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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




The neighborhood.

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originalnickname
Mar 9, 2005

tree


Yay house sperg chat!

I also am a homeowner and like doing things to my house. I just finished fixing up my master bathroom which was absolutely horrible. I attempted to turn it into something not as horrible...

Before (I pulled out the ugly heavy solid cultured stone green corner tub, then I re-did the glass bricks so they're actually waterproof and not leaking tons of water into my exterior wall and insulation when rain blows against that side of the house)



after... I didn't do the glass or the cabinet, I had lots of help with the shower manifold, but all of the framing and drywall tile and all that other crap are me, so I can always look at my visible mistakes and remember why I can never do any of that for a living.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Dang! That looks like a whole different house. Goongrats Edit: I love those old school tiny stone tiles in the shower.

Here's some foundation, with some generic modern houses in the background.

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peanut fucked around with this message at 12:08 on Apr 12, 2016

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

TLDR: I need to design a vanity for this weird wall shape in a bathroom.

Pic

wormil fucked around with this message at 00:50 on Apr 15, 2016

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


peanut posted:

Dang! That looks like a whole different house. Goongrats Edit: I love those old school tiny stone tiles in the shower.

Here's some foundation, with some generic modern houses in the background.



Why can I see your whole floor plan, down to the closets, in poured concrete?

PuTTY riot
Nov 16, 2002


Zhentar posted:

Why can I see your whole floor plan, down to the closets, in poured concrete?

asia

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Hella earthquake safety. Maximize the beams that go all the way from foundation to roof.

Wormil- it's a tricky shape, so I'd probably keep the cabinet but repaint and change the knobs. Swap the round sink bowl out for something big and rectangular, and raise the mirror to line up with the windows.

peanut fucked around with this message at 01:12 on Apr 13, 2016

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

nm

wormil fucked around with this message at 00:49 on Apr 15, 2016

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Look on Houzz for more fancy bathrooms than you ever thought possible. Definitely do not use a pedestal sink anywhere you want to do more than a quick hand wash.

peanut fucked around with this message at 05:20 on Apr 13, 2016

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



wormil, honestly that built in counter makes the best of a bad space unless you want to put a free standing oval bath there (and block your closet). Personally I'd say replace it with a tasteful copy, maybe a wider sink, nice taps, big sliding doors on the cabinet below so it's a blank wood or lacquer finish.

xwing
Jul 2, 2007
red leader standing by

peanut posted:

Look on Houzz for more fancy bathrooms than you ever thought possible.

I worked for a client that was upgrading a home for his mother-in-law. He was about 6'-6" and couldn't stand that the home had a ceiling at 8-4"... so we made plans to raise it all to 10' which was funny because his wife and M-I-L and were 5' tall Filipina women. As part of the submittals I saw the cost of the master bath fixtures and tile. $100K in just cost. No labor.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Cakefool posted:

wormil, honestly that built in counter makes the best of a bad space unless you want to put a free standing oval bath there (and block your closet). Personally I'd say replace it with a tasteful copy, maybe a wider sink, nice taps, big sliding doors on the cabinet below so it's a blank wood or lacquer finish.

I keep getting pushed in that direction and so far I have no better ideas. I'm starting to think about ways to disguise or break up the shape like a break front or different levels, and definitely a wider sink. The sliding door is interesting as I've thought about doing that to the closet.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


peanut posted:

Hella earthquake safety. Maximize the beams that go all the way from foundation to roof.

I figured, though I'm kind of skeptical that tying your closet to the foundation provides any earthquake safety. But then again I would probably go over kill if a 9 magnitude quake seemed like a real possibility.

That's going to be a crawlspace, correct? Did they put any insulation under the slab? (It doesn't look like it from the pic of the pour)

wormil posted:

I am about to remodel the bathroom off our family room. This part of the house has a slab foundation. I will gut the bathroom, insulate, replace all the pipes, then put it back together. No problem. Looking for advice on the putting it back together part. The back wall is bumped out for some reason and I'm trying to decide what to do with it. The current sink cabinet was built in place and I hate it, I've always hated it. I want something modern, clean and simple but I also need to store towels and various crap used by a family of four. I do not want another weird shaped cabinet but I am open to suggestions.

Off your family room? That is quite a weird bathroom. Do you need a tub/shower in there?

Is the bumpout an overhang, or does the slab also bump out? If it's an overhang, you probably want to pull up the sub floor to seal & insulate there as well.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Zhentar posted:

I figured, though I'm kind of skeptical that tying your closet to the foundation provides any earthquake safety. But then again I would probably go over kill if a 9 magnitude quake seemed like a real possibility.

That's going to be a crawlspace, correct? Did they put any insulation under the slab? (It doesn't look like it from the pic of the pour)

The closets look like overkill, but you can see how the second floor closets line up in the floorplan.

You're right about the crawlspace. They are always open vented here due to a high water table. (I'm like 10 feet above sea level.) It only has a waterproof sheet underneath (and a pagan charm from the land blessing ceremony buried within). Insulation will go on top when the floor base is put in.

peanut fucked around with this message at 17:58 on Apr 13, 2016

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


wormil posted:

I am about to remodel the bathroom off our family room. This part of the house has a slab foundation. I will gut the bathroom, insulate, replace all the pipes, then put it back together. No problem. Looking for advice on the putting it back together part. The back wall is bumped out for some reason and I'm trying to decide what to do with it. The current sink cabinet was built in place and I hate it, I've always hated it. I want something modern, clean and simple but I also need to store towels and various crap used by a family of four. I do not want another weird shaped cabinet but I am open to suggestions.

TLDR: I need to design around this weird wall shape in a bathroom.


Floor plan. Blue lines are approximate locations of current plumbing.



Pic



Is that an electrical panel in your bathroom? That's... not allowed anymore. It hasn't been allowed for some time. You might want to talk to your local code authority. They may make you move the panel if you do a remodel.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

nm

wormil fucked around with this message at 00:48 on Apr 15, 2016

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




I like the filled-in holes from bolts of other foundations. And the wedge locks on the steel bars. They're taking off the wooden frame tomorrow~

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kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


wormil posted:

Oh, I'll check on that. Edit; that became code in 1993, this bathroom predates that by decades.

How much work are you doing in this bathroom? Depending on the extent of your renovation, your city/county may make you move that panel. You would need to ask them.

xwing
Jul 2, 2007
red leader standing by

kid sinister posted:

How much work are you doing in this bathroom? Depending on the extent of your renovation, your city/county may make you move that panel. You would need to ask them.

Don't mention who you are or location. The last thing you want to do is cause yourself extra cost because you tried "to do the right thing". In most jurisdictions there's a threshold for what a renovation is considered. For me it's 30% of the property value. This is for permits and code compliance. So if you stay below that you can do many things without triggering full compliance with current codes. Here that's used to shut down localities that are real pricks and want you to get a permit for replacing windows and then be fully compliant with the energy code (insulation and all that entails).

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Plumbing

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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Wormil it's ok to change your mind We like you and want you to have an awesome bathroom <3

Antifreeze Head
Jun 6, 2005

It begins

Pillbug

peanut posted:

Here's some foundation, with some generic modern houses in the background.



Those windows in the modern homes are so tiny. Is there some aversion to natural light in Japan? Or means of escaping in case of fire?

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




West-facing windows (like those three houses) are the least important because of the "harsh afternoon sun." South-facing windows are the big full-length sliders. Bathrooms and storage tend to be on the North side.

Old Japanese houses are like all windows and sliding doors, and not enough walls. It sucks for furniture placement. My generation is still trying to find a balance between function, light, and privacy...

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

peanut posted:

Wormil it's ok to change your mind We like you and want you to have an awesome bathroom <3

Nothing changed on my end. I was hoping for a clever solution to the weird shape problem but there doesn't seem to be one. I would prefer to tear out the bathtub and replace it with a shower. But my wife is fighting me tooth and nail insisting that we must have a bathtub in that room. What the gently caress for I don't know because no one takes baths in this house, we all take showers.

I'm also pissed because somehow my front picture window got broken, no idea how, and that will cost $400-500 to replace. My wife thinks a neighbor kid did it but it doesn't look like an impact to me and it's inside, not outside. It looks like it cracked inside the frame from the bottom up. And I have tree issues $$$$. And this bathroom $$$$. Lately it's one thing after another, or really all at once. I pay rear end tons of money for home insurance and they don't cover anything. I'm really over being a home owner. /rant

Stay single, live at home, that's my advice.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




The window is definitely a priority. I hope this delay leads to finding something great while you wait.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


peanut posted:

Plumbing



Hot water lines with no insulation in direct contact with concrete? Definitely would not be my first choice. And that's in a vented crawlspace? I assume you're supposed to close the vents in winter?

wormil posted:

I would prefer to tear out the bathtub and replace it with a shower. But my wife is fighting me tooth and nail insisting that we must have a bathtub in that room. What the gently caress for I don't know because no one takes baths in this house, we all take showers.

Cleaning animals or small children? (Those of guests or future home buyers, if you don't have any)

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I've been planning on using cpvc for the replacement pipes. Should I reconsider and do PEX? Is there a good resource, maybe on youtube, for installing pex? (I see a ton of videos but not sure if someone has a specific recommendation)

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Zhentar posted:

Hot water lines with no insulation in direct contact with concrete? Definitely would not be my first choice. And that's in a vented crawlspace? I assume you're supposed to close the vents in winter?

Hmm... idk if more insulation is coming. The water heater will be Right There, and only the kitchen and shower will get hot water anyway I think I just realized why the bath is always on the ground floor here.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


wormil posted:

I've been planning on using cpvc for the replacement pipes. Should I reconsider and do PEX? Is there a good resource, maybe on youtube, for installing pex? (I see a ton of videos but not sure if someone has a specific recommendation)

CPVC is the cheapest crap that's still adequate enough to be legal. It's brittle to start with, gets worse as it ages, and it's more work to install and repair than PEX. The only strength I can think of that doesn't involve spending less money is that it's easier to install in neat-looking straight lines. I would not use CPVC in my home.

I don't know about any videos, but if you want to do some reading this design guide can tell you a lot about using PEX. For DIYing one bathroom, you should go with the cinch-clamp system. The expansion systems are arguably better, but the benefits are minor and the required tools are much more expensive.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Zhentar posted:

Hot water lines with no insulation in direct contact with concrete? Definitely would not be my first choice.

Isn't that exactly what radiant floor heating is?

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




That is a thing I want but can't afford ( ;∀;)

wooger
Apr 16, 2005

YOU RESENT?

kid sinister posted:

Isn't that exactly what radiant floor heating is?

I thought water based radiant is usually pipes running in slots in special foam blocks, over the sub-floor, with a radiant barrier on the bottom to prevent the heat leaking down.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Here the entire floor slab rests on at least 4 inches of insulation underneath but usually more, also on the sides. PEX lines are just cast straight into this slab. No need to fiddle with anything when the floor slab is separate from the stuff that faces the outside and it gets nice and toasty.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




It rarely goes below 10 C here I just gave those pink and blue tubes a squeeze. The colored part is an insulation sleeve, with the actual water pipe inside.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


kid sinister posted:

Isn't that exactly what radiant floor heating is?

Precisely. I don't want my shower water radiant heating my crawlspace.

peanut posted:

It rarely goes below 10 C here I just gave those pink and blue tubes a squeeze. The colored part is an insulation sleeve, with the actual water pipe inside.

Huh, okay then. I've never seen color coded insulation used in the US.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Gettin' framey

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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Elegant traditional something. The wood was done by machine in a factory, but the carpenters still need to chisel some pieces to make them fit well.

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The Sexual Shiite
Apr 11, 2007


peanut posted:

Elegant traditional something. The wood was done by machine in a factory, but the carpenters still need to chisel some pieces to make them fit well.



I'm the penis joint.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


peanut posted:

Elegant traditional something. The wood was done by machine in a factory, but the carpenters still need to chisel some pieces to make them fit well.



Your framing is bizarre and fascinating. Those little jacks are permanent, I'm guessing? What's in between the sill beams and the concrete (it's much thicker than typical US sill seals)?


edit: and what is used for the subfloor? Those square look fairly large, so do you use something very strong or do you just have bouncy floors?

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kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


wooger posted:

I thought water based radiant is usually pipes running in slots in special foam blocks, over the sub-floor, with a radiant barrier on the bottom to prevent the heat leaking down.

That's one option for radiant heating with water. Another is to run the pipes on a floor, then pour concrete over them. It's usually used for radiant heating on a slab/basement, because then you don't have to worry about the extra weight or the concrete leaking to the floor below while pouring.

kid sinister fucked around with this message at 21:02 on Apr 20, 2016

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