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FuzzySlippers
Feb 6, 2009



Thanks for the replies. The in laws aggro I'm getting makes navigating this worse. As it is I'm also trying to sort through the permit process for a problem tree removal that is extensive because it's on a protected slope and the people who don't live here are confused why I can't just go chop down a 100ft+ tree myself in a dense neighborhood with aggressive tree protection. To make matters worse it turns out it isn't even on my property and is on a slim thin property wedged between me and the back neighbors which ends in a mobile home. Apparently the owner is a bit of a hermit and the neighbors go years without seeing him. I've left a couple notes and a letter in his mailbox. This is going to be more fun.

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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009





Grimey Drawer

FuzzySlippers posted:

Thanks for the replies. The in laws aggro I'm getting makes navigating this worse. As it is I'm also trying to sort through the permit process for a problem tree removal that is extensive because it's on a protected slope and the people who don't live here are confused why I can't just go chop down a 100ft+ tree myself in a dense neighborhood with aggressive tree protection. To make matters worse it turns out it isn't even on my property and is on a slim thin property wedged between me and the back neighbors which ends in a mobile home. Apparently the owner is a bit of a hermit and the neighbors go years without seeing him. I've left a couple notes and a letter in his mailbox. This is going to be more fun.

The tree IS on your property. At least part/most of it. Which makes it YOUR PROBLEM to deal with (the portion that is on your property anyway). If your insurance company decides the tree was dead/diseased/otherwise a hazard that should have been taken care of previously they will go after the neighbor/their insurance provider.

Why do you think you need a permit for removing a fallen tree that is literally leaning on your house? I've never heard of such a thing.

FuzzySlippers
Feb 6, 2009



Motronic posted:

The tree IS on your property. At least part/most of it. Which makes it YOUR PROBLEM to deal with (the portion that is on your property anyway). If your insurance company decides the tree was dead/diseased/otherwise a hazard that should have been taken care of previously they will go after the neighbor/their insurance provider.

Why do you think you need a permit for removing a fallen tree that is literally leaning on your house? I've never heard of such a thing.

No this doesn't have anything to do with the tree that fell on the house and was removed weeks ago. We had a risk assessment arborist come in and he identified another tree that needs to be removed because it's a probable hazard. Quite a bit of the canopy is over my property and if it fell it'd be on me but per the city ownership is about the trunk which is definitely his.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009





Grimey Drawer

FuzzySlippers posted:

No this doesn't have anything to do with the tree that fell on the house and was removed weeks ago. We had a risk assessment arborist come in and he identified another tree that needs to be removed because it's a probable hazard. Quite a bit of the canopy is over my property and if it fell it'd be on me but per the city ownership is about the trunk which is definitely his.

Forward the report to your insurance company. This is their problem.

FuzzySlippers
Feb 6, 2009



Motronic posted:

Forward the report to your insurance company. This is their problem.

Nope I've argued with them but they said until it falls on something it's my problem. Again this is not about whose fault was the tree that fell, I don't care, but removing a new tree.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009





Grimey Drawer

FuzzySlippers posted:

Nope I've argued with them but they said until it falls on something it's my problem. Again this is not about whose fault was the tree that fell, I don't care, but removing a new tree.

You've notified them. The only other thing you can do is notify the property owner's insurer.

It's officially not your problem, nor is there anything more you can do about it if it's not on your property.

I'm gonna tell you this again: your insurance company is awful.

FuzzySlippers
Feb 6, 2009



Motronic posted:

You've notified them. The only other thing you can do is notify the property owner's insurer.

It's officially not your problem, nor is there anything more you can do about it if it's not on your property.

I'm gonna tell you this again: your insurance company is awful.

No argument on the insurance.

edit: lol I literally just had a contractor call me and apologize but they don't want to bid the job. I sent them my insurance adjustor's report and they said it's such a low ball mess they don't want to get involved.

FuzzySlippers fucked around with this message at 21:53 on Aug 13, 2021

slave to my cravings
Mar 1, 2007

Got my mind on doritos and doritos on my mind.

Nothing quite like 0.5 inch of horizontal rain in 20 minutes to show you which windows are leaky.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

hey bebe




cruft posted:

Let me give you the flip side of this, from personal experience.

There's a hailstorm. We get hail here, it's a thing. Cars turn into golf balls, etc.

Some dude shows up from our insurance company. He's been going through every neighborhood. He looks up at our 3-month-old propanel roof, which is warrantied against hail damage for 20 years, and totals it.

Me: Are you sure it's totalled? It's brand new and it's got a 20-year warrant...
Adjuster: Okay, next house, bye

So I have a decision to make. Either I call the roofer out to completely replace the entire roof, or I lose insurance coverage on the roof.

The roofer did the work but everybody was heartbroken about throwing away those materials and wasting that money.

OK, let me see if I have this right.

Did you call in a claim under your homeowner's insurance, or did some rando just show up & say that he was from your insurance company?

If you called in a claim, that's the record that may affect your rates.

If the company adjuster came out, inspected your roof & said that it required a complete replacement due to hail damage, then as far as the insurance company is concerned, that's a payable claim (less your deductible) and it's up to you to decide whether or not you want them to pay you (and probably your mortgage company as well).

Your comment about losing roof coverage sounds like an agent (not an adjuster - we don't do that) saying that if you don't repair the hail damage, that they may drop you. Has this subject come up?

If you have a hail warranty and your propanel roof was damaged by hail, you should consider calling the company that warranties it and have them make it whole.


Motronic posted:

You've notified them. The only other thing you can do is notify the property owner's insurer.

It's officially not your problem, nor is there anything more you can do about it if it's not on your property.

I'm gonna tell you this again: your insurance company is awful.

Property insurance won't, and legally can't, do anything about a tree that is a potential risk but is not actually doing anything.

All that can be done is to notify the owner of the property that the tree is on about the hazard (send them a copy of the report); best to do it via certified mail, and keep a copy of everything in the event that the tree does indeed damage your dwelling. THEN your carrier can go after them.

Check with your local government about what you may be able to do about parts of a 'threatening' tree that hang over your airspace. You may be permitted to cut it back to the property line.

Vim Fuego
Jun 1, 2000

I just had an epiphany: the internet is useless!





Ultra Carp

Motronic posted:

I'm gonna tell you this again: your insurance company is awful.

:hai:

Coco13
Jun 6, 2004

My advice to you is to start drinking heavily.


Following up on this:

Coco13 posted:


My dad's convinced this orange extension cord, which was plugged into that socket, running through the basement ceiling to the dishwasher is something people sue over. He's also someone that cries wolf at every opportunity, and may just want to feel smart on seeing something the home inspector missed. How big of an issue is this?

I had a head of steam this afternoon and looked at the other end of that “extension” cord that was going behind the dishwasher. Well, it was going behind the dishwasher because that was the dishwasher electrical cord. As in, I just undid the orange electrical wire nuts to be able to feed the cord through the basement ceiling, also known as the kitchen floor. I moved it to the outlet underneath the sink that’s currently controlled by a switch. Given how often I used the dishwasher to wash instead of just as a drying rack, I’m fine switching what’s plugged in until I split that outlet so one side’s always on and the other’s controlled by the switch.

loving drilled a hole to send the cord through the flooring instead of just doing that.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Sirotan posted:

Anybody got one of these ladder stabilizers for their extension ladder: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Werner-Quick-Click-Ladder-Stabilizer-AC78/100658388 ?

How much of an improvement does it actually make? It isn't that expensive so I'll probably just buy one, but I need to get up about 20ft to paint the side of my house and have so far not managed to will myself up the ladder when I am by myself because it likes to start shaking back and forth a bit above one story. It doesn't actually move at the top or bottom so I'm wondering how much of a difference one of these could actually make?

Whether I have one of these or not I am planning to get a spotter/someone to hold the ladder while I am working on all the high bits that I have been unable to reach on my 10' step ladder.

It helps a bit, I have one for the little giant ladder I got a while back. They describe it as more of a stand off to keep the top of the ladder off the wall you're putting it up against and it's good for that. The extra width where it touches does also keep the ladder from twisting a bit if you have to reach over to one side or the other. I'd consider that and some kind of ladder platform for your painting stuff if you can get one that will work with your ladder before you start your job.

cruft
Oct 25, 2007



PainterofCrap posted:

OK, let me see if I have this right.

Did you call in a claim under your homeowner's insurance, or did some rando just show up & say that he was from your insurance company?

If you called in a claim, that's the record that may affect your rates.

If the company adjuster came out, inspected your roof & said that it required a complete replacement due to hail damage, then as far as the insurance company is concerned, that's a payable claim (less your deductible) and it's up to you to decide whether or not you want them to pay you (and probably your mortgage company as well).

Your comment about losing roof coverage sounds like an agent (not an adjuster - we don't do that) saying that if you don't repair the hail damage, that they may drop you. Has this subject come up?

If you have a hail warranty and your propanel roof was damaged by hail, you should consider calling the company that warranties it and have them make it whole.

I super appreciate your trying to help a goon out here, but this happened 8 years ago in a house we've since sold.

I don't remember much more about it than what I wrote before: some dude came out to our house without us asking and totalled our brand new roof, that the roofer said was in fine shape, and something has made me remember that if I didn't go ahead and get it replaced, I'd be looking at a real problem with any future claims (like, a laughed out of the office type problem). There's a very high chance I'm remembering multiple people as that one dude.

cruft fucked around with this message at 05:13 on Aug 14, 2021

Manager Hoyden
Mar 5, 2020



I'm hoping some folks in this thread can give me some advice.

It's time for a full kitchen remodel. The existing kitchen is terrible so it's all gotta go. Down to the studs. Thing is, we have no real idea what we want to replace it with as far as layout and design. It's a small, irregular kind of space but we want to get the most out of it, especially when it comes to storage.

How do we find out what we can do with this kitchen? We're not designers. We just know we hate the kitchen. I'm looking at "kitchen ideas" online but I'm not finding anything detailed or really anything about layouts or construction.

toplitzin
Jun 13, 2003


Manager Hoyden posted:

I'm hoping some folks in this thread can give me some advice.

It's time for a full kitchen remodel. The existing kitchen is terrible so it's all gotta go. Down to the studs. Thing is, we have no real idea what we want to replace it with as far as layout and design. It's a small, irregular kind of space but we want to get the most out of it, especially when it comes to storage.

How do we find out what we can do with this kitchen? We're not designers. We just know we hate the kitchen. I'm looking at "kitchen ideas" online but I'm not finding anything detailed or really anything about layouts or construction.

It helps to think about it in terms of the Work Triangle:

https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/kitchen-triangle-best-way-to-design-a-kitchen

Re storage: there are a lot of solutions that change cabinets to pull out shelves so you can actually get function out of the rear space of a deep cabinet. may be worth thinking about as well.

NomNomNom
Jul 20, 2008
Please Work Out

Hire it out. We knew we wanted an ikea kitchen, so we hired IKD, a firm that specializes in designing ikea kitchens. We had to measure our space and provide a rough layout of where the utilities were, they came back with detailed 3d renderings of the kitchen layout and complete shopping list to take to ikea. Cost was $300.

That sounds crazy, but they did an incredible job and helped "hack" the ikea products to fit some of our design choices, like a 36" range insert and 36" farm sink that ikea doesn't sell.

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007

Sweet 'N Sour
Can't
Melt
Steel Beams


I believe Ikea themselves also offer some design services, though obviously not as robust as even something like that IKD (that looks cool, I'm keeping that in my back pocket!). I'm somewhat in the same boat, though nowhere near ready to do anything about it yet. But our current layout is kind of bizarre, but I've been living with it so long that I can't really envision another way to use the space, so I'm hoping to someday be able to show a "blank" space to somebody and see what they come up with.

CancerCakes
Jan 10, 2006


The work triangle is fine, but how much do you really ping pong between your sink and fridge?

I set out our kitchen with an area for prep, an area for cooking, and an area for plating up/cleaning. Each area has its own dedicated counter space.

The fridge is in the prep area, along with most workspace for prep, with all the knives and boards, prep bowls, herbs spices etc within easy reach. The kettle is also in this area.

The plating up/cleaning area has the sink, dishwasher, bins, cupboards for plates bowls etc. Worktop here is prone to gathering dirty washing up, so restricting this area is actually a good thing.

Between them is the cooking area. Which has the smallest worktop area, but requires a lot of the storage - cooking spoons, spatulas, pans, woks, griddles, cooking trays, thermometers, mashers etc.

The only time I use the sink during prep is to fill the kettle, before I do anything else, and to wash ingredients, all of which are done at the same time prior to prep. So the distance between the sink and prep area is the least important.

The other thing is that the triangle is set up for single person kitchens, if you will be having multiple people cooking you need to take that into account - if I need to open the oven does that mean everyone else needs to leave?

slave to my cravings
Mar 1, 2007

Got my mind on doritos and doritos on my mind.

Manager Hoyden posted:

I'm hoping some folks in this thread can give me some advice.

It's time for a full kitchen remodel. The existing kitchen is terrible so it's all gotta go. Down to the studs. Thing is, we have no real idea what we want to replace it with as far as layout and design. It's a small, irregular kind of space but we want to get the most out of it, especially when it comes to storage.

How do we find out what we can do with this kitchen? We're not designers. We just know we hate the kitchen. I'm looking at "kitchen ideas" online but I'm not finding anything detailed or really anything about layouts or construction.

To get started, you could look at some of the houses in your neighborhood and if the construction is similar see if there are any pictures of recent kitchen renovations on Zillow or Redfin. No guarantee you will find anything good but may give you a sense of what other people have done with similar spaces.

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


If you aren't a computer graphics whiz print out some graph paper. Make sure it's square (you want one with a guide that says "this is one inch square" or similar.) draw out your space so it fits well on that sheet of paper with things like walls. Add utilities (drains) if you're on a slab, if you're raised foundation current utilities don't matter at all.

Draw all the things you want or need on another sheet, including clearances such as door swings and such as dashed lines. Cut them out. Now go to town. Tetris that stuff into place.

A gc should be able to help you with some of this stuff, but it might not be free.

How many square feet are we talking here?

Manager Hoyden
Mar 5, 2020



H110Hawk posted:

How many square feet are we talking here?

Like 9' x 12' with one open wall into the dining room. It's like a cooking closet. It would be easy to just do a standard galley style layout, but one complicating feature is a full height, floor to ceiling window on one of the long sides.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





(tangent) I am really cranky that the author of that article didn't credit Lillian Moller Gilbreth, who invented the thing. She broke ground in a lot of ways. Pioneering woman engineer, helped invent industrial psychology, collaborated with her husband Frank in making time and motion studies a major industrial tool, applied industrial-process methods to homemaking and to living as a disabled person.

And, oh, yes, she and her husband had twelve children, resulting in two memoirs (by her daughters) and at least one movie. But that's not why she's important.

cruft
Oct 25, 2007




This is cool, I appreciate you bringing it up.

falz
Jan 29, 2005

01100110 01100001 01101100 01111010


Manager Hoyden posted:

I'm hoping some folks in this thread can give me some advice.

It's time for a full kitchen remodel. The existing kitchen is terrible so it's all gotta go. Down to the studs. Thing is, we have no real idea what we want to replace it with as far as layout and design. It's a small, irregular kind of space but we want to get the most out of it, especially when it comes to storage.

How do we find out what we can do with this kitchen? We're not designers. We just know we hate the kitchen. I'm looking at "kitchen ideas" online but I'm not finding anything detailed or really anything about layouts or construction.

So I used IKD (inspired kitchen design) to come up with something, which you then buy from Ikea. Ikea then also reviews the plan and sanity checks things.

I had a few revisions done, this album is a mishmash of a few designs with the final as the first few photos, and some finished-ish photos near the end: https://imgur.com/a/m3bsYuC

They asked questions like "are you moving walls to which my answers were NO, but yours may be yes. At bare minimum i would find their page that tells you what to document (draw each wall, find center of water line, windows, etc etc) then take all of that and you could self-service using the Ikea kitchen design app and just kinda draw some things up and see what seems visually appealing to you, especially since it's a $0 design tool and useful for inspiration even if you don't want to go Ikea.

https://inspiredkitchendesign.com/how-it-works/

ntan1
Apr 29, 2009

sempai noticed me


My kitchen breaks the entire work triangle concept. I've used it quite a bit for cooking and it works great, so remember to mostly use it as a starting point:



In reality, the pantry and the refrigerator are swapped. That was mostly a decision about practicality/closeness. Note that there is organization space of the range for placing food that is ready to be cooked, there is prep space on the island, and there is also plating space on the island.

just another
Oct 16, 2009

these dead towns that make the maps wrong now

My house has two fireplaces, formerly wood-burning, traditional fireplaces that were at some point converted to natural gas inserts. How unreasonable/costly would it be to convert them back to an open wood burning fireplace or a wood insert?

Without pulling the gas inserts, I'm guessing they would have had to destroy the smoke shelf and damper to get the gas flue in so maybe a wood burning insert is the way to go?

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


CancerCakes posted:

The work triangle is fine, but how much do you really ping pong between your sink and fridge?

I set out our kitchen with an area for prep, an area for cooking, and an area for plating up/cleaning. Each area has its own dedicated counter space.

The fridge is in the prep area, along with most workspace for prep, with all the knives and boards, prep bowls, herbs spices etc within easy reach. The kettle is also in this area.

The plating up/cleaning area has the sink, dishwasher, bins, cupboards for plates bowls etc. Worktop here is prone to gathering dirty washing up, so restricting this area is actually a good thing.

Between them is the cooking area. Which has the smallest worktop area, but requires a lot of the storage - cooking spoons, spatulas, pans, woks, griddles, cooking trays, thermometers, mashers etc.

The only time I use the sink during prep is to fill the kettle, before I do anything else, and to wash ingredients, all of which are done at the same time prior to prep. So the distance between the sink and prep area is the least important.

The other thing is that the triangle is set up for single person kitchens, if you will be having multiple people cooking you need to take that into account - if I need to open the oven does that mean everyone else needs to leave?

We ignored the triangle when setting up our kitchen. The oven is on the other side of the room from the stovetop for instance, the fridge and freezer is also there. The sink is near the stove top however. Worked out well for us.

just another
Oct 16, 2009

these dead towns that make the maps wrong now

In our experience, long stretches of counter space trumps all else. We do a ton of cooking and it's never so dynamic that the triangle setup would be a substantial improvement to our quality of life versus uninterrupted counters.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Agreed, counter space is prime real estate. I wanna add more by getting a small kitchen island on wheels, just so I got another place to chop at, because the counter space goes fast when cooking.

Johnny Truant
Jul 22, 2008






His Divine Shadow posted:

Agreed, counter space is prime real estate. I wanna add more by getting a small kitchen island on wheels, just so I got another place to chop at, because the counter space goes fast when cooking.

I have one of those and it's fuckin amazing. It was built by the POs and needs some heavy duty fixing(why the gently caress they used joint compound to slap their remaining bits of baseboard trim on it will never make sense to me) but an extra 8sqft of counter space is :yum:

BonerGhost
Mar 9, 2007



Johnny Truant posted:

I have one of those and it's fuckin amazing. It was built by the POs and needs some heavy duty fixing(why the gently caress they used joint compound to slap their remaining bits of baseboard trim on it will never make sense to me) but an extra 8sqft of counter space is :yum:

My husband decided to fill nail holes in wood trim with joint compound too :iiam:

The first time I tried to write this reply I got stuck on their logic being "it dries white and is sticky".

Tiny Timbs
Sep 6, 2008



The work triangle isn't some inviolable rule and I'm not convinced it makes sense for a place that isn't a commercial kitchen or gets so much traffic it feels like one

B-Nasty
May 25, 2005



just another posted:

My house has two fireplaces, formerly wood-burning, traditional fireplaces that were at some point converted to natural gas inserts. How unreasonable/costly would it be to convert them back to an open wood burning fireplace or a wood insert?

Without pulling the gas inserts, I'm guessing they would have had to destroy the smoke shelf and damper to get the gas flue in so maybe a wood burning insert is the way to go?

Many inserts just slide right in to an existing fireplace, and then have a stainless liner sent down the chimney to vent it. The old fireplace may not have been modified at all.

You should hire a trustworthy sweep (good luck with that, most of these guys make HVAC companies look like honest folks) to do a full evaluation. One of the reasons it was converted may be because the chimney was in too poor of a condition to burn wood. In that case, you'd be looking at re-lining the chimney and/or fixing the cap in the minimum.

Not sure why you'd want to go back to wood, but I'd probably go with an wood-burning insert if you do. It is safer and more efficient, and way more forgiving of chimney/firebox issues than going traditional fireplace would be.

Johnny Truant
Jul 22, 2008






BonerGhost posted:

My husband decided to fill nail holes in wood trim with joint compound too :iiam:

The first time I tried to write this reply I got stuck on their logic being "it dries white and is sticky".

lol

I wish my fuckhead POs only used it for that. They literally used it as an adhesive... :psyduck:

Vintersorg
Mar 3, 2004

PRESIDENT OF THE OFFICIAL BRENDAN FRASER FAN CLUB





Gonna have to contact the local water supply place. All our taps are producing cloudy water - which is just air bubbles in this case - and also sometimes it causes the taps and shower to sorta choke... if that's the right word? Also on the water dispenser on my fridge it's dripping slowly so I am wondering if it's related to that. If it's separate i'll just call the appliance place since i just bought the drat thing but it never did this before so I think it's related to the water coming into the house. They shut it off a couple weeks ago for some upgrades we think since we are in a new development area and they were starting to build the rest of the area behind us.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



just another posted:

My house has two fireplaces, formerly wood-burning, traditional fireplaces that were at some point converted to natural gas inserts. How unreasonable/costly would it be to convert them back to an open wood burning fireplace or a wood insert?

Without pulling the gas inserts, I'm guessing they would have had to destroy the smoke shelf and damper to get the gas flue in so maybe a wood burning insert is the way to go?

I'll second B-nasty's info. I had a traditional open hearth fireplace with a damper, it was quaint and neat but sucked more heated air out of the home than it provided. I installed an Archgard NG insert that had two stainless lines going up through the chimney with a cap on top. The damper was not removed, just wired open. My folks have a woodburning insert and it is far preferable to the open hearth style, unless all you want is the ambience.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





just another posted:

My house has two fireplaces, formerly wood-burning, traditional fireplaces that were at some point converted to natural gas inserts. How unreasonable/costly would it be to convert them back to an open wood burning fireplace or a wood insert?

Without pulling the gas inserts, I'm guessing they would have had to destroy the smoke shelf and damper to get the gas flue in so maybe a wood burning insert is the way to go?
There's also a good chance that the chimney is not in good enough shape to remove smoke safely.

The work triangle was explicitly designed for one housewife to be able to use the kitchen efficiently. If you're likely to have two people in the kitchen, you need a design that supports keeping them out of each other's paths: a separate baking area, a separate grilling area, whatever.

Tezer
Jul 9, 2001



Arsenic Lupin posted:

The work triangle was explicitly designed for one housewife to be able to use the kitchen efficiently. If you're likely to have two people in the kitchen, you need a design that supports keeping them out of each other's paths: a separate baking area, a separate grilling area, whatever.

how many wives do you have

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I'm also of the opinion that work triangle is nice, but counterspace, (especially on BOTH SIDES OF THE STOVE) is crucial. And wide enough walk-spaces so that two people can get by each other.

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Johnny Truant
Jul 22, 2008






Speaking of fireplaces, I have a question regarding mine, pictured here:


My wonderful POs, in their cheap and garbage wisdom, have a fireplace... front? that is not the proper size. (I don't know the term for it - the actual metal insert pictured above)

Closer photo:


This leaves a good 2" gap, that I can handily for my fingers into and just reach around into the fireplace. Is this... awful? We're hoping to use the fireplace this winter, so I'll be calling a chimney company to inspect it, but I dunno if this is something I can buy the insert for and install myself, or if I should have the chimney people assess.

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