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Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Pekinduck posted:

Thread moved on a while ago, but this is all you need to know about the Better Business Bureau:

https://www.bbb.org/us/mi/ada/profile/multilevel-sales/amway-0372-17004933

yikes

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Agh, just got scammed again with the old "it's just basically salt" scam! Classic

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

I don't bank with CITI. Nonetheless, they just mailed me two things: A brand new credit card I "applied" for, and a letter stating that my application for a credit card was rejected because they couldn't verify my identity.

Well poo poo. I seem to be having some identity theft.

To make matters worse, there's all these other things going on in my life that now I have to wonder if they're connected to identity theft attempts. Could they be?

1. Our apartment complex has someone on videotape periodically stealing everyone's mail.
2. I never got my driver's license in the mail from the DMV. My wife never got hers years ago either, so either the DMV is horrible about sending them out, or it got stolen too (the mail theft was happening back then as well).

And the worst one:

3. I just had my entire month's paycheck stolen. I called my work's payroll to ask when it was coming, and they replied that someone had already endorsed it so their bank can't reissue it. I never got a check this month, much less put my signature on one or deposited it. They sent me a fraud application to fill out and told me it could take many, many months for the pay to come through.

Could these be isolated scammers who happened to hit me at once because they're so common, or is it likely one scammer that has all my info and is trying to do everything?

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

EL BROMANCE posted:

Most companies do direct deposit, I work for a smaller place and we still print checks. But because it's not 1990 at least through technology you don't have to go to the bank anymore - you just take a photo in your banking app and deposit it that way.

I *did* sign up for direct deposit immediately upon hire, but they just kept mailing me paper checks anyway. My work's new payroll system is so bad that it sparked major protests. The website looks like somebody's first coding project.

And no, I can't deposit a printed check by taking a photo because my bank won't take app deposits that are over a certain amount (~$2000).

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Last week there was also a sign in attempt into payroll to change my details, and when I called them they had a weird phone number on file for me, but they *insisted* that it was a routine e-mail that gets spuriously sent out and that they were just a 401k service so there was nothing to steal. Should I be worried about that?

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Question, what should I do in immediate response to lock down my identity if I'm getting obvious signs that people are trying to take credit out in my name?

I believe I qualified for an identity monitoring service from UCLA health as part of a settlement after they leaked my data, and sure enough I get e-mails every week from Transunion about credit monitoring, but now I'm even suspicious of those and I can't see where they ever gave me a real login or welcome email. Is https://www.creditviewdashboard.com/CreditView/login.page?enterprise=TU1 a legit website? Can I trust them to lock down my identity?

They just sent me an alert about my credit but I can't even read it without a login.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

greazeball posted:

Step 1 get a fuckin PO Box dude

We got this instead:

EL BROMANCE posted:

If you're not getting things in the mail, definitely sign up for this - https://informeddelivery.usps.com/box/pages/intro/start.action

It's amazing how much better my mail receiving has been since I used it, coincidence perhaps? It does strike me as ironic that it took me 2 attempts to sign on, because the first thing they mailed me didn't bloody arrive.

Hopefully in time to catch if my license ever came in.

What else?

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Helpful fact 1:
ANYONE can place a hold on your mail. The USPS will ask for some credentials if you show up at a branch, but NOT if you use the website. It lets any address be input, and they can even put in bullshit for the other info (phone number and name) and the hold request still works.

Helpful fact 2:
If anyone puts a fraudulent hold on your mail, there is no way to know! AND, once you find out that it happened, they have no way of pulling up a history of how many times it has happened for your address in case you're wondering why you kept missing mail this year. They can only search by the other two fields (name and phone number) which will be fake every time as mentioned.

So this happened to me. I only found out because for some reason my mailman dropped off my accumulated mail in my box anyway, in a big roll, instead of pickup like the fraudulent mail hold wanted.

Total damage so far this week:

- $2975 -- My paycheck for one month stolen, forged signature
- $2145 -- 1 Best Buy CITI card granted to the spammers in my name, and they racked up that much already
- More that I don't know about yet
- MANY other cards applied for and rejected, but my credit got dinged

I keep finding out about more as I manage to get ahold of my mail and see the bills, rejected applications, and actual cards mailed.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

zmcnulty posted:

There has to be more to the story. Surely with just someone's name and address you can't sign up for a credit card, can you? Why did the Best Buy application go through but the others didn't? If Best Buy lets people make credit cards using anyone's name and address, it seems any bills racked up as a result of their lovely KYC process should be their problem, and not yours.

That's kind of what my bank told me yesterday -- that Best Buy / CITI is notoriously terrible about approving cards in anyone's name. Said they make money either way, whether it works or whether they make insurance eat the cost.

However, I assume that everything that's being done to me requires quite a bit of my info, and that they've got it. They seem to have physically intercepted my paycheck in the mail and have been placing holds to try to get MORE mail, and have been doing this to me at this address for god knows how long while I was out of town all year, so they might have even intercepted stuff like IDs that we just thought never came.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

If you want to see a neat video of a dude busting through our complex's front door to steal from unsecured storage lockers (including keys to the building and poo poo), check this out

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/3tjfvdug7zwupy1/AABwKjS6_RDC5BbmVnKZIU14a?dl=0



That was this weekend. Maybe it's him that stole my identity and money, but maybe not. We've had a dude on camera going through our complex's mail with a master keyring for a LOT longer than since this guy showed up. Years.

Happy Thread fucked around with this message at 03:34 on Jul 31, 2019

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

It's due to incompetence

Dumb Lowtax posted:

I *did* sign up for direct deposit immediately upon hire, but they just kept mailing me paper checks anyway. My work's new payroll system is so bad that it sparked major protests. The website looks like somebody's first coding project.

And maybe a side of some of the paychecks being stolen by insiders, opportunistic about our disastrous new payroll system, who want to keep them paper for that reason.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Jeb Bush 2012 posted:

Hold mail on the website requires a credit card with that address, doesn't it? Maybe they had already gotten a credit card in your name, though.

Just visited the post office and I think you're right. I had just read a misleading or wrong article:

https://www.cnet.com/news/postal-service-site-lets-anyone-hold-your-mail/

quote:

In the old days (and you can still do this), you went to the office and filled out a form (PDF). Someone on the show who has done this said the Postal Service doesn't validate the identity of the person who requests mail to be held. It validates only the identity of the person who comes to pick up the mail.

Government techies copied this manual system to the Internet.

You can go to https://holdmail.usps.com (or click on Hold Mail at the Postal Service home page, as shown below) and put a hold on mail delivery. Notice that I didn't say put a hold on your mail delivery. You can put a hold on mail delivered to anyone. This is true with the traditional system, too, but the Internet makes it worse, adding more anonymity and making the process easier. Too easy.

The agency site claims that it needs a name, address, and phone number to stop mail delivery. When tested, however, this turns out not to be the case. Requests with wrong names and wrong phone numbers were accepted, according to a listener who wrote in to the show. All you really need to know is an address.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

If I go to https://www.annualcreditreport.com/ that always uses up my opportunity to view my credit for this year, right?

Since I'm in the middle of identity theft and I should check my credit several times this year to follow up on the fraud, I don't know what I should use to not get locked out after the first time.

For example, Transunion had a special checkbox for victims of identity theft, as a special circumstance for viewing the report. I believe that let me view my Transunion credit report without using up my "one per year".

How do I find a similar option on Experian? Equifax? They do not make this easy at all and really want to sell me one instead.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Yeah I get email from "TRANSUNION INTERACTIVE / TransUnion Consumer Interactive, Inc. / Creditview Dashboard" ever since 2016, which unexplainably picked up to monthly monitoring this year, about my credit. It correctly issued warnings to me this month during the identity theft. Maybe I got free monitoring from some settlement however long ago and don't remember, who knows. But Transunion denies knowledge of them and I have no idea if they are legit or how to log in, or if logging in to view my alert is a trap.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Just Googled my own name, and right after the first page the top result is a site with my personal cell number as the title, hosted on usphonebook.com. Not sure how they got it, guess I've had this phone number for too long.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

hellotoothpaste posted:

Edit: More protips. Appchoices and Adchoices, while I'm not trustworthy of an advertising association, seemingly erased most knowledge that the networks have on me at least when it comes to serving me ads. One click auto submit of 'forget me' requests to hundreds of ad networks whose names you won't even recognize.

None of my ads are relevant anymore, which makes me think it isn't scammy but I haven't looked into either enough to be able to guarantee that. All I know is that all internet ads per device, and even my streaming service video ads seem to have guessed that I am part of a hispanic family that enjoys high fashion, which is about as inaccurate as it gets.

Hahaha they want me to install their software on my device just so I can opt out of their data collection that they shouldn't have been doing? Where is this "one click auto submit" option? All I see are requirements to install their app to make it happen.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Except for the ones at the bottom of this.... pointed three-dimensional shape?

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

She probably had no recruits and OP was probably the first potential mark she tried talking to

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Responding to recruiters and their cold calls/postings over LinkedIn actually works out sometimes. For engineering jobs anyway, according to recent stories in the programming interviews thread.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

EL BROMANCE posted:

Randi is great but still don’t love the fact he appeared in Epstein’s black book.

Gah gently caress, I was just about to sing his praises and say I hope he's not in that and then was worried that I'd jinx it

This scandal better not get Richard Wolff

I already grew up on Stephen Pinker and had to find that out yesterday

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Back to scams:

Last year my wife got a letter in the mail from "Fletcher Unclaimed Asset Recovery" that says they have discovered unclaimed assets being held by the New York Office of the State Comptroller. "We would like to assist you in recovering these funds".

Details of your unclaimed asset: Owner name (my wife), year (2017), owner address (some place in new york she didn't live in 2017), reported by synchrony bank, amounts due for undelivered goods/services.

Uh, scam right? How does this one work?

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Ah, great link, I was able to search their site for my wife's name. 150 different addresses popped up in the results because I think that many people in NY share a name with her. An easy target then!

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

luxury handset posted:

your state may suck for some reason but lotteries often do pay for supplemental education on the state level beyond local control of school funding

Wasn't there some post recently about how states were freely able to take from this fund, diverting lottery money from education to wherever they need it at the time? It was either lottery or property tax or both where someone was pointing out that the money often does not ultimately end up where it was designated for

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Tunicate posted:

Don't be like that, dude. I even went to the additional trouble of posting excerpts from those articles for people who don't have journal access.

Just spotted a scam right here in this thread! Observe how this poster has quoted the words of another poster. I, doing due diligence, took it upon myself to scroll up and double check. But upon arriving at the same post being quoted, found it to be altered, truncating the word "anyway" to "a"! Your scam almost fooled me, but clearly with no integrity to stand on you lose the argument about lotteries

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Just got a call from Tanya Perkins from the "student loan help center" saying that due to recent changes in the federal student loans forgiveness program, my loans might now qualify for forgiveness provided by the US Dept. of Education. If I want to see if I'm eligible to reduce or eliminate payments I have to call this number, blah blah blah. Scam targeting recent graduates who are way over their heads in debt and feeling anxiety over it

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Lotta gamblers posting ITT

You all do sound different from everyone else

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Solution seems pretty standard for vice, tax the poo poo out of it and fund awareness campaigns and addiction help

Not going to happen anytime soon under capitalism though

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Nah, it's super weird to be a casual casino gambling fan in here, it always sounds weird, and it's weird as hell looking in from the outside.

It's always gonna be weird seeing a subset of people insist that the (objectively depressing) innards of a casino full of sad old ladies in the act of losing their life savings is actually a fun innocent place to be, if only approached with self-imposed limits that you're definitely disciplined enough for, unlike those other people.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

bamhand posted:

Same but bars and alcohol.

Don't forget strip clubs. The atmosphere is depression central in those.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

BiggerBoat posted:

None of those posit that "people can't get addicted to gambling" which was what you asserted.

He said act, not posit

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

You mean to tell me that they didn't come up with a way to rig the purely mechanical slot machines too? Some weight or friction or something physical added to create an advantage?

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Here's a new scam. Organized crime in LA is somehow shuttling people's mail around to different mailboxes that they have physical access to. (Update -- that's not quite what was happening; see my next posts).

I can see how it makes money. They stole a whole month's pay from me.

Crazy story of it:

I was away from my main address last year due to construction, and didn't check my mail often. Every few months I would pick up what mail had accumulated, and would often be missing things like my new driver's license from the DMV that never came, or my wife's, but wouldn't think much of it. Just blamed the DMV.

I did have one suspicious incident where I found a big packet of someone else's mail in my box, with a "mail hold" notice. I wondered if my mailbox was being used to steal other people's mail, but chalked it up to the mailman's mistake. Wrong.

When I finally moved back home, I noticed I wasn't getting any expected mail. One day I finally did it but it was in a big packet folded up with an official USPS "mail hold". The problem was, I never put my mail on hold.

So who the hell did?

----

I called the postal inspector. Turns out thieves had been using mail holds to steal my mail for a while. The inspector said that my mail had been put on hold twice just this month, using a forged e-mail and phone number. The thieves would have needed a credit card in my name -- no problem for them, I could tell they were opening up credit cards as me, because those new cards had all arrived inside the big mail packet that I got. I should say, that I got, but wasn't supposed to --- due to a postal worker's mistake the hold got ignored and all the mail went to my box anyway, otherwise I would have never found out.

I worked with the local post office to make sure it stopped happening, and then started the long process of cleaning up my credit report and accounts.

That's when I noticed something funny. When they opened one of the credit cards in my name, they didn't list my address, but somebody else's across town.

I first looked up the address on Google to make sure it was another victim who lived there, and not the criminals! Google quickly came up with several residents, past and current, the current ones being two young women rooming together who seemed, on further Googling, to be trying to start small businesses or doing journalism. Nothing threatening.

----

I drove to the suspicious address and checked it out. It was some apartment complex in Hollywood. They had the exact same mailbox design as us, and I knew its vulnerabilities well. Our own complex's security footage showed three burglars coming in last year who had bootleg keys to open our whole row of mailboxes; this was the same type of mailbox. We had our mailbox lock changed, and I noticed the keyhole went from being gold colored to silver, but this Hollywood apartment still had the same gold keyhole that the thieves could open.

I slipped a note under their door that said contact me, I'm a victim of mail/identity theft and I think you might be too. After a while, I got a call from one of the residents saying yes, she had her rent check stolen from where she they them (her landlord had them hang them on their front doors ), and the thieves tried to charge their own rent charge to my bank account. She plans to file a police report together with mine, since we have the same thief.

Then she asked me, "Did you leave TWO notes under our door? The other one from a month ago was you right?"

"Uh......... no, what is that?"

She had found another letter "from me" left under her door a month prior, forged in my name. It said:

"Hi, I'm (my own real name). I live in unit #5 and I just moved in to this building, you might receive some of my mail! I made a typo with change of address. Please leave my mail outside the mailbox and I'll pick it up!"

Sure enough, she and her roommate dutifully left piles of my junk mail on the mailbox for the thieves. The timing of the fake letter coincided exactly with when I got the post office to start cracking down and stop doing mail holds. The thieves somehow had one last trick up their sleeve, to reroute someone's mail to another mailbox they control.

I just got off the phone with the postal inspector again and they have no idea how the thieves did it. There's no record of a mail forward on file for me. Just a heads up that this can happen, and that ID theft groups can become VERY dedicated once they intercept your state ID in the mail.

---

Some observations:

- Presumably what they were after by stealing my mail for just a little bit longer was another monthly paycheck they could cash. They already managed to steal my paycheck for the entire month of June, so that's proven pretty lucrative for them. How can you cash a check that's not made out to you, you ask? Easy -- they already stole my state ID, so they can just show up at any bank branch and claim to be me opening a new account, deposit the check as me, and then immediately cash it out.

- The bootleg mail keys were hand-made by thieves, apparently. They're capable of buzzing a mailman (or a thief) into the front door of a complex, and then the same key opens all the mailboxes. When I mentioned our security footage to my postal worker, he told me that he and his coworkers have found bootleg keys along their route -- stuck in the front door buzzer of buildings, because they weren't made quite right. Once they got stuck the thieves had to just leave them there to be discovered by postal workers.

- In hindsight, it was a big red flag when that big packet of someone else's mail that showed up in my box with a hold notice. My neglected mailbox was being used as a base to steal other people's mail, all around the neighborhood. If you ever see that happen in your mailbox, that's what's happening.

Happy Thread fucked around with this message at 16:38 on Sep 21, 2019

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Sydin posted:

Some woman changed her address to mine a few weeks ago and also signed up for some sort of USPS package tracking thing where she could see packages come to the house. Canceled this (USPS actually sent me card asking if it was me with instructions on how to cancel it) and have been marking all the mail arriving in her name with change of address stickers on them with "NOT AT THIS ADDRESS" and sending them back. Been watching my credit like a hawk have a camera watching my front porch, nothing out of the ordinary on either front. My mail is also delivered via a slot that empties into my locked garage, so it can't be flat out stolen (and I have a camera watching that too just in case). If it's an attempt at a scam, it appears to be a really poor attempt.

If there's mail theft it's probably not about your mail, it's about hers. She might not have been the one who did the address change. It could have been filled out for her by thieves and there is practically no way to find out if it's happened. Like I said, I only ever found out because a postal worker made a mistake.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Midjack posted:

Yeah, the mail hold/forward thing has been known and possible for a while now but recently got some traction on the internet and had been proliferating ever since. Good detective work by you and as I’m sure you’re discovering the Postal Inspectors do not gently caress around.

Today I figured out what really happened with this. No, the thieves in my case do not have a way of "tricking" the post office into redirecting mail without it showing up as anything. When the post office said I never had a mail forward, it was accurate.

What I was observing was that I am getting some of my mail, and the other victim was also getting lots of mail in my name at her address (and a forged note claiming to be me instructing her to leave out my mail). I wasn't sure what could explain me getting some of my mail, and her getting some of it.

Now I see that I am actually getting 100% of my legitimate mail. Therefore what she is getting is 100% stuff that the thieves signed up for, that I don't know about. Not merely my unwanted junk mail after all, sadly, but things like new credit applications.

When thieves start any new account or services in my name they can just put down her address, and then whatever company will just believe them, and mail all the stuff her way such that I never find out it exists. That's how it works apparently, no post office trickery necessary. Makes a lot more sense this way.

The timeline of my case seems to be this, then:

1. Thieves notice I'm away because my mailbox is piling up
2. They steal my ID from my mail, and use it open up lines of credit, and to cash my paychecks (mailed because my employer ignored my direct deposit signup)
3. They notice that I'm back and the mailbox is no longer under their control
4. Then continuously sign up for mail holds as me to try to keep intercepting more mail, hoping to get more paychecks they can cash
5. Around the same time, they stop listing my real address down for new lines of credit they open as me, because they no longer control the mailbox. Instead they list down another address with a similarly keyed mailbox they can break into.
6. Other person gets tons of phony credit applications in my name, and a phony letter saying not to worry and just leave it on the mailbox.

Guess it's time to run all my credit bureau checks AGAIN because there's god knows how much new stuff they signed up for this way, in all the piles of mail that person says she got.

I guess the packet of someone else's mail I found in my box with a "mail hold ended" notice last year really may have just been a postal worker's mistake after all, and not some trick the thieves have of re-routing held mail to wrong addresses. Just a coincidence.

Happy Thread fucked around with this message at 19:28 on Sep 19, 2019

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

I did a one year freeze (edit: whoops, meant fraud alert) -- but I'm going to also apply for a seven year one, which according to Equifax has to be done in writing and I think requires documentation proving you need it.

I got one last piece of mail the other day from Bloomingdales Department Store National Bank. It said they were denying a new line of credit. But this time it was because of my recent credit freeze, whereas my previous letter from them said it was because they couldn't verify my identity. So the thieves already knew that Bloomingdales was a no-go, but they applied again for their card anyway -- because they knew Bloomingdales would happily snitch out anyone's credit freeze status by sending a different letter if there is one. Thanks for gathering that info on me Bloomingdales, I have never shopped in one of your stores in my life.

Happy Thread fucked around with this message at 16:37 on Sep 21, 2019

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Ah yes, I meant 1 year credit alert, not credit freeze. Mixed up the words.

I did both and the freezes were indeed a separate process from the alert, and are permanent. With the freezes I had to call each credit bureau individually do to each one, although their automated phone systems handled it all.

For the 1 year fraud alert, it only takes one call to any of them and they have to notify the others via a government agency. That was easy too. But, for a 7 year alert you need a reason and you have to mail it in writing.

For each of these events they mailed me something to acknowledge that it happened. For the fraud alert it came from the government agency they had to notify.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

Another common scam: Organ donation. You signed up for it on your license intending to do a good deed. But see below. The companies that rip them out make deals with the state coroner that let them do so at the expense of interfering with your autopsy. If you ever become one of the folks who get murdered by police/criminals, then organ harvesting corporations might well be the reason why your death is never properly investigated as a murder and pushed under a rug. Better still, your organs might go towards installing borderline luxury products into rich baby boomers instead of saving lives. To rescind your organ donor status you need to do another whole DMV visit and risk getting another ID made (and perhaps intercepted for identity theft, the subject of my last huge post).


comedyblissoption posted:

the article says the body harvesting companies are literally writing laws coercing coroner's offices to let them get first digs

comedyblissoption posted:

In the rush to harvest body parts, death investigations have been upended

quote:

The case is one of dozens of death investigations across the country, including more than two dozen in Los Angeles and San Diego counties, that The Times found were complicated or upended when transplantable body parts were taken before a coroner’s autopsy was performed.

In multiple cases, coroners have had to guess at the cause of death. Wrongful-death and medical malpractice lawsuits have been thwarted by early tissue harvesting. A death after a fight with police remains unsettled. The procurement process caused changes to bodies that medical examiners mistook as injuries or abuse. In at least one case, a murder charge was dropped.
...
To raise those numbers, California and other states over the last decade passed laws requiring coroners and medical examiners to “cooperate” with the companies to “maximize” the number of organs and tissues taken for transplant. Procurement companies’ lobbyists helped to write the legislation and push it into law.

In a handful of states the laws go even further, giving the companies the power to force coroners to delay autopsies until they have harvested the body parts.

Although the companies have emphasized organ transplants, in far more cases nationwide they harvested skin, bone, fat, ligaments and other tissues that are generally not used for life-threatening conditions. Those body parts fuel a booming industrial biotech market in which a half-teaspoon of ground-up human skin is priced at $434. That product is one of those used in cosmetic surgery to plump lips and posteriors, fill cellulite dimples and enhance penises. A single body can supply raw materials for products that sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars.
...
The county’s contract with OneLegacy does contain restrictions. Procurements from victims of suspected child abuse and officer-involved homicides must be approved by a senior morgue official.

Another notable contract exception: Donation is “generally unsuitable” in cases of media interest, including celebrity deaths.
..
In 2007, the year the laws passed in California and many other states, the procurement companies obtained just 2% of donors of bone, skin or other tissues through referrals by coroners and medical examiners, according to a survey by the American Assn. of Tissue Banks. Now, some companies report that a majority of their donors come from those being wheeled into the county morgue.

Mone, the CEO of OneLegacy, which operates in seven Southern California counties, said about 63% of organ donors and 51% of tissue donors came from the company’s partnerships with morgues in 2017.

“The law,” he said, “has been very beneficial.”
...
To increase the supply of harvested body parts, the companies have embedded procurement teams inside government morgues across the country.

Morgue officials at times give the corporate employees key cards so they can enter at any hour. The companies rent rooms inside the morgues, including suites where surgical teams harvest donors’ tissues.

In a growing number of counties nationwide, the companies can log into government computer files on the newly deceased, allowing them to swiftly find potential candidates for procurement.

In Michigan, a company called Gift of Life said donations of bone and other tissues soared after its foundation gave some coroner offices iPads loaded with special software to record details of a death at the scene, which are transmitted instantly to the company.

For several decades, federal rules have required hospitals to alert procurement companies when anyone dies inside their walls. With the new connections to government morgue computers, the companies also know immediately about deaths outside hospitals — and have contacted families when the body of a loved one is still at the scene, according to written complaints made to supervisors by morgue staff in Los Angeles and Tacoma, Wash.

“I was inside the residence performing my investigation and the family was standing by outside,” Kim Pavek, an L.A. County coroner investigator, wrote in an internal complaint about OneLegacy after a suicide in 2008. “The decedent’s mother asked me why someone from my office would call her cellphone during such a distraught time.... She explained to me that someone from OneLegacy said they were a representative from the coroner’s office inquiring about ‘donating parts.’ ”
...
Despite the limited review, The Times found more than two dozen cases in which the procurements made it harder to determine the cause of death. In many of those cases, coroners were unable to conclude either why or how the person died.

The cases included possible homicides, highway accidents, deaths after surgeries, a drug overdose, a suspected suicide and a death that followed a fight with a police officer. The deceased ranged from homeless people to members of wealthy families, although more were poor than rich. Most were middle-age or younger. One was a child.

In at least five cases, the documents show that companies harvested body parts without reporting what appeared to be a death from a crime, an accident or suicide to coroner officials. California law requires any person in charge of a body who has knowledge that the death may have been from unnatural causes to immediately alert the coroner.

comedyblissoption posted:

*cinematic logistics montage of child dead from opioid overdose, grieving family agreeing to organ donation because at least it will save some other child, body harvesters throwing away the useless internal organs b/c they were liquefied from kidney failure and prolonged life support, ripped off skin being grounded up, middlemen haggling over price and profit margins and then hand-shaking, then finally skin paste being injected into the now fatter rear end of a sackler family socialite*

Happy Thread fucked around with this message at 19:35 on Oct 13, 2019

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

rujasu posted:

Yeah, this - telling people to rescind organ donor status seems like harmful advice to me, can we not do that?

I wasn't suggesting to, I was just preemptively suggesting how. Personally I do not want my own death investigation to be compromised for profits. But, requesting a new ID is a risk too so I might not.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

The Pirate Captain posted:

I mean, if you hate the rich so much that you think denying them their butt injections is worth people dying over, then sure, that can be your ideology.

Most days I feel like it is that, honestly

Tubgoat posted:

Except it's not the donor deciding, it's the wealthy, and they will let the needy die for their comfort/appearance in every single iteration.

Who makes the decision of where and to whom your organs go? It's not all automatic right? Is jumping line in the waiting lists a thing like I've heard it is?

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Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005

by Fluffdaddy


Plaster Town Cop

zmcnulty posted:

That hasn't been the definition of a bank since as long as banks have been around. They've been giving out loans with your money since like 3000 years ago. Before cash, electricity, capitalism, pyramids in Egypt, and baby Jesus. I mean banks do bad poo poo, yes, but if you're going to whine about it you could at least spend 30 seconds learning why they exist.

Wow this was really bitchy and missed the point

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