Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«11 »
  • Post
  • Reply
The Bananana
May 21, 2008

This is a metaphor, a Christian allegory. The fact that I have to explain to you that Jesus is the Warthog, and the Banana is drepanocytosis is just embarrassing for you.




Your posts convinced me to make some sugar cookies.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

I need help again, cookie sages. I tried my hand at this recipe for pb choc chip cookies and they turned out... crumbly? They basically disintegrated in my mouth instead of having the chewy bite that I wanted. I did bake them longer than the instructions called for because they were in no way done after 10 minutes. Did I overdo the baking time, or was there something recipe wise I could have done to fix things?

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



I think it's a mess up on their part in the printing of the recipe. It doesn't appear to have any eggs listed in the ingredients list.
E:Read it again it mentions one egg but that doesn't seem like a lot to me. Try adding another one and see?
Also peanut butter affects the texture of pb cookies a lot.
The all natural ones seem to not work so well gotta use JIF or Skippy.

Thumposaurus fucked around with this message at Oct 6, 2016 around 17:24

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

I haven't tried the peanut butter cookies again but I'm back with another question. How well do cookie recipes double? Is it just a matter of keeping the ratios or would it just be better to make two batches?

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006

Can I say "shit" around the baby?


Grimey Drawer

Follow up question, has anyone tried to make croissant-cookies? This sounds dumb but I'm coming up with an idea for a thing...

Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


AnonSpore posted:

I haven't tried the peanut butter cookies again but I'm back with another question. How well do cookie recipes double? Is it just a matter of keeping the ratios or would it just be better to make two batches?

Unless you're making something unusually finicky, yep, it's just a matter of keeping the ratios. Double your ingredients, bam, double the cookie dough. Or halve, or triple...

Keep in mind of course that your bowls and mixer have to be able to keep up with your scaling—if you have smallish bowls or you're using a hand mixer (or the recipe makes a large yield to begin with), you may find you're better off batching it. But even then you can still save time by measuring out the ingredients for your second batch while you're measuring out the ingredients for your first.

Olive!
Mar 16, 2015

It's not a ghost, but probably a 'living corpse'. The 'living dead' with a hell of a lot of bloodlust...


RandomPauI posted:

Follow up question, has anyone tried to make croissant-cookies? This sounds dumb but I'm coming up with an idea for a thing...

You mean like... palmiers?

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006

Can I say "shit" around the baby?


Grimey Drawer

Olive Garden tonight! posted:

You mean like... palmiers?

I didn't think the two were related but that makes sense.

The Bananana
May 21, 2008

This is a metaphor, a Christian allegory. The fact that I have to explain to you that Jesus is the Warthog, and the Banana is drepanocytosis is just embarrassing for you.




RandomPauI posted:

I didn't think the two were related but that makes sense.

Just go ahead and take credit for having invented palmiers

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



I fuckin love cookies! I'm interested in trying to make French Macaroons for the first time but I could use some tips. I've seen it's recommended to use a Convection oven, is that a deal breaker or just a recommendation?
I'm going to have to pick up equipment to make them, so in the meanwhile, are there any good recommended kitchen scales I should pick up? Because I have literally no scales right now.

Aside from that stuff, I've seen a handful of different recipes online, anyone have a particular recommendation to start with? In terms of flavoring I think I'd probably like to start with either Lavender or Pistachio. Some place in town also makes these awesome Coconut Rum flavored ones which I would mind attempting to replicate too...

Normally I just wing this kind of stuff but these sound like they're a bit delicate to work with.

cocoavalley
Dec 28, 2010

Well son, a funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done

Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

I fuckin love cookies! I'm interested in trying to make French Macaroons for the first time but I could use some tips. I've seen it's recommended to use a Convection oven, is that a deal breaker or just a recommendation?
I'm going to have to pick up equipment to make them, so in the meanwhile, are there any good recommended kitchen scales I should pick up? Because I have literally no scales right now.

Aside from that stuff, I've seen a handful of different recipes online, anyone have a particular recommendation to start with? In terms of flavoring I think I'd probably like to start with either Lavender or Pistachio. Some place in town also makes these awesome Coconut Rum flavored ones which I would mind attempting to replicate too...

Normally I just wing this kind of stuff but these sound like they're a bit delicate to work with.

I've made them a bunch of times in a regular oven and had a lot of luck with BraveTart 's recipe, which is pretty no-nonsense. It doesn't require aging your egg whites and uses French meringue technique. It's not bulletproof, but even if they come out wonky, they still taste good. Also, parchment paper is fine if you don't have silpats already. I actually think my macarons form better feet with parchment.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



That's pretty much perfect thanks, found a lot of good info on that blog in general actually.

Since I'm lacking the equipment for them for the time being, I made some Chewy Amaretti Cookie Sandwiches instead, filled with chocolate ganache. There are no pictures because people came over and destroyed them instantly


For the next target I'm debating between some Crunchy Peanut Butter Buckeyes, or those Chocolate Chip Oatmeal cookies posted up in this thread.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Friends, goons, countrymen, I need a good rear end recipe for white chocolate macadamia nut cookies, shooting for a similar cookiefeel as the SE chocolate chip ones. I don't have enough cookiesperience to know if just subbing in ingredients would be enough.

cocoavalley
Dec 28, 2010

Well son, a funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done

Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

That's pretty much perfect thanks, found a lot of good info on that blog in general actually.

Yeah, I only discovered that BraveTart contributes to Serious Eats after finding her macaron recipe. Shouldn't be surprised!

Haven't made them since before changing apartments and decided it was time to test my oven. I did 1 or 2 turns too many with the batter, so they spread out more than I would have liked. Honestly, I'm still experimenting, but I get consistent edible results from this recipe at least.


They ran into each other a bit and didn't rise as much, but the sheen and chewy texture are just right.


(The filling squished when I cut it, so it looks like there's more in there than there actually is)

I personally prefer fillings that offset the sweetness of the shells, so I usually go for bitter ganache. Citrus curd is nice too, and buttercream that has lots of tart fruit powder mixed in. I wish I could figure out a non-ganache filling that didn't need so much sugar ... though maybe mascarpone or whipped cream cheese would work?

CrazySalamander
Nov 5, 2009


Everyone uses mascarpone as a dessert cheese. Be brave, try chocolate+bleu cheese! In all seriousness, that actually is supposed to be pretty good. http://www.chowhound.com/food-news/...-and-chocolate/

cocoavalley
Dec 28, 2010

Well son, a funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done

CrazySalamander posted:

Everyone uses mascarpone as a dessert cheese. Be brave, try chocolate+bleu cheese! In all seriousness, that actually is supposed to be pretty good. http://www.chowhound.com/food-news/...-and-chocolate/

I loving love stinkyblue cheese, this sounds like a plan! Chocolate shells and blue cheese filling.... or fruit shells. Thanks for the idea!

Vixenella
Mar 23, 2009


Can I make shortbread and gingerbread dough now and then freeze it until mid December and then bake it? My recipes for both call for chilling the dough so I'm wondering if freezing would ruin the dough.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Really though guys I want to make white chocolate macadamia cookies!!!

cocoavalley
Dec 28, 2010

Well son, a funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done

AnonSpore posted:

Really though guys I want to make white chocolate macadamia cookies!!!

I don't have a recommended recipe, but IME chocolate chip cookie recipes are pretty forgiving as far as swapping additions/optional ingredients. Just keep in mind that white chocolate is a lot sweeter than dark, so if your favorite recipe has really sweet base cookie, maybe try to counter that by using salted mac nuts?

Tried a blue cheese filling in a few chocolate macarons using cream cheese as a 'carrier'. It's certainly interesting - the cheese funk sort of reveals itself only after the initial chocolate intensity subsides so they don't really complement as much as compete. I guess it makes sense since they are both earthy flavors ... I still want to try it with fruit shells, though.

shame on an IGA
Apr 8, 2005

get into shit let it out like diarrhea
got burnt once that was only gonorrhea


Alton brown's Chocolate Chip Cookie #10 has been my go to base dough for a decade.

Yes I melt the butter instead of creaming. Deal with it.

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

shame on an IGA posted:

Alton brown's Chocolate Chip Cookie #10 has been my go to base dough for a decade.

Yes I melt the butter instead of creaming. Deal with it.

I use his ingredient ratio but Keller's method, inasmuch as I use use chilled butter cut into cubes. Put one stick in, let the mixer beat it until its almost smooth, dump the next one in and once almost smooth add the sugars slowly. This gives the added benefit of having somewhat chilled dough when you've put it altogether, speeding the time from making dough and getting the first batch of cookies into my mouth.

CrazySalamander
Nov 5, 2009


cocoavalley posted:

I don't have a recommended recipe, but IME chocolate chip cookie recipes are pretty forgiving as far as swapping additions/optional ingredients. Just keep in mind that white chocolate is a lot sweeter than dark, so if your favorite recipe has really sweet base cookie, maybe try to counter that by using salted mac nuts?

Tried a blue cheese filling in a few chocolate macarons using cream cheese as a 'carrier'. It's certainly interesting - the cheese funk sort of reveals itself only after the initial chocolate intensity subsides so they don't really complement as much as compete. I guess it makes sense since they are both earthy flavors ... I still want to try it with fruit shells, though.

Looking at rogue creamery it looks like they mix the bleu cheese with some cocoa powder (and probably other stuff) presumably to avoid the problem you're talking about. That being said, macarons aren't really famed for their intense flavor, so maybe things like truffles and spreads really are the way to go for bleu cheese (that's what rogue creamery does at any rate)

cocoavalley
Dec 28, 2010

Well son, a funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done

CrazySalamander posted:

Looking at rogue creamery it looks like they mix the bleu cheese with some cocoa powder (and probably other stuff) presumably to avoid the problem you're talking about. That being said, macarons aren't really famed for their intense flavor, so maybe things like truffles and spreads really are the way to go for bleu cheese (that's what rogue creamery does at any rate)

Yeah, this combo probably needs very careful balancing, and I lack the culinary instincts needed. BUT - I am not sorry for experimenting! The chocolate shells I made were very intense, and having never tasted the aforementioned truffles it was a shot in the dark at best. For now anyway, I might be better off starting with somewhat less adventurous flavor combos (like fruit and cheese) which I have a much better frame of reference.

CrazySalamander
Nov 5, 2009


http://www.lilliebellefarms.com/blue-cheese-chocolates/

Here's their site. Christmas is coming, so it might not hurt to give some hints to people if you wanted to try it.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



cocoavalley posted:

Tried a blue cheese filling in a few chocolate macarons using cream cheese as a 'carrier'. It's certainly interesting - the cheese funk sort of reveals itself only after the initial chocolate intensity subsides so they don't really complement as much as compete. I guess it makes sense since they are both earthy flavors ... I still want to try it with fruit shells, though.



Well they certainly look delicious.

A long time ago I had a skillet brownie filled with blue cheese and it was absolutely amazing. I'd love to have something like that again, but as you say it seems like it would require some pretty serious balancing to get right.

Probably a very common cookie problem: I was making a batch of the Alton Brown Chewy cookies, and they came out fine except a handful of the bottoms on them were very burnt. I actually noticed they were starting to get browned on the bottom already when I rotated them half way through. I baked them on parchment paper FWIW. I was recommend to try something like an AirBake sheet next time to help with that, anyone have any experience with these?

cocoavalley
Dec 28, 2010

Well son, a funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done

Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

Probably a very common cookie problem: I was making a batch of the Alton Brown Chewy cookies, and they came out fine except a handful of the bottoms on them were very burnt. I actually noticed they were starting to get browned on the bottom already when I rotated them half way through. I baked them on parchment paper FWIW. I was recommend to try something like an AirBake sheet next time to help with that, anyone have any experience with these?

Did you notice if the burned ones were happening in a particular area of your oven? Hot spots are definitely a thing, though it sounds like you already know this since you were rotating your pans. You can try different rack heights too. Are the tops coming out ok/baking normally (e.g., not too fast)? If you don't have one, an oven thermometer can help figure out if the temperature is off. I move a lot and bought one several apartments ago, it's been pretty useful. As far as sheets, I personally have not used air bake - my go-to's have always been the plain dark sheets by Wilton/Farberware/etc that seem to be sold everywhere. I also have shiny aluminum half sheets, but I always use parchment or silpats on those.

Anyone here ramping up for holiday cookie trays?



My favorites, though depending on circumstances most years I'll only make a few (the rainbow cookies, chocolate Italian meatball and butter cookies). Traveling and such will probably make this an especially light cookie year.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



cocoavalley posted:

Did you notice if the burned ones were happening in a particular area of your oven? Hot spots are definitely a thing, though it sounds like you already know this since you were rotating your pans. You can try different rack heights too. Are the tops coming out ok/baking normally (e.g., not too fast)? If you don't have one, an oven thermometer can help figure out if the temperature is off. I move a lot and bought one several apartments ago, it's been pretty useful. As far as sheets, I personally have not used air bake - my go-to's have always been the plain dark sheets by Wilton/Farberware/etc that seem to be sold everywhere. I also have shiny aluminum half sheets, but I always use parchment or silpats on those.

Didn't notice where they were happening no. Pretty much all the bottoms were at least a little burnt though, just some of them were REALLY burnt. I did rotate the pans and at two different heights (as per the recipe), I would not be surprised if my oven was just too hot though, I was already thinking of getting a thermometer to check it.

My mom actually recommended the AirBake sheets when I showed her what happened, she said they helped her a lot so I may end up picking some up before I cook the other half of the batch.

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
reginae venustatis his locis desunt


I have pans with an air cushion (I think a different brand) and I like them. It's possible to get perfect cookies from a regular sheet, but I feel like my pans extend that window of perfection.

JBark
Jun 27, 2000
Good passwords are a good idea.

Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

Didn't notice where they were happening no. Pretty much all the bottoms were at least a little burnt though, just some of them were REALLY burnt. I did rotate the pans and at two different heights (as per the recipe), I would not be surprised if my oven was just too hot though, I was already thinking of getting a thermometer to check it.

My mom actually recommended the AirBake sheets when I showed her what happened, she said they helped her a lot so I may end up picking some up before I cook the other half of the batch.

I find the Alton recipe does not like too much heat. Here in Oz with most ovens being fan forced (convection) only, I find I often have to cook them around 150C to prevent them browning too much before they are cooked through. That's just barely over 300F, and well below the usual 20C drop that most recipes seem to need when going from a regular oven to fan-forced. Also, if the dough isn't completely chilled through, they don't turn out right at all. I tried our airbake pan a couple times, but it ended up just leaving the bottoms under cooked, but that's probably expected with fan-forced vs. bottom element.

drat I can't wait until we remodel out kitchen, and get an oven that's not only bigger than 60cm x 60cm, but actually has proper controls.

Control Volume
Dec 31, 2008



Made pizzelles today

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



JBark posted:

I find the Alton recipe does not like too much heat. Here in Oz with most ovens being fan forced (convection) only, I find I often have to cook them around 150C to prevent them browning too much before they are cooked through. That's just barely over 300F, and well below the usual 20C drop that most recipes seem to need when going from a regular oven to fan-forced. Also, if the dough isn't completely chilled through, they don't turn out right at all. I tried our airbake pan a couple times, but it ended up just leaving the bottoms under cooked, but that's probably expected with fan-forced vs. bottom element.

drat I can't wait until we remodel out kitchen, and get an oven that's not only bigger than 60cm x 60cm, but actually has proper controls.

Huh, that's quite a drop since the recipe calls for 375F. Mine is a regular oven with a top heating element, maybe I'll try making the rest with an air cushion pan and @ 350 instead, see if that helps out.

Hutla
Jun 5, 2004


My apartment oven is kind of cheap and poorly insulated, so the gas burner will run constantly and scorch the bottom of most baked goods unless I put an empty sheet pan on a lower rack.

Rotten Cookies
Nov 11, 2008

gosh! i like both the islanders and the rangers!!! :^)


8 dozen cinnamon-cardamom sugar cookies
8 dozen pfeffernusse
6 dozen spumoni cookies.


My girlfriend and I made dough for 22 dozen cookies yesterday. Whew. My first time making the spumoni cookies. Found the recipe in an old cookbook my mom had. I had fun separating the dough into thirds, doing the different things, and layering them. It was pretty rewarding to see it take shape. All the dough is rolled out into snakes and in the freezer for now. The cookies are gonna be brought to 4 different parties. The spumoni cookies are only coming to three because of a nut allergy.


Anyway, I hope all these 'kies don't live up to my SA namesake.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

Huh, that's quite a drop since the recipe calls for 375F. Mine is a regular oven with a top heating element, maybe I'll try making the rest with an air cushion pan and @ 350 instead, see if that helps out.

I did try this and the cookies came out perfectly. Man I love the chewy recipe so much.


Next week is gonna get pretty crazy, we're making cookies for presents for all the relatives, of which we have quite a lot of, many with specific allergies. Anyone got some interesting/awesome cookies that don't have any eggs in them? We've got a few so far but I'm always on the look out for more.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Friends I have made the white choc macadamia cookies and they were extremely good, thanks for your love and support

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



cocoavalley posted:


Anyone here ramping up for holiday cookie trays?




Dang, that's impressive. Gingerbread cookies is a big Norwegian Christmas tradition. My girlfriend seems to be inspired by Hieronymus Bosch when she bakes them.

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006

Can I say "shit" around the baby?


Grimey Drawer

I bought a box of girl scout thin mint brownie mix to make a batch of brownie cookies but I've run into problems.

The box is 14 oz., the two recipes I found use 18/19 oz boxes. Also, the recipes call for all purpose flour but the brownie sample tasted so dense that I want to use cake flour instead of all-purpose flour. Does anyone have any advice?

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



Question about cookie storage. We're making cookies for Christmas and we had to start early since we'll be too busy to make them later in the week. If I want to ensure they stay as fresh as possible until then, should I just throw them in a tupperware and freeze them?

I know it's better to freeze the uncooked dough instead but our schedule is really packed this year.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

EVERY MORNING I OPEN PALM SLAM A BALL OF DOUGH ONTO A LIGHTLY FLOURED WORK SURFACE. ITS VEGAN GINGERBREAD COOKIE DOUGH AND RIGHT THERE AND THEN I START ROLLING IT OUT TO MAKE THE RECIPE, VEGAN GINGERBREAD COOKIES. I ROLL OUT EVERY COOKIE AND I ROLL IT OUT HARD.



Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

Question about cookie storage. We're making cookies for Christmas and we had to start early since we'll be too busy to make them later in the week. If I want to ensure they stay as fresh as possible until then, should I just throw them in a tupperware and freeze them?

I know it's better to freeze the uncooked dough instead but our schedule is really packed this year.

I'd just keep them in an airtight container, myself. I can't imagine freezing and defrosting cookies would much good for the texture.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«11 »