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Cithen
Mar 6, 2002




Pillbug

Does anyone have good recommendations/resources for washing machines & dryers? I've heard a lot of people complaining that their new appliances, with all the new eco-friendly models, have problems. For instance, mold build up with side load washers or clothes not drying well. I'd rather have a solid set of machines that will last than one with a bunch of bells and whistles.

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Magnus Praeda
Jul 18, 2003
The largess in the land.

Cithen posted:

Does anyone have good recommendations/resources for washing machines & dryers? I've heard a lot of people complaining that their new appliances, with all the new eco-friendly models, have problems. For instance, mold build up with side load washers or clothes not drying well. I'd rather have a solid set of machines that will last than one with a bunch of bells and whistles.

One of these will probably last long enough to become an heirloom your kids pass down to your grandkids.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Years ago I bought Kenmore washer and dryer, turns out they were possibly the most common ones ever made and sold by several manufacturers. All the parts are easily replaceable, commonly available, and cheap; plus there are tons of youtube videos on fixing them. There is something to be said for simple. Now if I could only find a refrigerator to match

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




I need to decide outlet, switch and niche location by Sunday The more the merrier, right?!

Magnus Praeda
Jul 18, 2003
The largess in the land.

wormil posted:

Years ago I bought Kenmore washer and dryer, turns out they were possibly the most common ones ever made and sold by several manufacturers. All the parts are easily replaceable, commonly available, and cheap; plus there are tons of youtube videos on fixing them. There is something to be said for simple. Now if I could only find a refrigerator to match

Sadly, thanks to Sears being run into the ground by a crazy Randian, Kenmore appliances kinda suck these days.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Zhentar posted:

Your framing is bizarre and fascinating. Those little jacks are permanent, I'm guessing? What's in between the sill beams and the concrete (it's much thicker than typical US sill seals)?


edit: and what is used for the subfloor? Those square look fairly large, so do you use something very strong or do you just have bouncy floors?

Those blue squares are insulation (approx 90x90cm.) The subfloor will go on after this rain lets up.

The jacks are permanent (earthquakes ). Our builder said that black layer on top of the foundation is a vent for the crawlspace. Older houses have brick-size vents at regular intervals, but this kind of skinny megavent is the new standard. It keeps animals out, at least.

Edit: 2018 Link http://www.interra-usa.com/page/joto-vent

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peanut fucked around with this message at 13:55 on Jun 21, 2018

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


We have an old hoover washer we bought used for 100 euros, lasted 5-6 years maybe. We line dry everything so no need for additional complexity with dryer functions.

xwing
Jul 2, 2007
red leader standing by

peanut posted:

Older houses have brick-size vents at regular intervals, but this kind of skinny megavent is the new standard. It keeps animals out, at least.

I like it... do you happen to know a name for the product or what it's called? Right now concrete and block in my area has doubled in cost. Not only do I think it's absurd that that was the standard anyway, but now that cost is way up I think that crawl space designs can make it back.

Cithen
Mar 6, 2002




Pillbug

Magnus Praeda posted:

One of these will probably last long enough to become an heirloom your kids pass down to your grandkids.

That seems exactly what I'm looking for!

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


peanut posted:

Those blue squares are insulation (approx 90x90cm.) The subfloor will go on after this rain lets up.

The jacks are permanent (earthquakes ). Our builder said that black layer on top of the foundation is a vent for the crawlspace. Older houses have brick-size vents at regular intervals, but this kind of skinny megavent is the new standard. It keeps animals out, at least.



So ~4x4 beams 1m O.C.

You subfloor must be fairly thick? 3/4"? 1"?

I'm pretty sure you need those jacks even without any earthquakes. The IRC doesn't offer any span tables for 4x4 joists, but spaces 1m OC a 1m maximum span sounds about right. I'm curious to see how the second floor will be framed.


xwing posted:

I like it... do you happen to know a name for the product or what it's called? Right now concrete and block in my area has doubled in cost. Not only do I think it's absurd that that was the standard anyway, but now that cost is way up I think that crawl space designs can make it back.

I think it is this "Joto Vent". But don't do it! Turn away from the dark side, choose the conditioned crawlspace!

xwing
Jul 2, 2007
red leader standing by

Zhentar posted:

I think it is this "Joto Vent". But don't do it! Turn away from the dark side, choose the conditioned crawlspace!

This is for my own personal interest. I have no professional use for it right now. My day work is entirely commercial/civic where a crawl space doesn't happen.

It is interesting to me though that raised homes with crawl spaces totally went out for slab on grade here in Florida. It's really localized our current situation though with concrete and block masons... we're looking at having to go to steel framed in our projects because all our budgets are getting blown. There's no reason any of that couldn't work for residential and be a cost effective though.

I'm also a total nerd with different stuff... we've got a AAC block manufacturer in the county and I've been itching to use that somehow.

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Ah, I'd thought you did more residential from some of your other comments.

I recently read about someone building their house with AAC (here). Interesting stuff, but I can't see a whole lot of value to it for residential construction (cold climate, at least) unless the installed cost is competitive with CMU blocks.

xwing
Jul 2, 2007
red leader standing by

Zhentar posted:

Ah, I'd thought you did more residential from some of your other comments.

I recently read about someone building their house with AAC (here). Interesting stuff, but I can't see a whole lot of value to it for residential construction (cold climate, at least) unless the installed cost is competitive with CMU blocks.

I used to design more residential. My current firm is all commercial and civic. I might moonlight doing some residential work in the coming years though for the added income since there's no real conflict of interest to do so.

The company referenced there in that article, Aercon, is in my county. So it should be decently competitive since shipping wouldn't really be a cost. I've been waiting for the opportunity to design for it, but it's so hard to get anyone to do anything different and I think I'd need a fire-rating issue to justify it. Who knows, I've got a contractor pretty much bending over to do use Tailored Foam and a synthetic stucco system where the I don't see the benefits at all.

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


Magnus Praeda posted:

Sadly, thanks to Sears being run into the ground by a crazy Randian, Kenmore appliances kinda suck these days.

Except Kenmore doesn't make anything at all (and they haven't in decades, if they ever did); the majority of their current lineup is made by Whirlpool and GE (Panasonic, Sanyo, LG, Bosch, and Electrolux also make appearances). They're usually identical or close to identical to the Whirlpool, GE, etc stuff.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Fun Shoe

Magnus Praeda posted:

One of these will probably last long enough to become an heirloom your kids pass down to your grandkids.

Seconding. Speed Queens are tough to kill and work like champions. Screw side load washers, I had nothing but trouble with our old one, and you can't soak really badly stained stuff in one. I used to bleach my chef's whites in the old top-loader and it was great.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




3cm subfloor and a buttload of scaffolding.

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max4me
Jun 15, 2003

by FactsAreUseless


peanut posted:


Old Japanese houses are like all windows and sliding doors, and not enough walls. It sucks for furniture placement. My generation is still trying to find a balance between function, light, and privacy...


I lived in Japan for a few years.

The old style houses were very cool, different, and cold.

They also made sense in that there wasnt alot of furniture, the elders never had to worry about sofa's and entertainment centers. On striking trend i remember is that a few two story homes had living room and kitchen up stairs and bedrooms down stairs.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




I've seen that in houses on tiny lots, especially in urban areas. Carport and a bedroom or bath downstairs, living room upstairs, more rooms on the third floor, and maybe a rooftop terrace.

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Magnus Praeda
Jul 18, 2003
The largess in the land.

some texas redneck posted:

Except Kenmore doesn't make anything at all (and they haven't in decades, if they ever did); the majority of their current lineup is made by Whirlpool and GE (Panasonic, Sanyo, LG, Bosch, and Electrolux also make appearances). They're usually identical or close to identical to the Whirlpool, GE, etc stuff.

Fair enough. They're still poo poo (my parents have had three Kenmore dryers in the past ten years). Admittedly, I think that might be that most major appliances are being made as cheaply as possible. They're hard and expensive to repair to such an extent that it's often cheaper just to get a whole new unit.

Pryor on Fire
May 14, 2013


Inherited a newish Kenmore front loader washer, can confirm it is utter poo poo. Already replaced two parts over a year of ownership and I am thinking I should give up on it despite it only being like 5 years old. If I do get a new one Speed Queen seems like the way to go.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I didn't mean to imply that Kenmore was some quality, just that they (mine) are easily and cheaply repaired. There probably isn't anything that can't be replaced with a screwdriver and pliers in about 15 minutes.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




#itshappening #hammertime #kawaiiandsugoi

EDIT: The dude on the bottom is holding something like an upside-down hammer. It's a heavy wooden sledge on a long pole that allows someone below to hammer down a beam from above.

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peanut fucked around with this message at 01:39 on Apr 25, 2016

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




4 hours later

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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




The roof is on and we're having a bbq with the carpenter dudes

EDIT: VVV 6 dudes plus a crane operator. All the beams came pre-cut and labeled so it was all wooden hammers and a few bolts.

peanut fucked around with this message at 08:34 on Apr 25, 2016

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


All that in one day!? How many workers were there?

Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


peanut posted:

EDIT: VVV 6 dudes plus a crane operator. All the beams came pre-cut and labeled so it was all wooden hammers and a few bolts.

This is seriously mind blowing to me. Does the subfloor just magically slot into place too, or does that get fasteners?

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Puzzle magic, then bolts.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Roofed.

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Pigsfeet on Rye
Oct 22, 2008

I'm meat on the hoof


Nap Ghost

peanut posted:

The roof is on and we're having a bbq with the carpenter dudes

EDIT: VVV 6 dudes plus a crane operator. All the beams came pre-cut and labeled so it was all wooden hammers and a few bolts.

The progress is amazing. Out of curiosity, what does one serve at a BBQ in Japan?

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Korean bbq (yakiniku), fried chicken, onigiri, some stir-fried vegetables and beer. But we got so much sake as gifts from neighbors. Please come drink it.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




X-ray view from future toilet

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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Windows come on Monday

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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Ceiling line

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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Window frames. Security grills are the current standard for bathroom windows, but I'm not sure why.

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Pigsfeet on Rye
Oct 22, 2008

I'm meat on the hoof


Nap Ghost

peanut posted:

Window frames. Security grills are the current standard for bathroom windows, but I'm not sure why.



Why are the windows different sizes and at different heights? Will one be in one room and one in another?

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Yes. The window in the corner is the shower, and the smaller window will be above the washer. I asked to make the shower window higher to line up, but the unit bath has some height restrictions.

Tim Thomas
Feb 12, 2008
breakdancin the night away

I find the way the bracing is done, as well as the lack of jack or cripple studs in favor of housed dados, to be really neat. It's like the 1940s never ended from a craftsmanship point of view.

stabbington
Sep 1, 2007

It doesn't feel right to kill an unarmed man... but I'll get over it.


Japan has been way into timber framing for thousands of years, no reason to quit now.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




There's one major company called Sekisui that does it like this. They made the cubic houses near mine.
https://youtu.be/Hx56wDkpr9s

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Zhentar
Sep 28, 2003

Brilliant Master Genius


Tim Thomas posted:

I find the way the bracing is done, as well as the lack of jack or cripple studs in favor of housed dados, to be really neat. It's like the 1940s never ended from a craftsmanship point of view.

Except that now, in true Japanese style, most of the craftsmanship is done by robots.

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