my parcel could not be delivered and would I please open this ZIP that has all the shipping details?

Who the gently caress falls for that poo poo?

My old boss, back when I was in IT

He was actually expecting a parcel from FedEx and opened the attachment, which turned out to be some ransomware demanding payment from his credit card in order to decrypt his files.

He was actually about to put his drat credit card number in when a colleague told me what was going on, so I ran over and stopped him and reminded him that all of his stuff was on network storage and was fine, and it'd take me maybe 10 minutes to reimage his machine and then he could carry on with his day instead of instantly falling victim to fraud.

Quote-Unquote
Oct 21, 2002



RE: TV licensing in the UK

You only need to have a licence if you want to watch broadcast TV or the BBC's catch up service (Iplayer). You don't need one to own a TV. So, if you don't watch TV (or Iplayer) you need to fill out a little form on the website and they leave you alone forever. Or at least until you move, because the whole TV detector van thing is bullshit; they have a list of properties in the UK, and they have a list of addresses that have TV licences. Then there's a list of people that filled out the form on the website. Doesn't take a genius to figure out which ones you need to send letters to, and if they ignore those letters then send someone round. There are at least three letters that tell you to go to the website or use the pre-paid envelope and provided form to apply for exemption.

Basically people whining about being harassed over the TV licence are either too loving lazy to fill out a very short form, or they have a financial interest in getting rid of the BBC, so they come up with all sorts of elaborate conspiracy theories about why the BBC are evil and out to send old ladies to prison or whatever.

Trouble is, a lot of the UK is dumb enough to fall for this poo poo.

edit: this isn't to say that you should let Capita's goons into your house. Absolutely don't do that. It's hosed up that the TV licensing thing resorts to that, but seriously: spend like five minutes filling out the form and they won't bother you. It's been like fifteen years and four different addresses and I've never once had a letter, let alone a visit, because I fill out the drat form when I move in.

Quote-Unquote fucked around with this message at 22:30 on Sep 18, 2017

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Oct 21, 2002



EL BROMANCE posted:

Back in the UK, I got a call from my bank one day for security

“Did you then fly to Italy and clear out your account?”
“Errrr nope”

Haha, I had this happen once. I'd bought something using my credit card from a supermarket on my way to work, then two hours later got a call from my bank asking if I was in Calais buying a tonne of stuff from one of those big 'hypermarkets'. Theoretically, there would've been just barely enough time for me to hop on a plane at the nearest airport and get to Calais (and the hypermarkets are pretty close to the airport), but it still flagged up as suspicious. Charges were cancelled and I got a new card in the post the next day, which was great customer service.

Still not positive how my card details got stolen, but I suspect it was this (now long-defunct) German alternative clothing store. I'd let my housemate's girlfriend borrow my card to buy something since neither of them had credit cards.

Quote-Unquote
Oct 21, 2002



ilmucche posted:

I don't think I've seen a credit card in the UK or France either. Admittly I don't really look at people's cards, but debit seems more common for locals here.

About 60% of adults in the UK have at least one credit card. US is about 75%.

Personally I use a credit card for absolutely everything, because I pay it off every month and get rewards for using it, plus I can cancel charges if I need to (only happened once).

I think people are daft using debit cards when you get free stuff for using a credit card.

It's not like twenty years ago where you had to manually keep track of your spending lest you get a massive bill you can't afford - every single bank and credit card provider has online portals/apps that let you check your balance at any time so it's really, really easy to make sure you're not spending more on the card than you have in your account (assuming you have access to the internet in some form, and even then every bank/card provider has a phone number you can call to check your balance)

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Oct 21, 2002



teh winnar! posted:

That's because you use a credit card for convenience. Unfortunately, a lot of people use a credit card for credit (to pay for things they can't afford), leading to spiraling debt.

I know. I'd be the first person to advise not to use a credit card for actual credit unless you are really desperate. I'm talking about people that have cash, but use a debit card instead of a credit card. I can't figure out why you'd voluntarily give up the protection offered by a credit card.

In the UK at least, every high street bank offers credit cards to anyone that hasn't got completely ruined credit. The interest rates are terrible and you don't get any rewards, but you still get the protection of being able to cancel charges. To me this is an invaluable thing. If you can get a reward card that's even better, of course, but even a basic lovely credit card is better than a debit card.

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Oct 21, 2002



shame on an IGA posted:

Yeah the magical thing about working in Facilities Maintenance has been realizing that a clipboard and tool bag is a golden ticket to go anywhere the gently caress you want

This happened at the 2012 London Olympics. The whole thing was such a monumental omnishambles and security was pretty much non-existent, since the company that was hired to provide it (G4S) completely failed to provide enough people. Like, it was maybe a third of what they had promised. The government ended up bussing in random unemployed people and forcing them to work security for a pittance, then ditching them under a bridge to sleep at night. Meanwhile, various pranksters were getting pretty much anywhere they wanted to go simply by putting on a high-vis jacket and looking busy.

G4S continue to get incredibly high-value government contracts, despite having scammed the government on multiple occasions - including the time they charged hundreds of millions of pounds for ankle monitors for people that were already in prison or dead. They later repaid a few million.

Of course, almost everyone in the government just happens to have shares in G4S, or in a company that has stock in them. It's so transparently corrupt that it's kind of hilarious, or at least it would be if there weren't people starving to death because their welfare has been cut in order to keep paying into this blatant scam.

Quote-Unquote
Oct 21, 2002



I've just received an email from Spotify telling me that I need to reset my password because there has been 'suspicious activity' on my account.

I don't have a password for Spotify because I use Facebook OAuth for it.

The email looks completely legit, the headers in the email look correct, and the Reset Password link appears to direct to spotify.com (I haven't clicked it). I'm 99.9% sure it's not a phishing attempt but I can't figure out why they ever would have sent this email.

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Oct 21, 2002



Sanford posted:

I got the Spotify email and when I went to log in to Spotify it said you need to change your password, so it seemed fairly legit.

Yeah like I said it all seemed legit, just weird since I use OAuth and not a normal Spotify login

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Quote-Unquote
Oct 21, 2002



Tubgoat posted:

I, uh, can't really believe that more than one person has tried this, but apparently it's a common enough scam for homeless people to pretend to be private investigators/bounty hunters in order to get into a hotel.

Thankfully, they left after I informed them that, without a badge or license to operate in the jurisdiction, they're not apprehending suspects, they're committing kidnapping and false imprisonment. :v:

My office used to be right next to the (usually unmanned) reception area in a local hotel chain's head office and I had people claiming to be PIs wandering in looking for information.

Thankfully, data protection legislation means that whether they are legitimately a PI or not they will be told to get the gently caress out because there's no way I was going to tell anyone if someone was staying at one of our hotels unless they're a police officer with a warrant.

I also heard stories about how they are/have been hired by a family member who is worried about this person's wellbeing, and that's harder to resist giving up info until you realise that abusers have used this exact tactic to find their victims. I'd kick that up the chain anyway, but I'm pretty sure it was always a case of "come back with a police officer and a report of a missing person" because serious data protection breaches in the EU can hurt rather a lot.

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