Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«464 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Buff Skeleton
Oct 24, 2005



Paul MaudDib posted:

here you go. I dunno about "solid" though, it's getting to be a pretty niche feature and most of the boards you'll find it on are cheap/crappy. Out of those three I'd probably say the HD3P is the least-crappy looking one.

Maybe at some point think about getting a USB DAC/amp combo unit or a USB audio interface (if you need a mic).

Oh nice, thanks! I'd looked at that MSI board on Amazon, but maybe missed the specific version with a PCI slot since there's like a dozen variants over there. But this could well solve my problems perfectly

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


Buff Skeleton posted:

Oh nice, thanks! I'd looked at that MSI board on Amazon, but maybe missed the specific version with a PCI slot since there's like a dozen variants over there. But this could well solve my problems perfectly

I can tell you that my MSI Z97 PC Mate was one of the shittiest boards I've owned, and I think the "PC Pro" might be the modernized version of that. It had really bad noise on the onboard audio (which, granted, you won't be using) and was not feature-rich. In particular the Gigabyte HD3P is the only one there with Type-C.

Buff Skeleton
Oct 24, 2005



Paul MaudDib posted:

I can tell you that my MSI Z97 PC Mate was one of the shittiest boards I've owned, and I think the "PC Pro" might be the modernized version of that. It had really bad noise on the onboard audio (which, granted, you won't be using) and was not feature-rich. In particular the Gigabyte HD3P is the only one there with Type-C.

Huh, maybe it varies between generations? I have a MSI MS-7673 right now that's been very solid, and way before that I had an ASUS P5N-E that never failed either. I think I had a Gigabyte board at some point as well that was well-behaved.

That said, if it seems like all three choices are kinda meh, where the Gigabyte is merely the least-meh, I think I'd rather spring for a better board and a new sound card rather than chance things just to get an ancient PCI slot in there.

Looks like there are plenty of PCIe Xonar successors available too, so I might just get one of those. What are some good, solid motherboards for an i7-8700k that should hold up for years?

Buff Skeleton fucked around with this message at May 18, 2018 around 01:36

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


Buff Skeleton posted:

Huh, maybe it varies between generations? I have a MSI MS-7673 right now that's been very solid, and way before that I had an ASUS P5N-E that never failed either. I think I had a Gigabyte board at some point as well that was well-behaved.

That said, if it seems like all three choices are kinda meh, where the Gigabyte is merely the least-meh, I think I'd rather spring for a better board and a new sound card rather than chance things just to get an ancient PCI slot in there.

Looks like there are plenty of PCIe Xonar successors available too, so I might just get one of those. What are some good, solid motherboards for an i7-8700k that should hold up for years?

It's more that this tier of motherboards (or at least the one I had - it was a $70 mobo) are cheap/bad, that one looks like a pretty nice one for its era (eg 48-bit 192 KHz onboard audio). They run OK, it's just they tend to have less features (mostly), slightly lower core/RAM overclocks, etc. The one I used had really bad noise on the onboard audio.

Here's a list of Z370 motherboards with the best VRMs. Don't take this too seriously, anything past "midrange" ("180W power, 336 hour AVX uptime") is completely excessive for anyone who's not doing LN2 or something, you definitely should not drop from a 8700K (say) to an 8600K to buy a better motherboard, if that's your budget. We're maybe talking 200 MHz difference between "great" and "poo poo tier", it will not make or break you. But if you intend to hold onto it for 5+ years then the difference between a poo poo-tier $125 and a midrange $200 motherboard may not be as significant, and they will probably wear better due to better caps/better heatsinks/etc. VRMs and caps do not like to be hot, a 20C difference in temps can translate into a >4x difference in runtime.



Again, bear in mind that most people are using USB DAC/amps and interfaces (or Firewire, particularly interfaces) now. Internal cards are getting to be a niche. Inside the PC case, there's a lot more RF noise that needs to be shielded (or maybe not, in which case you may not be getting the quality you think you are).

The other thing to bear in mind is... 8-core Coffee Lake is probably coming late this year, and nobody knows whether they're going to work on Z370. I think yes, but nobody knows. Next year AMD is also launching 7nm CPUs that will likely clock as high as Coffee Lake and also have up to 12 cores, while probably hitting a similar power target as the 8C Coffee Lakes. If you aren't literally dying for hardware, it may be a better decision to wait a year to build. Maybe consider that an incentive to go with that PCIe card or a USB DAC/amp or interface instead? Good audio hardware is not getting 25% cheaper year-on-year at the moment.

(and fwiw I feel you on this becoming a niche feature... I have a SCSI card for my scanner that needs PCI non-express and I'm trying to figure out what to do since most of my PCs don't support that anymore. But I understand the decision on board partners' part here - my gaming rig only has PCIe nowadays and that's OK, and Z370 is a gaming chipset first and foremost. The picture is a bit better in the non-OC chipsets, a lot more of them have PCI non-E support for at least one slot, and that probably satisfies most of the people who need PCI non-E capability.)

Paul MaudDib fucked around with this message at May 18, 2018 around 02:44

OtherworldlyInvader
Feb 10, 2005

The X-COM project did not deliver the universe's ultimate cup of coffee. You have failed to save the Earth.




Buff Skeleton posted:

Do they still make motherboards with regular-rear end PCI slots, or is it exclusively PCIe now?

I'm thinking of upgrading my aging i5-2500k processor, which of course means new motherboard and RAM as well, but I also have an Asus Xonar DG PCI sound card I'd rather not replace if I can avoid it. I've had bad experiences with onboard sound with every motherboard I've ever tried (my speakers pick up interference from the board, even with quality boards), so I would be hesitant to ditch a discrete sound card entirely. That and getting audio drivers working perfectly on any Windows OS (even 7) can be delicate work.

If I were to jump to an i7-8700k or something, is it even possible to find a solid motherboard with a PCI slot these days? If not, are there any decent discrete sound cards that are known to work well with Windows 7, but aren't stupidly overpriced like Creative cards?

Sounds like you might have already figured this out, but you can buy a PCIe Asus Xonar DGX for $40: https://www.amazon.com/Xonar-DGX-GX.../dp/B007TMZ1BK/

Fuzzie Dunlop
Apr 14, 2013


Are there going to be significant Memorial Day sales? At this point does it make sense to wait a week or so?

Ema Nymton
Apr 26, 2008

the place where I come from
is a small town


Buglord

Hello folks, I want to use the Windows 10 Game Bar to record games, but my video card doesn't support it (meanwhile, my cheap refurb laptop can). So I'm looking to replace my 5-year-old GeForce GT 630. I'm in the USA, and I play PC games, but nothing strenuous since I usually only buy games on Steam sales. I don't want to spend more than $200. My main monitor is 1080p with a second at 720p.

But look at this minefield of cards that don't support NVidia NVENC or AMD VCE. It's saying, "This series onward work, except for these, but some might? vv "
https://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox...ts-for-game-dvr

Shopping on newegg and eBay is a pain because I'm constantly having to check back to this list. Is there a simpler way to find and compare GFX cards that support Game DVR? I think it has to be PCI-E 2.0 to work in my motherboard.

Arivia
Mar 17, 2011



Ema Nymton posted:

Hello folks, I want to use the Windows 10 Game Bar to record games, but my video card doesn't support it (meanwhile, my cheap refurb laptop can). So I'm looking to replace my 5-year-old GeForce GT 630. I'm in the USA, and I play PC games, but nothing strenuous since I usually only buy games on Steam sales. I don't want to spend more than $200. My main monitor is 1080p with a second at 720p.

But look at this minefield of cards that don't support NVidia NVENC or AMD VCE. It's saying, "This series onward work, except for these, but some might? vv "
https://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox...ts-for-game-dvr

Shopping on newegg and eBay is a pain because I'm constantly having to check back to this list. Is there a simpler way to find and compare GFX cards that support Game DVR? I think it has to be PCI-E 2.0 to work in my motherboard.

It's 600 or later for Nvidia. We're now on 1000-series. Anything you get new should be fine. Here's a good 1050ti for under $200 on Newegg that will fit in your case and work with whatever you have. https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...N82E16814137056

e: and PCI-E 3.0 will be backwards compatible with a 2.0 motherboard. It'll be slightly slower speed, but a 1050ti isn't going to saturate a x16 link anyway.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


Not all NVIDIA cards have the NVENC block onboard though - the GT 1030 doesn't, and I would suspect the GT cards in the 600/700 might not have it as well. Probably GTX-only for the encoding support.

As a heuristic, I'd say "if it's 600-series or newer, AND a desktop-level GTX chip (some of which end up in laptops) then it will support NVENC" but things are pretty muddy if you go back to the Kepler days when the lineups were a lot less straightforward (particularly in the OEM/laptop segments).

I'd echo the recommendation for a 1050 Ti or a 1050 (these do have the encoder).

Paul MaudDib fucked around with this message at May 19, 2018 around 03:01

Ema Nymton
Apr 26, 2008

the place where I come from
is a small town


Buglord

Thanks for the help I will consider buying that card once I open my case and confirm it has enough slots and clearance for it.

My current card is a 600 series, but happens to be one of the models that may or may not do recording (in my case not).

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

I'm pretty sure they could find a way to put a 1050 on a thumbdrive if they really wanted to. It'd be a really funny-looking thumbdrive, but hey.

All snark aside, if your case can't fit even one of the low-profile 1050/1050Ti cards, I think we'd all be curious to see that case. I think there are even a few low-profile passively-cooled ones, too.

Arivia
Mar 17, 2011



BIG HEADLINE posted:

I'm pretty sure they could find a way to put a 1050 on a thumbdrive if they really wanted to. It'd be a really funny-looking thumbdrive, but hey.

All snark aside, if your case can't fit even one of the low-profile 1050/1050Ti cards, I think we'd all be curious to see that case. I think there are even a few low-profile passively-cooled ones, too.

The one I linked is a two-slot. Could be an ITX pc jammed full of must have old Sound Blasters and idk an IDE card. We have seen enough people with weird systems yelling about how they can’t do the same as always for me to ever rule anything out.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


Ema Nymton posted:

Thanks for the help I will consider buying that card once I open my case and confirm it has enough slots and clearance for it.

My current card is a 600 series, but happens to be one of the models that may or may not do recording (in my case not).

Yeah, again, the low end of the lineup used to be a shitshow. Some of those models shipped on up to 4 different types of silicon with as many as 9 different configurations once you take RAM into account. And wait till you see what a shitshow mobile GPUs used to be (and still are, somewhat).

The older Fermi models that NVIDIA shoehorned into the 600/700 lineup won't support NVENC, that was a Kepler feature. Some of the GT### models on earlier Kepler silicon might not support it either, dunno.

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

So some news for people who don't read PC trade sites regularly: the 1180 should be out in Founder's Edition form in July, with the custom cards due in August/September. The only news is about the 1180, which suggests that nVidia is going for a tiered release again - expect the 1170 to come out 1-2 months later. No pricing information has been released, and everyone who lists one is talking out their asses as that'd be heavily NDAed because depending on crypto it's certainly subject to change.

Similarly, and I would certainly wait until we get confirmation, if the cards *do* release in July, and nVidia licenses Founder's Editions to EVGA, buying a card preferably at the end of June/early July would place you healthily within the Step Up window for both the Founder's Editions *and* the base model custom-build card (remember Step Up doesn't apply to the high-OC/premium SKUs). EVGA can take their sweet time upgrading you, but once you're in the queue, you're golden.

Now we all just have to wait for Computex for the formal announcement, and hopefully Intel will dish more info about the Z390 and octacores. The Z390 might have more life in it than I originally expected - Intel is having tons of problems with moving to a 10nm process, which means Ice Lake (the next consumer-level architecture) is probably going to be a 2020 part.

It's probably going to be a very Computex for AMD, except for the Radeon group.

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


That's just as speculative as the GTC release was, and I'm super burned out on GPU speculation at this point.

Frankly I think NVIDIA is probably not going to release 12nm cards, they wouldn't be on the market long at all before AMD released on 7nm. It's just a question of when NVIDIA considers 7nm to be ready. Technically 7nm is already in volume production, as is GDDR6 - meaning we potentially should be seeing/should already have seen the release. There is no real substantial point where NVIDIA would definitely release over the next year, it's just whenever they feel like it.

I wouldn't be surprised by a July soft-launch and Aug/Sep hard-launch but there is no evidence either will happen.

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

Paul MaudDib posted:

That's just as speculative as the GTC release was, and I'm super burned out on GPU speculation at this point.

Frankly I think NVIDIA is probably not going to release 12nm cards, they wouldn't be on the market long at all before AMD released on 7nm. It's just a question of when NVIDIA considers 7nm to be ready. Technically 7nm is already in volume production, as is GDDR6 - meaning we potentially should be seeing/should already have seen the release. There is no real substantial point where NVIDIA would definitely release over the next year, it's just whenever they feel like it.

I wouldn't be surprised by a July soft-launch and Aug/Sep hard-launch but there is no evidence either will happen.

Right, hence my saying to wait for Computex, where hopefully hard info will finally replace "now don't tell anyone, but" rumor mongering.

If nVidia stays mum in Taipei, we'll know.

Coca Koala
Nov 28, 2005

ongoing nowhere


College Slice

Sanity check on this? I'm building a linux desktop to gently caress out with various programming environments, plus some web browsing and slack/discord.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor
Motherboard: ASRock - Z370M-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory
Case: Cooler Master - Elite 130 Mini ITX Tower Case
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply

I don't know if the ddr4 is worth it, but it's not too much more. I'm going with 16 gigs of ram over 8 because I don't want to have to worry about how much ram slack has chewed up or how many tabs I have open. The case is one that I already have, so I'd prefer to stick with that one if possible. I suspect the power supply is overkill, but I've gotten burned before by buying a power supply that was close to the lower limit for what I needed, so I went with something way more beefy than what I thought I needed this time around.

I have no strong feelings on the cpu or the motherboard, I just picked the performance/no oc cpu from the OP and a motherboard with the right socket.

TheFluff
Dec 13, 2006

LISTEN TO ME
I AM A SEAGULL
OF WEALTH AND TASTE


Grimey Drawer

e: nvm I'm dumb

Instant Grat
Jul 31, 2009

Just add
NERD RAAAAAAGE


Grimey Drawer

Sanity check? Trying to help an Aus-based friend with a rig for video editing and 1080p-ish gaming. It has to be mobile - ideally with a form-factor that goes well in a suitcase, which is why I picked out this case (it also has a handle - again, good for transport).

CPU: Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7GHz 6-Core Processor ($498.00 @ Shopping Express)
CPU Cooler: Scythe - BIG Shuriken 2 Rev. B 45.5 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($98.00 @ Amazon Australia)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z370M-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard ($189.00 @ IJK)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($239.00 @ Umart)
Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($109.00 @ Shopping Express)
Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB Mini Video Card ($419.00 @ Scorptec)
Case: Silverstone - ML08B-H HTPC Case ($95.00 @ Umart)
Power Supply: Silverstone - Strider Gold 450W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular SFX Power Supply ($109.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Total: $1756.00

I'm considering advising them to step down to the non-K 8700, since they probably won't be doing any overclocking - will the Turbo Boost basically raise itself to match a non-overclocked K-chip? Also, I'm not an idiot and that CPU cooler will totally fit in that case, right?

E: I haven't asked, but I'm assuming they're planning to have all the bighuge video files on external drives.

Instant Grat fucked around with this message at May 20, 2018 around 20:40

Throc Mortin
Oct 15, 2006


Hi all,

I'm currently thinking about updating my current machine (https://pcpartpicker.com/list/LPBsLJ). My PSU/case are 8+ years old, and my USB ports on my case are starting to die.

Primarily, I'm looking to game with this machine: 4-6 EVE clients simultaneously, Star Citizen, and VR in late 2018/early 2019

Is it worth upgrading now, or am I better off waiting until I'm ready to actually purchase a VR kit? If it is upgrading now, is it worth doing anything other than new case/PSU/windows 10?

Thanks!

Arivia
Mar 17, 2011



Throc Mortin posted:

Hi all,

I'm currently thinking about updating my current machine (https://pcpartpicker.com/list/LPBsLJ). My PSU/case are 8+ years old, and my USB ports on my case are starting to die.

Primarily, I'm looking to game with this machine: 4-6 EVE clients simultaneously, Star Citizen, and VR in late 2018/early 2019

Is it worth upgrading now, or am I better off waiting until I'm ready to actually purchase a VR kit? If it is upgrading now, is it worth doing anything other than new case/PSU/windows 10?

Thanks!

If you buy an Intel Optane drive you get a free jpeg with your next serving of Crobbers’ cock.

Arivia fucked around with this message at May 21, 2018 around 05:57

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

Throc Mortin posted:

Hi all,

I'm currently thinking about updating my current machine (https://pcpartpicker.com/list/LPBsLJ). My PSU/case are 8+ years old, and my USB ports on my case are starting to die.

Primarily, I'm looking to game with this machine: 4-6 EVE clients simultaneously, Star Citizen, and VR in late 2018/early 2019

Is it worth upgrading now, or am I better off waiting until I'm ready to actually purchase a VR kit? If it is upgrading now, is it worth doing anything other than new case/PSU/windows 10?

Thanks!

Wait another 2-4 weeks. Computex 2018 kicks off on the 5th of June and runs until the 9th, and there'll likely be a fair number of NDAs lifted then. For starters, one thing Intel's expected to announce is an "Anniversary Edition" of the i7-8700K in the form of the i7-8086K, which is just an 8700K with a stock 4Ghz clock and 5Ghz turbo clock. That might send the 8700K a bit lower in pricing, but it's already been pretty damned low ($299 or lower in some cases with promo codes/bundle discounts). We'll also (hopefully) get more information on when to expect the octacores and Z390.

To my knowledge, EVE is still a 32-bit application, but they're 'working on' 64-bit. The client alone also only uses one core (plus resources for the audio no one listens to), but I *believe* there's a way through Windows to force different instances to use different cores, which makes a six-core CPU advantageous. I also can't in good conscience (since you're running 32GB of DDR3) recommend more than a 2x8GB kit of DDR4-3000 or -3200, because the prices for high-density RAM are still astronomically high - seriously, some kits cost as much as a 1070 itself. 2x8 kits are slowly getting back down to pre-bubble pricing, but they've still got about $30-50 to go, and 4x8 will still run you ~$300-350.

On the GPU front, again, it's a matter of what nVidia decides to announce at Computex. The sheer fact that no one knows - or will say definitively - how much frame buffer will be on the 1180 (and no one will officially *say* that it'll be called the 1180 yet) means that nVidia's got a pretty decent NDA in place. One of the safest plays would be to pick up an EVGA 1060 or 1070 at/around their MSRP and use it as a placeholder card to use in the Step Up program. nVidia's (supposedly) going to be doing a tiered release of their new GPUs - putting out the x80 part first, and following it up with the x70 "later." Rumors have the MSRP of the x80 part at $699, but no site will confirm this, and I'm sure nVidia is even unsure of the MSRP and is hoping beyond all hopes that something happens to reinflate the crypto bubble (despite Ethereum ASICs coming out that are vastly more efficient than GPU mining). If history serves as any judge, the x80 part will be about 15-20% faster than the current Titan Xp, and the x70 part will be on par with the TXp performance-wise.

And even though it was a joke post, *don't* consider Optane. It shows great promise as an NVMe alternative/successor, but it's just *way* too expensive at this point.

BIG HEADLINE fucked around with this message at May 21, 2018 around 07:40

jaffathegreat
Mar 1, 2009


What country are you in? Australia
What are you using the system for? Gaming.
What's your budget? <AUD$1500 (supplying own keyboard, mouse, and monitor)
If you’re doing professional work...? N/A
If you're gaming, what is your monitor resolution? How fancy do you want your graphics, from “it runs” to “Ultra preset as fast as possible”? 1920 x 1080 - Ultra preset as fast as possible.

Pc Partpicker: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/F6Z4sZ
Umart: https://www.umart.com.au/Umart-IEM-...-PC_43395G.html

Umart is offering a computer which I copied (more-or-less) in that PC Partpicker link. I haven't bought a computer in 6 years and I'm worried about over-spending (Aussie Dollar ). Given that I want to be able to play Dark Souls 3, Doom, and other graphically intense games on full settings, is this rig appropriate? I also want to get a Steam link to connect to my TV so I hope this will work for that as well. I'd also like to keep my options open for maybe getting VR down the track.

I also think that 500g SSD is not going to be nearly enough storage given how many Steam games I plan on downloading. Should I get one large SSD or two smaller ones?

I'd like to remove some of the flashier items too. I have no case preferences but I'd prefer the cleanest, simplest (sans LEDs) and smallest machine possible.

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

jaffathegreat posted:

What country are you in? Australia
What are you using the system for? Gaming.
What's your budget? <AUD$1500 (supplying own keyboard, mouse, and monitor)
If you’re doing professional work...? N/A
If you're gaming, what is your monitor resolution? How fancy do you want your graphics, from “it runs” to “Ultra preset as fast as possible”? 1920 x 1080 - Ultra preset as fast as possible.

Pc Partpicker: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/F6Z4sZ
Umart: https://www.umart.com.au/Umart-IEM-...-PC_43395G.html

Umart is offering a computer which I copied (more-or-less) in that PC Partpicker link. I haven't bought a computer in 6 years and I'm worried about over-spending (Aussie Dollar ). Given that I want to be able to play Dark Souls 3, Doom, and other graphically intense games on full settings, is this rig appropriate? I also want to get a Steam link to connect to my TV so I hope this will work for that as well. I'd also like to keep my options open for maybe getting VR down the track.

I also think that 500g SSD is not going to be nearly enough storage given how many Steam games I plan on downloading. Should I get one large SSD or two smaller ones?

I'd like to remove some of the flashier items too. I have no case preferences but I'd prefer the cleanest, simplest (sans LEDs) and smallest machine possible.

A preliminary edit: https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/fvxLsZ

Obviously this is more than your quoted budget, but you can get back down to your budget (almost $1500AUD on the nose) by dropping down to a 500GB MX500. You can get *under* $1500AUD by going with an H370 motherboard and DDR4-2666 RAM. You lose the ability to use higher-clocked RAM with a locked chip (which costs you a bit of performance), but originally you had DDR4-2133 on a Z370, so no biggie. There are also a huge lack of options in the H370 mATX space. You can already save yourself some money by dropping the AIO unit - the stock cooler is perfectly fine for the locked chips and an AIO would be overkill.

If you want the smallest case possible, obviously ITX is an option, but to make your budget you'd probably have to make more concessions. Here's an H370 ITX build with 16GB of 2666 that *just barely* overshoots $1500AUD: https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/3PqLsZ

Z370 ITX build (16GB of DDR4-3000 brings the price to $1600AUD, so I stuck with 2x4GB in this edit): https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/yJ9qmq

There *are* slightly cheaper ITX cases than the 250D, but the 250D is pretty easy to work with and is decidedly *not* 'flashy.'

EDIT: I can see you don't have a new PSU in your original link, which I'm taking to mean that you intended to re-use your Corsair VS 550W. If that PSU is 6+ years old like your current system, I/we would strongly advise you replace it.

BIG HEADLINE fucked around with this message at May 21, 2018 around 11:00

jaffathegreat
Mar 1, 2009


BIG HEADLINE posted:

A preliminary edit: https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/fvxLsZ

Obviously this is more than your quoted budget, but you can get back down to your budget (almost $1500AUD on the nose) by dropping down to a 500GB MX500. You can get *under* $1500AUD by going with an H370 motherboard and DDR4-2666 RAM. You lose the ability to use higher-clocked RAM with a locked chip (which costs you a bit of performance), but originally you had DDR4-2133 on a Z370, so no biggie. There are also a huge lack of options in the H370 mATX space. You can already save yourself some money by dropping the AIO unit - the stock cooler is perfectly fine for the locked chips and an AIO would be overkill.

If you want the smallest case possible, obviously ITX is an option, but to make your budget you'd probably have to make more concessions. Here's an H370 ITX build with 16GB of 2666 that *just barely* overshoots $1500AUD: https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/3PqLsZ

Z370 ITX build (16GB of DDR4-3000 brings the price to $1600AUD, so I stuck with 2x4GB in this edit): https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/yJ9qmq

There *are* slightly cheaper ITX cases than the 250D, but the 250D is pretty easy to work with and is decidedly *not* 'flashy.'

EDIT: I can see you don't have a new PSU in your original link, which I'm taking to mean that you intended to re-use your Corsair VS 550W. If that PSU is 6+ years old like your current system, I/we would strongly advise you replace it.

Thanks for the great advice. I'll stash away a bit more cash for a few weeks as I like the options you get at the $1600ish price range.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

jaffathegreat posted:

Thanks for the great advice. I'll stash away a bit more cash for a few weeks as I like the options you get at the $1600ish price range.

Yeah, getting 2x8 is more worthwhile on the ITX build since those boards lack four DIMM slots. And seriously - don't even *bother* looking up what 2x16GB of DDR4-3000 costs at the moment.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«464 »