Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«146 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Fragrag
Aug 3, 2007
The Worst Admin Ever bashes You in the head with his banhammer. It is smashed into the body, an unrecognizable mass! You have been struck down.

It's starting to get warmer and we have a kitchen window that lets a lot of the sun in but where we can't hang up a standard curtain installation because of a hoodvent.

We were thinking of putting up some hooks and hang a curtain up for the really hot days.

The wall above the window is masonry or concrete which will be difficult for my simple Ikea drill and I really don't want to buy new stuff just for this. So I was wondering if there are any good adhesive hooks that will work well on a textured wall and support at most 3kg spread over several hooks.



Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Fragrag posted:

So I was wondering if there are any good adhesive hooks that will work well on a textured wall and support at most 3kg spread over several hooks.

None that I've ever found, especially in an area with lots of heat, which it will be on a sunny day.

Hubis
May 18, 2003

Boy, I wish we had one of those doomsday machines...

Home Spergin':


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xb6TIWub6KU

Sirotan
Oct 17, 2006

Sirotan is a seal.



Ham Wrangler

Fragrag posted:

It's starting to get warmer and we have a kitchen window that lets a lot of the sun in but where we can't hang up a standard curtain installation because of a hoodvent.

We were thinking of putting up some hooks and hang a curtain up for the really hot days.

The wall above the window is masonry or concrete which will be difficult for my simple Ikea drill and I really don't want to buy new stuff just for this. So I was wondering if there are any good adhesive hooks that will work well on a textured wall and support at most 3kg spread over several hooks.





Buy a shade instead and mount it to the frame above the window?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Sirotan posted:

Buy a shade instead and mount it to the frame above the window?



Or external shutters.

The Dave
Sep 9, 2003



How often do you open those windows? Looks like the have hinges and swing in? Normally I would say roman shade or a compression rod curtain but not sure how much is going to interfere with the opening.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Jaded Burnout posted:

I'm over here dealing with trades with paper invoice books and cash in hand, lucky if they have an email address and know how to use it. A website for any kind of trade is effectively marketing, so if they're already busy enough from word of mouth and facebook then it's not unusual to not bother with the time and expense. I don't have a website for my website development company and it's been in business for 7 years. Do whatever due diligence you can to make sure they're properly incorporated and insured (and that the people you're talking to are actually that company) and it's probably fine.

This is an interesting one because I see a lot of stories on here from people in the US aghast that their bathroom tiles are adhered straight onto board, and I keep quiet because that's how I've always seen it done (and how it is in my new bathroom). Presumably there's some good reason y'all use more than e.g. the moisture-resistant plasterboard that I've got here, but to me, any kind of membraning would be above and beyond.

That said, I have encountered tradies who do things a specific way, and it's what they're used to and what they prefer, and they don't always adapt to change for newer techniques. Whether this is a problem or not depends on how much of a difference you think it'll make, but if you go with that crew it sounds like you'll get a good job of a worse tech or a bad job of a better tech.

Thanks for the response/reassurance! Yeah, I figured that for a lot of small contractors, websites/etc. might not be something they're too worried about. Per thumbtack they seemed to have done a lot of jobs for custom home builders and also remodels in posh areas like Scottsdale, and so I'd have thought that if they did a bad job, word of mouth would have possibly shut them down quick.

As long as they do the proper install for the liquid membrane I think I'm less concerned about it being used, but yeah, just a matter of getting a good tech like you said.

Slugworth posted:

Membrane isn't nearly as ubiquitous as you would get the impression from these boards, at least in the Chicago area. I've demo'd a looot of bathrooms (including new construction) and never actually seen a membrane in the wild. Concrete board is definitely the standard here though. Could be a difference in building materials, but even our version of moisture resistant plaster board (greenboard) eventually starts getting soggy and falling apart behind shower tile.

I wonder if they're using the membrane-treated cement board? It looks like per the partial demo so far, that Redgard was used in some areas, and the mold we encountered behind the tile was only really at the areas where tile was placed directly on dry wall, and the cement board areas seem to be ok.

It actually seemed like the areas that got mold were partly due to gaps in grout and such.

socketwrencher
Apr 10, 2012

Be still and know.

SourKraut posted:

So my wife has had some health issues in the last year since we moved into our house, and it's probably unrelated or not the cause, but we recently decided to replace our framed shower with a frameless because the framed shower had been tiled up in a way that trapped water and had mold that we were constantly fighting.

A handyman we know tore out the shower and tile pieces we'd need to replace, and we find out that they didn't water proof/tile the shower properly, and often simply grouted the tile to drywall in places and not even cement board.

We've been trying to get quotes to gut the existing walk-in shower tile and replace with new tile, but now that Arizona has Reopened, it's been hard to get quotes since everyone rushes to sell/buy houses again. I ended up putting in a request through Floor & Decor's Installation Made Easy website last week, a person came out this week to give the quote.

Maybe this is a bit odd to ask, but is it wrong that I"m a little concerned that the contractor doesn't even have a website? They're on thumbtack and Facebook, but I couldn't even find them on Yelp, and it seems like these days everyone at least has some type of website or such. The company is licensed/bonded/insured per the state ROC site, but only been in business three years.

The other part is that after reading here and elsewhere, I had somewhat convinced myself that something like Ditra or Kerdi would be the way to go for waterproofing, but their quote is for a liquid membrane system, and they told me that not all of their staff is trained on it, and it could be a lot more expensive since they said the entire system has to be Schluter to get the warranty.

I was all set to do the initial downpayment for the work, but now I'm second guessing myself.

I'd be wary of contractors pulled from such a website and would ask for references and pics. If/when they start making excuses about not having them, I'd look for someone else. I'm guessing you've already asked friends, family, co-workers etc if they've used (not just heard of) someone they'd recommend. If NextDoor is active in your area, I'd ask there- it's a surprisingly good resource in my area, especially when multiple people have good reviews of contractors who live in the same neighborhood.

Liquid membranes being a lot more expensive doesn't make sense to me, and I've never seen a Schluter liquid membrane. Might ask why they're pushing a liquid membrane given what they said about staffing and the cost- surely they must be claiming it's clearly superior to Kerdi otherwise why would it be worth it (there are advantages, but it shouldn't factor significantly into the cost).

Don't rush it. A great tile job will be a joy for decades, and a mediocre one will bug you from day one.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

socketwrencher posted:

I'd be wary of contractors pulled from such a website and would ask for references and pics. If/when they start making excuses about not having them, I'd look for someone else. I'm guessing you've already asked friends, family, co-workers etc if they've used (not just heard of) someone they'd recommend. If NextDoor is active in your area, I'd ask there- it's a surprisingly good resource in my area, especially when multiple people have good reviews of contractors who live in the same neighborhood.

Liquid membranes being a lot more expensive doesn't make sense to me, and I've never seen a Schluter liquid membrane. Might ask why they're pushing a liquid membrane given what they said about staffing and the cost- surely they must be claiming it's clearly superior to Kerdi otherwise why would it be worth it (there are advantages, but it shouldn't factor significantly into the cost).

Don't rush it. A great tile job will be a joy for decades, and a mediocre one will bug you from day one.

Sorry, I think i misstated what they said about the liquid membrane. They said that Schluter was the more expensive system. They acknowledge the liquid membrane is cheaper and they use Mapei AquaDefense. He told me they donít like RedGard because it takes longer to cure and sometimes they find, per them, that it hasnít properly cured enough when tiled over. They also have a few staff that are certified on Schluter but not everyone has been.

socketwrencher
Apr 10, 2012

Be still and know.

SourKraut posted:

As long as they do the proper install for the liquid membrane I think I'm less concerned about it being used, but yeah, just a matter of getting a good tech like you said.

This is the part that I wouldn't want to gamble on. It's too much money. A tile job isn't a 12-person operation. I'd want a tile contractor with long experience on site doing the work with helpers, not whoever's available on staff, especially a staff that''s not fully trained on various methods which implies inexperience in the trade in general.

socketwrencher
Apr 10, 2012

Be still and know.

SourKraut posted:

Sorry, I think i misstated what they said about the liquid membrane. They said that Schluter was the more expensive system. They acknowledge the liquid membrane is cheaper and they use Mapei AquaDefense. He told me they donít like RedGard because it takes longer to cure and sometimes they find, per them, that it hasnít properly cured enough when tiled over. They also have a few staff that are certified on Schluter but not everyone has been.

Oh my bad, that was my misinterpretation.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

FUCK AROUND AND FIND OUT


good news, after re-sanding the area below and to the left of the clock, I reapplied the spray jizz and it's somewhat of an improvement. The texture is still not as fine as the wall though. I did what it said, with all the shaking and then putting it under warm water before spraying but oh well. The area I need to go to next is on the upper wall where it looks whitish.

edit: I'm noticing it's still not nearly fine enough. I guess now I need to soak it in warm water for 15-20 minutes first lol. I hate this poo poo, gently caress these stupid textured walls

Only registered members can see post attachments!

actionjackson fucked around with this message at 18:48 on May 21, 2020

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Textured walls gain character over time as you patch them. You can tell funny stories about them or leave them as mysteries for future generations.

Sirotan
Oct 17, 2006

Sirotan is a seal.



Ham Wrangler

actionjackson posted:

good news, after re-sanding the area below and to the left of the clock, I reapplied the spray jizz and it's somewhat of an improvement. The texture is still not as fine as the wall though. I did what it said, with all the shaking and then putting it under warm water before spraying but oh well. The area I need to go to next is on the upper wall where it looks whitish.

edit: I'm noticing it's still not nearly fine enough. I guess now I need to soak it in warm water for 15-20 minutes first lol. I hate this poo poo, gently caress these stupid textured walls



I would practice on some cardboard if you can. For my walls I found I needed to shake the can really well, put it in warm water for 1-2min, and got the nozzle tightened down to the smallest size I could. Pressing down the trigger as firmly as I could and spraying from about two feet away produced a very fine stream.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

FUCK AROUND AND FIND OUT


yes I was very dumb not to use cardboard, which I have now. not only for testing, but to catch all the spray that gets in all sorts of spots besides the wall

H110Hawk posted:

Textured walls gain character over time as you patch them. You can tell funny stories about them or leave them as mysteries for future generations.

lmao

AFewBricksShy
Jun 19, 2003

of a full load.



SourKraut posted:

A handyman we know tore out the shower and tile pieces we'd need to replace, and we find out that they didn't water proof/tile the shower properly, and often simply grouted the tile to drywall in places and not even cement board.
...
The other part is that after reading here and elsewhere, I had somewhat convinced myself that something like Ditra or Kerdi would be the way to go for waterproofing, but their quote is for a liquid membrane system, and they told me that not all of their staff is trained on it, and it could be a lot more expensive since they said the entire system has to be Schluter to get the warranty.

I was all set to do the initial downpayment for the work, but now I'm second guessing myself.

Sorry, I can't comment on the contractor issue because I don't know your area. However I can comment on the waterproofing.

If your house is anything more than 15-20 years old, no waterproofing on shower walls isn't exactly shocking. Neither is the tile directly adhered to drywall, I would hope it was at least greenboard, but I don't think I started seeing durarock/hardibacker specified on jobs until about 15 years ago.

As recently as 2009, we did a hotel in Philly that was just thinset on greenboard, no waterproofing.

The idea is that you really only need waterproofing where there is standing water. Tile itself is inherently waterproof, and on a vertical surface, the water is just running down the surface. Add that to the typical usage a home shower gets and you don't really need it. However in this day and age, especially with the liquid applied waterproofing, it's often just easier to do it as a just in case. Also grouts are far more than just standard cement now, and they also tend to have water resistant properties.

Even today we will often just run the waterproofing about a foot or so up the shower walls and just go tile on backer board, and it is all perfectly to code. This isn't small jobs, so taking the extra half day to waterproof the entire shower adds up (2 hours per shower x 250 units = $80,000), so it's often not done.

That said, when I do my own house later this year, I'm going to be waterproofing the floor, 4" up the walls around the perimeter of the room, and up to the level of the shower head.

Regarding liquid applied vs. schluter.

gently caress schluter waterproofing. I have no idea how they have gotten it out there that they are the be-all/end-all of waterproofing that everyone must have or you're all going to die.

Laticrete developed a sheet based waterproof membrane back in the 70's called 9235. You paint this black latex poo poo on the ground, lay out the sheet, then paint over the sheet. The sheet provides strength and also allows the membrane to flex and act as a crack suppression membrane.

In the early '00's they developed Hydroban, which wasn't great when it first came out. It was a fluid applied waterproofing, but had no sheet. It still met all the specs of the 9235 waterproofing. Mapei, Ardex, Custom, and I think bostick, all rolled out their own versions, which got much better over the years. Our shop will pretty much use redgard as a default, unless we're going for the mega-warranty. Aquadefense is just as good as Redgard, we haven't used ardex's very much and considering I'm not 100% positive that bostick has one, you can infer how much we use that.

Redgard (and the others) work by painting a layer, waiting for it to dry, then painting another layer. You end up with pretty much a 1/8" thick latex sheet that stretches and holds water, but the mortar still sticks nicely to it. You only need a sheet membrane in corner transitions, we will also tend to use it if there's a particularly nasty active crack in a concrete floor (this will rarely present itself in a home unless you're tiling a basement or it's a condo).

If you're going down over durarock, the seams between the boards should be mudded and taped by the taper (or your installer) prior to installation of the redgard.

Now on to schluter.

They are an awesome company. They dominate the market of transition strips in this area at least, and their products are ingenious. I absolutely love their shower curbs, their prefab pans are awesome, they just rolled out these awesome decorative shower shelves, and their linear drains are loving great because you can do 1 plane pitch to a drain, which allows you to have gently caress off huge tiles on the shower floor without worrying about lippage (even though the drains make it interesting union-wise, because the plumbers want to set the drains but they tie into the tiling system, so who does what...). Their waterproofing and crack supression, on the other hand...

Putting down kerdi sucks.
First off, you're stuck with using unmodified mortar.

Ok. Mortar tangent. Most of your mortars are what are called latex modified mortars. The latex generally improves work-ability, adds flexibility (on a microscopic scale), water resistance, and strength.
When you add water to the mortar, it allows all of the powders and such to mix up, and as the moisture evaporates out of the mortar, the cement crystallizes and grows into itself. The latex helps strengthen this bond.

One of the issues with the larger format tiles now is that the moisture takes far longer to exit the tiles. If you set a 24x24 porcelain tile on a waterproof membrane with a 3mm/~1/8" joint and pull it up a day later, you'll have hard mortar around the first couple inches of the tile, and the mortar in the center of the tile will still be "Green" (wet). It can take a long rear end time for the mortar to fully dry out/cure. The reason for this is that the air has pretty much no outlet other than the absurdly narrow grout joint. The tile is impermeable, the waterproof membrane is the same, and your grout inhibits airflow as well (which is the point) The latex not only helps to add strength during this time, but also can have other additives to pretty much self cure and not rely solely on evaporation to do the job.

Unmodified mortars don't have the latex, and don't have many of the other fun additives that can be added. They are pretty much sand, portland cement and maybe lime. Unmodified mortars are perfectly fine to set a mosaic or something, but pretty much anything over 8"x8" (20cm) you should be using a modified mortar, as the long curing time (in the center of the tile) can lead to a weakened bond and cause the tiles to pop.

Ok, detour over back to schluter.

Schluter (in the States) only allows you to use unmodified mortars when setting ditra and kerdi. So right off the bat, you're using a crappy mortar. So now you have to comb out the mortar to where you want the sheet. Then you lay the sheet out, and dry trowel the sheet into the mortar to ensure it adheres. Then you lay out your next sheet, comb it out, rinse and repeat, and this would require 2 guys to be able to do it quickly. Contrast this to a guy dipping a paint roller into some red goo and just going hog wild on a floor.
The one plus is that once your kerdi is down you can start tiling right away, vs. having to wait with the fluid systems.

So now you're setting your 24x24 porcelain tile on the wall, and you're still stuck with having to use unmodified mortars. You can bite the bullet and use the proper modified stuff, but now you don't have a warranted installation.
Conveniently they (schluter) sell modified mortars that will work with kerdi, but you can only use their mortars and that's bullshit because there are way better mortars out there to use.

Ditra is even worse.
You've got your unmodified mortars, but now you also have to trowel the mortar into the little voids 4 different ways to ensure the mortar keys into the little trapeziod voids that hold the tile down. You also have to do this prior to when you start setting the tile, so you're combing out mortar 3 times before your tile is able to be laid down.

Also both of them are expensive as gently caress.

As a point to point: (all pricing with no markup/taxes)
RedGard Per SqFt: ~1.65/SqFt
Material - $.45
Labor - ~1.20 (depends on the installation). This is union wages.

Schluter Ditra - $6.10
Material - 1.80/SqFt
Labor - ~4.30

Kerdi's labor would be slightly less, but the material cost is the same. That's true numbers, by the way. $1.60 a foot with my discount, plus .20 a foot for the mortar to stick it on the wall.

The only place we use Ditra or kerdi is Princeton U. I have no idea how Schluter got as entrenched in there as they are, but they accept no substitutions.

AFewBricksShy fucked around with this message at 15:45 on May 22, 2020

daslog
Dec 10, 2008





So I am supposed to bleach the well because that is what you do when you own a house with a well and you had bacteria come up in the water test. It's not e coli fortunately so I don't have to worry about that.

The procedure looks pretty simple but I have a challenge getting out the wellhead. I haven't seen a well before with a giant concrete lid on it like this one has. Do I just slide this thing over?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004





That's super helpful info, thanks

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

daslog posted:

So I am supposed to bleach the well because that is what you do when you own a house with a well and you had bacteria come up in the water test. It's not e coli fortunately so I don't have to worry about that.

The procedure looks pretty simple but I have a challenge getting out the wellhead. I haven't seen a well before with a giant concrete lid on it like this one has. Do I just slide this thing over?



That would be my guess. Thats old school. You're not allowed to haveinstall well heads below grade anymore.

I've seen them just directly buried, and I've also seen them in concrete vaults, which is what it looks like you've got.

daslog
Dec 10, 2008





Motronic posted:

That would be my guess. Thats old school. You're not allowed to haveinstall well heads below grade anymore.

I've seen them just directly buried, and I've also seen them in concrete vaults, which is what it looks like you've got.

The disclosure listed it as a drilled well, but the seller was an idiot and that sure looks like a dug well to me. This place was build in 1942. Looks like I have some digging to do. I really don't want to get dirt in there so I'll have to dig out around it and get the cover just high enough to pour the bleach in it.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Oh if that's a 40s well yeah, it could be dug and you're looking at the top of the casing. Wonder what you're going to find down there - is the pump in the well or do you have a jet pump in the basement?

Omne
Jul 12, 2003

Orangedude Forever



Dumb question: I have a one year old new construction home. The door hardware on my back patio French doors is showing some rust (as well as a hose bib). Do I need to replace them, or is there something else I can do to make them look good-as-new?

ETA: Also, there is a slight gap between a window frame next to the front door, and the overall front door frame. It's small and tapers as you move up the window frame, but I'm not sure what to use to seal that gap.

Omne fucked around with this message at 17:10 on May 22, 2020

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

AFewBricksShy posted:

An awesome writeup

Holy poo poo, thanks for this! It was reassuring to hear about AquaDefense/RedGard, etc.

The house itself is 26 years old, but the shower tile work is probably more like 10-12. The house used to be plumbed with poly-B, and at some point they must have had a major leak or took advantage of the poly-B lawsuit, because copper pipe was plumbed through the attic everywhere, but the poly-B was left behind. When the handyman opened up the pony wall while chasing the mold, we could see where the old poly-B had been cut and left behind in the wall space.

I'm glad to hear though that one of the liquid membrane systems would be completely sufficient, because it seems online, everyone is pushing Schluter systems, and yet the handyman hadn't seen it used before either.

The estimator had told me they generally just use Mapei products, probably because they're often affiliated with Floor & Decor I'm guessing, but they prefer the polymer-modified thinsets and such. They also defaulted the quote to 12"x24" tile for the shower estimate, but said we could use smaller tile if we wanted to. I'm torn between going with larger tile to minimize grout lines, or using smaller tile with more grout lines and trying to be a lot more diligent about scrubbing the grout clean more often.

Edit: Oh, and one last question. I'd seen some references to using the Laticrete waterproof membrane in the corners/etc., and it can be used with AquaDefense too. Is that something you've seen? The reasoning I saw online is that it's hard to get the liquid membrane into the corner transitions, especially at floors and such, so I'd read where they saturate the membrane with the liquid system, set it after an initial coat, and then once everything has cured, go over with a second coat. Here's the fabric I'd seen mentioned: https://www.contractorsdirect.com/L...Membrane-Fabric

In this case, the company said they'd be using a PVC liner when re-doing the pan, but I wasn't sure how the liner-to-aquadefense transition works.

SourKraut fucked around with this message at 17:12 on May 22, 2020

daslog
Dec 10, 2008





Motronic posted:

Oh if that's a 40s well yeah, it could be dug and you're looking at the top of the casing. Wonder what you're going to find down there - is the pump in the well or do you have a jet pump in the basement?

There are wires coming out of the foundations from the pump, so I assume the pump is in the well.

socketwrencher
Apr 10, 2012

Be still and know.

AFewBricksShy posted:



As a point to point: (all pricing with no markup/taxes)
RedGard Per SqFt: ~1.65/SqFt
Material - $.45
Labor - ~1.20 (depends on the installation). This is union wages.

Schluter Ditra - $6.10
Material - 1.80/SqFt
Labor - ~4.30

Kerdi's labor would be slightly less, but the material cost is the same. That's true numbers, by the way. $1.60 a foot with my discount, plus .20 a foot for the mortar to stick it on the wall.

This is really interesting, thanks for sharing it.

Assuming you're talking from bare studs to being ready to tile, and CBU + liquid membrane vs. drywall + Kerdi, I can't see how Kerdi is 3x+ as much. Also not sure how you're accounting for the extra day to apply a 2nd coat of Redgard. Can't speak to Ditra.

AFewBricksShy
Jun 19, 2003

of a full load.



socketwrencher posted:

This is really interesting, thanks for sharing it.

Assuming you're talking from bare studs to being ready to tile, and CBU + liquid membrane vs. drywall + Kerdi, I can't see how Kerdi is 3x+ as much. Also not sure how you're accounting for the extra day to apply a 2nd coat of Redgard. Can't speak to Ditra.

I'm not talking bare studs. When we go in I expect to see taped backer board (be it hardie or durarock). My job starts at the waterproofing, so whatever the carpenters have done doesn't really matter for my accounting.

There isn't a second day for redgard.
Basically long story short, figuring a standard 3x3 or 4x3 shower, I can get 5 showers a day with one guy using aquadefense or redgard.
Using 2 guys I can get 3 a day using kerdi.
This is walls and floors by the way.

SourKraut posted:

The estimator had told me they generally just use Mapei products...They also defaulted the quote to 12"x24" tile for the shower estimate, but said we could use smaller tile if we wanted to.
Mapei is a fantastic company, if they go all mapei you probably can't be steered wrong.
Tile size on the walls is 100% personal preference. I personally like the larger tiles.
On the floor, it depends on how much pitch you need. This is where schluter shines with the linear drains they have, you can have a single piece shower floor if you want, because the entire shower pitches to the drain. See sketch 1. The more you need to pitch the smaller your tile needs to go (sketch 3) or you can end up with lippage, unless you can live with a joint going to each corner, (sketch 2).

quote:

Oh, and one last question. I'd seen some references to using the Laticrete waterproof membrane in the corners/etc., and it can be used with AquaDefense too. Is that something you've seen? The reasoning I saw online is that it's hard to get the liquid membrane into the corner transitions, especially at floors and such, so I'd read where they saturate the membrane with the liquid system, set it after an initial coat, and then once everything has cured, go over with a second coat. Here's the fabric I'd seen mentioned: https://www.contractorsdirect.com/L...Membrane-Fabric

The liquid applied membranes don't really bridge gaps between the wall and floor all that well, so we fabric reinforce those joints. We call them toilet paper rolls (because that's the size they are), and yes we use those all the time. That is the fabric I'm talking about with the 9235 waterproofing system.

quote:

In this case, the company said they'd be using a PVC liner when re-doing the pan, but I wasn't sure how the liner-to-aquadefense transition works.

See sketch 4.
Not 100% sure on the system they are using, but generally the pvc pan is behind the backer board and it pretty much creates a redundant shower pan.
My tubby rear end is in the office moreso than the field, so this might not be 100% perfect but I'm pretty sure it's correct.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

daslog posted:

There are wires coming out of the foundations from the pump, so I assume the pump is in the well.

Yep, sounds like a submersible then. This should be interesting. Take pictures.

socketwrencher
Apr 10, 2012

Be still and know.

AFewBricksShy posted:

I'm not talking bare studs. When we go in I expect to see taped backer board (be it hardie or durarock). My job starts at the waterproofing, so whatever the carpenters have done doesn't really matter for my accounting.

There isn't a second day for redgard.
Basically long story short, figuring a standard 3x3 or 4x3 shower, I can get 5 showers a day with one guy using aquadefense or redgard.
Using 2 guys I can get 3 a day using kerdi.
This is walls and floors by the way.

Cool, thanks for the clarification.

Carpenters generally donít do that where Iím at, they rough it and theyíre gone to make way for utilities. Iíd probably use a liquid membrane in your situation too.

Guess the 2nd coat of Redgard depends on when in the day the 1st coat is applied, and the temp/humidity. I worked in Oregon/WA for a stretch and things could take a while to dry/cure.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION


Thank you again for the additional useful info! Our floor tiles now are basically 2"x2" squares, sloped toward a central circular drain. I'm assuming it'd be difficult to change the drain location without slab work? I was thinking about a linear drain, but it'd be centered in the shower and need the sides sloping to it.

And he hadn't mentioned anything about the reinforcing fabric at the gaps, but I was going to ask about it/confirm they would.

AFewBricksShy
Jun 19, 2003

of a full load.



SourKraut posted:

Thank you again for the additional useful info! Our floor tiles now are basically 2"x2" squares, sloped toward a central circular drain. I'm assuming it'd be difficult to change the drain location without slab work? I was thinking about a linear drain, but it'd be centered in the shower and need the sides sloping to it.

And he hadn't mentioned anything about the reinforcing fabric at the gaps, but I was going to ask about it/confirm they would.

If you have easy access to the plumbing and feel like having a plumber come out to move the drain go nuts but generally in my experience drains tend to stay where they are.

You can pitch 2x2 mosaics any which way you want so thatís no problem at all. Generally we start to worry with something over 4Ē.

Regarding the fabric, depending on the size of the gaps they might be able to use a mesh tape. Itís pretty much just providing a structure for the latex to adhere to.
If youíre really concerned you can ask them to flood test the pan, which is to dam it up, fill the drain and then fill the whole thing with water and see if it will hold water. If this wasnít specified prior to your pricing though donít be surprised if they give you an add because it ends up being lost time. Again Iím coming from a construction/ contractor angle, so Iím looking to streamline my work as much as possible.

AFewBricksShy fucked around with this message at 21:52 on May 22, 2020

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




AFewBricksShy posted:

I can comment on the waterproofing.

Holy poo poo and god bless you for the quality sperg. I'm gonna link that in the op for future reference.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




peanut posted:

The DIY mod said I could make this.

We're building a house. You're building a house, or buying a house, or restoring a house, or rearranging your furniture, or you need a safe place to bitch about real estate and show off some things that don't belong in the Crappy Construction Megathread.

Let's make a nice thread together.

Links
http://www.zillow.com/ Real estate search
http://www.houzz.com/ Design eye candy
http://www.roomsketcher.com/ Used below VVV

WATERPROOFING God
https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...0#post505045743


daslog
Dec 10, 2008





Motronic posted:

Yep, sounds like a submersible then. This should be interesting. Take pictures.

Welp. Turns out it's a drilled well where the head is 15 feet deep?



actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

FUCK AROUND AND FIND OUT


I installed the dimmer successfully wish I had done this like... nine years ago

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

daslog posted:

Welp. Turns out it's a drilled well where the head is 15 feet deep?





I'm not suite sure how you get the well head off there......that's a new setup for me.

Also looks like a really great setup for getting groundwater contamination in there (which may be exactly why you need to dump bleach down it). I know you're just trying to solve an immediate problem here, but I'd be planning for a mid term project of pulling the pump up (replacing it or the foot valve if necessary while you're in there), extending the casing and wiring and pipe above grade and re-capping it to modern standards.

No doubt you have a local well drilling company who have done this with exactly that style well hundreds of times by now.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

How did a home inspector not comment on that? The moldy muck is at the sanitary cap height...

daslog
Dec 10, 2008





SourKraut posted:

How did a home inspector not comment on that? The moldy muck is at the sanitary cap height...

What I haven't shown in the pictures is the decorative structure that I had to take apart to even get to this. I can't blame the inspector for this one.

Edit: I found this. Apparently this is a New Hampshire thing.

https://www.des.nh.gov/organization...s/dwgb-1-14.pdf

daslog fucked around with this message at 10:26 on May 23, 2020

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

daslog posted:

What I haven't shown in the pictures is the decorative structure that I had to take apart to even get to this. I can't blame the inspector for this one.

Edit: I found this. Apparently this is a New Hampshire thing.

https://www.des.nh.gov/organization...s/dwgb-1-14.pdf

That particular pit setup isn't something I've seen, but everything in the PDF is pretty standard everywhere now. The fact that you have that pit would seem to make extending the casing a pretty easy job.

Oppression
Jan 16, 2004


Pillbug

Anyone have some suggestions on how to fix up my horsey doors a little bit? Seems like there is some weathering/discoloration on both the door and the carving, and at the bottom of the facade there is more significant damage to the wood with little pieces having fallen off of it I think. It's a solid walnut double door with horses on both sides that face outward only. I have no idea what the symbols on them mean.

The house we have is from 1969, think there weren't storm doors on the house for the first 30 years. Or it could be from sun damage for all I know. Would trying to just apply stain over the existing discoloration be advised or am I going to have to get sanding? I'm worried about causing worse damage to it by approaching this the wrong way.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

FUCK AROUND AND FIND OUT


I'm sure I'm not the only one here using the pandemic to clean up and get rid of unneeded stuff. Fortunately it's just me and I only use like 700 square feet, but it's amazing how you can always find something. Like the second shelf above the washer/dryer that just holds some extra shelving and stuff for my fridge that I've never touched since I moved in nine years ago.

Is there any good way to get to all the dust that piles up behind the washer/dryer? it's a really awkward angle and the swiffer doesn't fit back there well (also I have very little leverage), and I''m certainly not going to disconnect the appliances.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«146 »