Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
POWELL CURES KIDS
Aug 26, 2016


This loving ruled. Massive step up from KotM, both as a whole and in Godzilla's characterization. I hated the previous focus there on Godzilla's ~relationship~ with humanity, and everything about needing him to "be the king" just smacked of insecurity. That was small dick energy. KotM's Godzilla is a Strong Good Lizard Daddy powered by the magic of love, or bombs, or something; in GvK he's a straight-up Angry God, comprehensible to a point, but also divine and ineffable, beyond human and beyond morality. A big part of that read comes from the otherwise throwaway choice of having it be Serizawa's kid who tries (and fails) to control MechaGodzilla. KotM had Serizawa as a priest, with his attempt to commune with Godzilla and be his "friend" ending in a fatal but noble sacrifice; this just plugs Serizawa Jr. into Ghidorah's brain and melts him, which is closing in on some Ark of the Covenant poo poo. It's awesome.

Martman posted:


I actually loved the callback to G'14 with Godzilla just absolutely wrecking the bridge in Hong Kong as opposed to making an effort to protect the Golden Gate Bridge in G'14... it conveyed to me that in the first movie he was really just doing business as usual. His job is to protect the world from assholes, but he still likes to avoid slaughtering people when it's easy... but Mechagodzilla disgusts (and maybe scares) him so much that he just goes ham immediately and does not have time to worry about casualties.


Yeah, I thought that was pretty cool too. The movie repeatedly makes it clear that Godzilla is loving pissed in a way we haven't seen before. He's not subtle that his behavior is divine wrath. I actually read him smashing the bridge as somewhat intentional, as something he went slightly out of his way to do. It probably would've been easier just to avoid, so there's communication in destroying it so casually, particularly since he's there sniffing around for MechaGodzilla. He's not being vindictive, or excessively punitive--he does it, in passing and with no real pageantry, specifically because it doesn't need to be some grand display of dominance over humanity. We don't rate that degree of consideration as a whole. But if we're gonna gently caress around and try to buy our way up to God, there's gonna be change left over when he comes to collect the bill.

Or, like you said, maybe he's just so worked up about McG that he doesn't care. Or, comedy option, maybe he's Kyle-Tier Pissed, and it's the equivalent of knocking over chairs and punching holes in the drywall. That's why I love a good kaiju movie. They force us to interpret the characters and their motivations as (at least partially) a product of communication, instead of exclusively vice versa. It automatically puts us in dialogue with the film. And, more importantly, I also like it when big monsters hit each other in the loving face.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

POWELL CURES KIDS
Aug 26, 2016


Clarity question: At least one of the Ghidorah skulls actually remains intact, yes? There's a throwaway line that Serizawa Jr. is able to pilot McG because the skull he's in is being used as a telepathic link to another one inside the robot. Kong rips off McG's head, and although we don't see him spike it into the ground and stomp on it, it's probably a safe enough 70/30 bet to assume the skull inside is destroyed. But that still leaves us with the one in Apex HQ. I would have less than no problem with "satanic space dragon ghost" being revisited in hypothetical future sequels; there's a shitload of untapped potential there, and I've been dying to see more horror-oriented material in a kaiju flick since Cloverfield.

I'll be honest and say that I was high as gently caress when I watched this. Might give it another go with my head screwed back on over the weekend.

POWELL CURES KIDS
Aug 26, 2016


It's been a while since I've seen it, but Godzilla 2014 rules, and I still consider it the best of the Legendary films. Cranston is incredibly good in it, but his death is the keystone of the entire story, and the movie works so well precisely because it moves on from him. The whole thing is about dealing with trauma, broken families, nuclear legacy, "the sins of the father"; Cranston abruptly and unexpectedly croaking it works those themes from every direction, and it's emotionally compelling to boot. His palpable absence is a feature, not a bug. The film is way stronger because of it.

POWELL CURES KIDS
Aug 26, 2016


Ford is reserved and quiet as a direct and intentional response to Cranston's expressive, superlative anger. You can read the nuance and the history pretty clearly. Cranston becoming increasingly erratic and even more distant over his guilt for sending his wife into the reactor, Ford being driven instead into intense repression as a reaction to his father's toxic coping mechanisms, both characters' isolation and alienation feeding into the other's. Ford's lifelong attempt to "not be like Dad" and move on from their shared trauma led him to embrace Duty instead of personal obsession, but he very notably went for EOD, and he's very notably cut off from his own family, because, just like his father, he never successfully dealt with the issue. He just buried it, aggressively and deliberately over-corrected, and then ended up in the same place regardless. Cranston lives in the past, which is why Ford refuses to even (consciously) acknowledge it until literally forced to by giant monsters, at which point he's confronted with the exact same choice Cranston faced in the reactor: choosing the greater good over the personal.

Cranston turning out to be right doesn't change the fact that he's pathological. His obsession with "unraveling the conspiracy" absolutely has more to do with his intense guilt than any actual certitude that something wicked is afoot. Cranston even plays him as kind of surprised that there's something going on after all. Ford's character, and ATJ's performance, are directly informed by their relationship, and Ford's ambivalent feelings about his father's legacy--Cranston turning out to be both crazy and right, their reconciliation coming about through a re-enactment of his mother's death, in the same place, Cranston only realizing the actual value of family at the exact moment Ford has to grapple with his failures--drive that inner conflict, because he's attempting to resolve some fairly compelling contradictions. That's his arc, and it's an interesting one backed by a solid performance. It's just that you have to actually engage with the character instead of waiting for blunt force exposition about his motivations. That's not a block of wood. That's a very well-written protagonist dealing with the fundamental themes of the film. Which is also why the MUTOs are a corrupt mating pair whose destructive habits of communication and perverse approach to the family unit are the antagonists. Ford's inability to talk to the parents of the kid he saved on the train is also worth looking at.

ATJ is (correctly) playing Ford as a character in a family drama, not an action movie. The character is thoughtful and subdued, but it's not some "stoic high-testosterone OORAH MARINES" thing, it's because he's a deeply conflicted, fundamentally sensitive person. Finding him flat isn't a fault of the writing or the performance, which are both excellent; it's a failure to do a basic reading of the film.

Also, his name is dope.

POWELL CURES KIDS
Aug 26, 2016


feedmyleg posted:

Passion projects take time. Mockbusters do not have the luxury of time.

"Here's ten thousand dollars and the address of my nephew Mark's cardboard box factory. Have the movie on my desk by Wednesday."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply