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Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

EX-GAIJIN AT LAST posted:

Especially on the DVDs and, Lord willing, eventually remastered for HD ,

I join you in this prayer but it is a slim, slim hope. I think we basically have to hope that some insane B5 fan manages to blackmail a Warner Bros executive.

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Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

EX-GAIJIN AT LAST posted:

Can we convince Elon Musk or Jeff Bezos to fund it?

I mean, that'd be nice too, if a super-rich fan just basically threw a shitload of cash at WB and said "here, it's loving free money for you, loving do it now."


Of course I wouldn't be surprised if WB was spiteful enough to say "wellllllll that's nice, but we just can't do it because of... reasons..."

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

EX-GAIJIN AT LAST posted:

That's why the sfx on the DVDs already look like crap - for all the effects shots they had to use the NTSC broadcast masters, which were 4:3 on video, and upscale/crop them to 16:9. The actual filmed portions are fine, but every single shot with any kind of effect would need the effect recreated from scratch and recomposited. And it probably has way more effects than TNG, which, as a more popular show already proved... unfulfilling from a monetary investment standpoint.

CBS really hosed up that release. When those Blurays were coming out I kept seeing my friends posting variations on "watching TNG on Netflix, still love this show". From a capitalist perspective, CBS should have yanked all streaming and broadcast rights while the Blurays came out so that the only way to watch TNG was either previously-bought DVDs or buying BD sets.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Data Graham posted:

I mean the acting, I mean jesus christ.

If overacting isn't your thing, space opera is probably not the right genre for you.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Kingtheninja posted:

What kind of space customs has one guy and no security?! Of course this guy is going to get killed by smugglers.

Babylon 5, like the production crew tasked with producing it, was pretty consistently shown to be severely underfunded.


I know it's ultra-corny as gently caress, but I love that moment in By Any Means Necessary where Sinclair tells the Earthgov stooge "you should never hand someone a weapon without knowing where they're going to point it. "

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

coyo7e posted:

Are there any documentary movies or books on the show's production and all the poo poo that went crazy? I have heard a lot in snippets here and there but it seems like something that'd be a really interesting thing to sit down and watch or read.

There's a bunch of behind-the-scenes interviews and production art here. I can't remember which interviews include it but there was apparently some drama between the CGI guys and Doug Netter.


One cool tidbit is that the Omega-class destroyers were originally intended to launch their fighters from the very edge of the rotating section, using the centripetal force to fling them out like B5's Cobra bays did.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Data Graham posted:

Jesus, Bruce Boxleitner is going to be the first one they tap to do the biopic of Bill Clinton, huh?



I always felt like Boxleitner with a beard would have been perfect to play Ulysses S. Grant

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Dirty posted:

Ron Thorton's ill

https://www.gofundme.com/2pbngrnc

We have him to think for all kinds of B5 CGI goodness.





One of the striking things about B5's CGI is that the "camera" work is really excellent.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

DrBouvenstein posted:

Also, that awkward elevator scene with Zack trying to hit on a telepathically possessed Lyta is hilarious.

uggghhhhhhh h


Honestly none of the movies really do it for me. Even In The Beginning is only barely "okay".

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Data Graham posted:

Wellóit has to do with certain easter eggs that might actually get someone in trouble if I elaborated here. I'll PM anyone interested.

I WANT TO KNOW MORE


(yes, I know, wrong space-fascists )

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Does anyone else get the impression that Delenn - at least at one point - was intended to be a low-level telepath?

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

hope and vaseline posted:

Isn't it weird how the one race that has legit prophets are the Centauri, who weren't visited by the Vorlons?

I'm rather glad of it - not everything has to tie back into one single origin.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Dirty posted:

Gideon's hover-bike chase and the Homunculous were particular low points, but I think they'd have looked bad in any series around that time period - they were both overambitious. I get that the homunculous wasn't supposed to be photoreal, but I assume was also supposed to not look laughable.

This was from the Firefly film, though, 6 years later. But yeah, Firefly CG was mostly much better than B5s. I partly place the blame more on budget and time, (and the mid-B5change in FX houses) though. Some early B5 space battles look much better than the later stuff.

I think the effects house change is big. The people at Netter Digital did not have the experience (or creative vision) that Foundation Imaging did.

Another thing is that technology was pretty rapidly progressing at that time, and Firefly still came out a couple years after Crusade did. More CPU power and more memory allows for more detailed models and effects.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Bieeardo posted:

I've been watching a few episodes a week with friends, and going through Clark's takeover a few weeks back was unsettling.

"Everything's gone to hell, John. God help us all; you're on your own."

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

turn left hillary!! noo posted:

We just had to buy a new season 2 because of some scratched discs, but they're only like $18 on Amazon.

Maybe if we buy enough of them we'll get interest from WB for a remaster... right guys? Right?

I bet if B5 was selling big the execs at WB would just say "well hell, they're already selling great, why bother spending any money on it??"

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

The Unlife Aquatic posted:

Honestly I'm disappointed this man hasn't been in more. He has such an excellent voice, like a rough-hewn knife - sharp yet earthy and rough.


Every time I see Sheridan with a beard I think it was a criminal waste that Boxleitner was never cast as General Ulysses S. Grant.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Pick posted:

Season 1 has some funny-rear end episodes too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22m3YR1tZ7k

My favorite scene from that episode is when Sheridan thinks that he's about to get chewed by Londo for being about to kiss one of his wives' hands, and then Londo takes him aside and basically says "woah, dude, watch out, she's bad fuckin' news." That "we'll talk later" at the end slays me.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Jedit posted:

Bester was meant to be 72 at the time;

...what?! Really?

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

I don't think there was supposed to be any ambiguity on the audience's part as to whether Sheridan was doing the right thing. Bombing Mars and Proxima were bad enough, but the show made a big deal out of Earth destroyers shooting down liners full of helpless civilians. There were numerous ways JMS could have tried to fuzz that - the liners ignored orders to heave to and prepare to be boarded, the liner tried playing chicken with a destroyer, make it not a fully loaded starliner but a transport shuttle trying to run the orbital blockade - but he pretty clearly chose to make it black-and-white mass murder. I think about the only way it could have been worse is if Clark had gone on a public broadcast and announced a general planetary bombardment with mass drivers against the secessionist colonists to exterminate them right down to every last traitorous man, woman, and child.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Were Douglas Netter or Harlan Ellison involved after the main series? Maybe the spinoffs were what happened when JMS didn't have them around to check him.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Timby posted:

Dude can't help but repeat himself. It's funny that he wrote the subplot of Garibaldi worrying about Sheridan's cult of personality, because Straczynski cultivated the mother of all cults of personality around him.

Even bigger than the Roddenberry cult?


Timby posted:

As I recall, he built Netter Digital in a kind of lovely way, basically doing a smash-and-grab on Foundation Imaging, robbing them of most of their best staff and rendering them a skeleton crew. Foundation was ready to go under until they got the Voyager contract at the last minute.

The guys at Foundation claim that Netter actually got the less-talented staff, didn't get their custom software package that allowed them to use the office computers as part of the render farm, and also didn't have the ultra-close relationship with Lightwave that Foundation Imaging did:

quote:

Interview with Ron Thornton

Oh to hell with it, lets get this out of the way. Since first contacting you Iíve got hold of a few other folks who worked on Babylon 5 Ė and learned a few things. I donít want to labour on the subject, but itís also clearly something worth touching on as it had wide ranging consequences to the show, and some of the fallout from it is still around even today. . . . . How did the situation arise that Foundation Imaging got kicked off Babylon 5?


It was obvious that the whole thing was a plan on behalf of Doug Netter to line his nest. Unbeknownst to JMS, Netter had tried to buy Foundation as part of his initial public offering of Netter Digital Entertainment.. (mainly because they actually had NO digital part of the company.) The deal breaker was that Netter wanted us to be exclusive... IE only do Netter jobs... This was business suicide. So we said no. This was only a few weeks before the renewal process started.

Now season 3 had been WAY more work than had been agreed to at the beginning of the season, and several huge episodes had taxed our budget. We went to the producers and said we needed an additional $40k to cover the overages... (This was for the whole season)... I had a meeting with Doug, and John Copeland to discuss what could be done to keep the next season under control.

Then a little while later something odd happened. I get a call from Doug. He seemed to be angry... "What's this I hear about you being 40,000 over budget on episode 310?" {Severed Dreams}.. I said... we werenít and that any overage was for the whole season like we discussed... Then it was as if he hadn't heard me... "well it's unacceptable, and I think Warners are going to have problems with it.." "But Doug... we talked about this... you know the situation.." "well it better not happen again" klick.bzzz, he hung up.

The only explanation I can think of is that he had JMS in the room, and he was grandstanding. So Joe would say... gently caress em... So we put in a budget based on what we had from season 3... and added the only way we might be able to cut costs would be to have some lesser experienced people as part of the team... (These were the same people Netter ended up hiring as his KEY designers BTW)

We then heard nothing... There was NO negotiation... Netter said it was Warner Bros that was holding everything up... Warners said it was Netter.... Then mysteriously Warner Bros said they needed all the Digital assets. We said... Sure... when we start season 4 we'll be pleased to. They said they wanted it now... we said... there's no-one here to do it.. Remember we ain't working on the show now! Netter had obviously asked them to do it.

The whole thing was a well thought out political move on behalf of Netter to get the cash flow for his new company. He played JMS like a flute!

...

In a podcast jms pointed out Netter & Copeland set up a facility to see if they could replicate your work. Once they thought that they could, thatís when Foundation got kicked off B5 - and they did that with the help of some of the new Foundation staff brought in to work on Hypernauts.

Shant and Patrick were basically not very nice people, they did a lot of this wheeling and dealing behind our backs whilst they were still employed by us. Patrick actually came begging to me saying, donít lay me off Iím just about to get a house and a mortgage, and all the rest of it. So I told him not to worry and we would find something for him to do. Then two weeks later he says heís not coming in to-morrow and heís leaving. I asked if he was going to work for Netter and he said no. But of course the deal had already been made, and thatís where he went.

Guess that's one way to become a senior animator (at NDE). Which explains the variable quality of Netters output. The increase in FX shots probably didnít help either.
I can't speak for how it went then as I have no idea how they operated the show. But it musthave been kind of unusual though, because they had no one who really had a clear idea how to do things. Their most senior guys were our juniors who were really only just starting out. As part of Netter they really couldnít say no to things either, they were on the payroll and just had to do what they had to do.


In Josh's interview he mentions a few things which highlight what your saying about not having anyone there with much experience. For example, the master copies of the models were stored centrally. Animators would rescale or retexture one for a particular shot and could overwrite the masters with their changes. Which may help explain why the sizes of various ships was all over the place in the later seasons.

Good grief! We were one of the first to have a large turnover pipeline for doing cgi. One of the first things Paul and myself worked on was how to preserve and archive things, and to make dam sure people didnít do that. We had show by show directories so if there was special modifications to something, like a Starfury for a particular scene, it would go into that showís directory. You could pull it out and put in any other showís directory if you needed to use it. But you never touched the holy grail - the master copies - which were also backed up.


quote:

Interview with Paul Bryant

Why let facts get in the way of a good belief. ; ) As you were/are a programmer, did you ever get involved with the development of Lightwave?

Not as a programmer. Lightwave was a constantly evolving product, and we were putting it through some very serious usage. We (more so Ron) were friends with Alan Hastings & Stuart Ferguson, and we worked with them almost on a daily basis letting them know what we'd like it to do (and I was getting a Lightwave update virtually every other week). THEY were the geniuses who figured out how to do it. Lens flares are a case in point.

John Knowles had just added them as a plugin for Photoshop, he got the algorithm from the Siggraph notes. Why he thought lens flares in a paint package was a good idea god only knows. Every cameraman spends his life trying to avoid them but a well placed one really adds a sense of depth to a shot as the flare traverses across the screen. Anyway, Ronny told Alan H that we wanted them. Alan asked for examples and I rendered the flares out of Photoshop onto black backgrounds and BBS'ed them over to him. Two days later we had fully realistic multi element (there's a flare caused by every surface) variable aperture (flares are shaped differently depending on the Ďcamerasí aperture) lens flares in Lightwave. It's first use was in the Demo that Ronny took to WB.



Did the close relationship continue past the B5 pilot, and if it did what other sort of requests where you making?

Very much so. Another example was specular mapping - at the time no software supported it. You get specular highlights on physical models easy enough with a combination of lighting and rubbing down or roughing up the surface slightly. But most programmers thought that reflection mapping was used for specular highlights.
The easiest way to explain it is the diffused highlights that you see on an egg or brushed steel. It's different from a reflection map because the reflection map projects back the light/ image of another object. Lightwave was one of the very first 3D packages to do it and it made all the difference in the realism of an object. The thing is though, when we left so did the relationship with Newtek. Iím not sure if Netter Digital ever had alpha status. Either way they didnít have access to Alan and Stuart.

Why?

What Netter & Copeland really failed to understand was the VFX community was tiny. We drank together, we played Quake together (somewhere out there are the Digital Domain and FI Quake floorplans/battlefields that our guys used to challenge DD with, but I digress) as a result we all knew what each of the companies were up to.

The reason that Netter Digital took over after season 3 was that Doug had earlier offered to take us over for $0.00 and assume all rights and options to anything we were creating in return for letting us do the fourth season. At that time Doug's outfit was called Rattlesnake Productions and he needed us to get the 'Digital' in the Netter Digital IPO. Ronny and I obviously told him to shove his deal where the sun don't shine. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . The only reason they were able to pull it off was that they bribed two of our animators xxxxxxxxx to backup the files at night and duplicate our system at Netter. See, Netter's contract with us only gave them rights to the final images (the actual content). This was long before the concept of 'digital assets' so they had to xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx them. We thought about suing them but we knew that they could outspend us. Hollywood is not a nice place. . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .One of my greatest pieces of evil knowledge was the fact that xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx didn't know how to xxxxxxx FIRE. As a result Netter were constantly repairing renders that had gone wrong from machines that had crashed. Job management was a nightmare for them. . . . . . . . . . .

...

Earlier you mentioned Netter Digital didnít get itís hands on FIRE. The late night visitors to your offices couldnít figure out how to nick copy it basically. Iíve heard the term used before, but what was (or is) FIRE?

FIRE (Foundation Imaging Render Environment) was FI's greatest secret and the key to our prodigious output. It was our own multiprocessor multitasking error correcting render controller. I conceived of it and designed it's basic architecture and Steve Pugh and I coded it in AREXX. Steve then went on to port it to the PC and enhance it vastly and made it into virtually an operating system (it's a thing of great beauty and it's running over at Eden because that's where Steve ended up).
It enabled us to use every computer in the place as a render engine and to handle things like job queuing, resource management, and (this was the biggie) automatic error recovery. If an animator left his desk all he had to do was click on the FIRE icon and FIRE would automatically take over the machine and become part of the collective. Once he returned he just clicked on the stop button and he got his workstation back. By the end of FI we had over 500 machines running as a virtual supercomputer (200 workstations & 300+ render engines). Nobody else had anything like this, it was years ahead of it's time.

B5 Scrolls

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

The facet of Babylon 5 that wouldn't fly today is that at heart it's a really sappy show.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

The Unlife Aquatic posted:

What I wouldn't give to listen to Garak and Londo have a conversation over dinner.

Dude. Gul Dukat and G'Kar.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Babylon 5 started airing about midway through the first season of seaQuest DSV

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

ConfusedUs posted:

SeaQuest was my jam even if it was hokey as gently caress

seaQuest DSV season 1 is still my jam. I think that bridge set is the best ever.

Hilariously there's even Blurays of it out now, apparently it had enough money thrown at it that when they did the CGI renders, they were rendered at higher-than-standard resolution - not high-def, but still high enough to be not as terrible when blown up. And they did 35mm prints of all the episodes for international distribution, so they were able to just rescan those prints and call it good.

Like, seaQuest. Who would have ever thought that series would get a Bluray release?

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Dirty posted:

But then Michael Ironside showed up. Everything is better with Michael Ironside. I'm ignoring the fact it was cancelled about 10 episodes later.

Season 3 was more consistent than season 2, but it wasn't good. And if that final episode was any indication of where the series was going, it needed to be put down.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Michael Ironside is only in season 3 and it's a bad season. Watch the first season and end there.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Kibayasu posted:

Besides some of the actors these days the only things I remember about Seaquest is that there was a dolphin and two of the later episodes, one which had terrorists or whatever blowing up gigantic global carbon dioxide scrubbers (because we killed all the plants???) and another where some guys were doing the decidedly non-sea-related activity of being commandos in a jungle. That may have been the same episode or neither being an episode of Seaquest at all.

The giant scrubbers being blown up was part of the second season opener. I don't remember the jungle commandos but I could totally buy that being a second or third season episode.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

I dunno, the telepath story was less grating for me than some of the early Lochley stuff ("nuhhhh some of us thought it was wrong to turn against your government (that was deliberately massacring its own civilians)" and "why? why does Sheridan trust you??" "because i'm his ex-wife okay???")

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

ConfusedUs posted:

Ultimately, I sort of dread this episode on each re-watch.


I don't even bother. I think I'd only ever bother watching if I was watching along with someone else who'd never seen the series before.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Milky Moor posted:

A drat shame. Warner Bros treatment of this show is really something.

Yeah, don't ever let anyone tell you businesses or corporations are governed solely by the almighty dollar. There's plenty of people in charge who will happily shoot themselves in both feet out of utter pettiness and spite.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Doctor Zero posted:

What do you have a problem with entire plot arcs being resolved by literally drawing names from a hat?

I heard it was a dartboard

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Most of the live-action footage for B5 was shot in 16:9, so a lot of what you're seeing wasn't zoomed or cropped.

That said, when they go to effects shots, those weren't created or composited in 16:9, so that's where it becomes zoomed and/or cropped.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

Jedit posted:

^^^ If you don't watch it, you miss a heck of a lot of setup for things that pay off later. It introduces Lyta Alexander, hints at the reason why Sinclair was made commander of B5 at the insistence of the Minbari, reveals the Narn lack of telepaths, and there's even a very subtle clue towards the longstanding alliance between the Minbari and the Vorlons (and possibly also to Sinclair's ultimate fate).

I don't think "you get more clues" is really a good enough reason to make a newcomer slog through the pilot, since a lot of those get brought up later anyway; the Narn telepath thing gets brought up in Legacies, the insistence on Sinclair being made commander gets brought up in (I think) And The Sky Full Of Stars, and the audience doesn't need to know Lyta Alexander for her later re-introduction to work.

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Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

ensign dwarf, set a course for getting blitzed the fuck out

warp factor nine

V-Men posted:

Roddenberry must have gotten kookier with age. In TOS he had Nichelle Nichols read for the parts of Spock and Bones because he hadn't decided that their characters would be male.

There were multiple factors that contributed to his deterioration:

- In the 60s, he was still relatively young and relatively successful. (Successful compared to other producers? Maybe not as much... but how many writers never manage to get a show on TV in the first place?) By the late 70s, he had sabotaged himself enough times that it was hard to deny that the apex of his career was a three-season show that never got great* ratings. So his natural insecurity only ever got worse.

- Paramount took creative control away from him after the trainwreck production of the first Trek movie, relegating him to "creative consultant" where he was promised that his memos would always be read, but there was no obligation to follow his advice/requests/dictates. To be fair, his memos were read, and some of his ideas were allegedly incorporated... but he was still very bitter over losing control, and moreso over the direction that the sequel movies took under producer Harve Bennett. This only played into his natural tendency to blame The Man and squabble with management, but it also spurred him to paranoia when TNG began production - he was always fearful that if a writer or producer became too good, Paramount would kick him out again and install the rising star in his place.

- Rabid Trekkies had spent a couple decades exulting Star Trek as great, brilliantly insightful art, and promoting Gene as an equally great and brilliant man. This fed his ego tremendously and made it easier for him to huff his own farts, but also fed a natural desire to blame others for his lack of success elsewhere.

- Gene had been smoking pot at least as far back as the late 60s, but in the 70s started experimenting with (and eventually, habitually using) harder drugs and developed a pretty severe drinking habit. This did his cognitive abilities no favors.

Between his natural insecurity and his paranoia, he (and his lawyer!) took to rewriting scripts, demanding unnecessary changes, and even just outright sabotaging some of the people who worked on the show. That would have been bad enough under a competent producer (or even Gene at his prime), but by 1986 after years of hard drug abuse, he was rapidly mentally and physically deteriorating. He was known to call in a writer to give notes on a script another writer had written.


TNG's first season saw thirty-five writers come and go. Gene (and his lawyer), through abusive behavior and bizarre witchhunts to ferret out perceived traitors, drove off the TOS old guard he'd initially hired on at the beginning. Paramount wound up paying off David Gerrold with a large undisclosed sum to settle an imminent lawsuit that, had Gerrold won, could have seen him awarded a permanent co-creator credit for his work on the TNG writers' bible.


How much of the racism and misogyny that erupted late in his life was due to his deterioration, or was simply better-hidden in his past, can't be said for certain. He was certainly always willing to exploit and use the women around him. But it's also entirely true that, just as some people's views evolve to be more enlightened as they grow older, some people's views go the opposite way.



In my opinion one of the big takeaways should be that if anyone tries to say "well, starting a sci-fi series is haaaard, look at TNG season 1," they're implicitly admitting they couldn't do better than a senile, drugged-out old man. Which isn't to say that starting a series isn't hard... just don't use TNG as your point of comparison!

Farmer Crack-Ass fucked around with this message at Jun 6, 2018 around 19:27

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