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ilkhan
Oct 7, 2004

IF I JUST LICK ENOUGH BOOT LEATHER, BIG DADDY TRUMP WILL SURELY LOVE ME

Warmachine posted:

I think this is where I've ultimately landed with my Ncase M1. I've never done a custom loop before, but something about this build just has me itching to take it all the way and see if I've got the skill and patience to complete it. Doing a double radiator GPU CPU loop in an M1 probably isn't a good first timer project but... hell with it. I reckon the hard part will be mapping the tubing runs and knowing what fittings I'll need so I don't buy a bunch that I don't need. But I've already got a general idea on this.

I'm not likely to finish until September though--I'm iffy on getting a new GPU before we hear more about the next gen parts. My 970 will suffice in the meantime.
Literally the same on the 970 GPU. I just started my project as a cpu only loop until September-ish when I plan on a 3070. Except instead on an N1 it's a fractal define 7. Plan was a 360+280, but having a surprisingly hard time getting the 280 to fit.

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CJacobs
Apr 17, 2011

Keep on keeping on.


Well. I just put together my first loop and I have a horror story for the thread to show for it. Ryzen 3700x and a 2080 TI FE went into it. Not a single leak anywhere, setting up the water blocks and the actual loop went perfectly. The pump works, everything connected right, pc booted up to desktop on the first try.

... Until I ran Heaven and my gpu rocketed to 80c and then crashed after 30 seconds of a blistering fast 10 fps. Thought it may have been a fluke but no it was not. Turns out I used the wrong size screws to screw in the waterblock (they were 5 mm, I should have used 4mm, OOPSIE ) and so it had poor contact with the copper.

So I undid everything, drained the gpu section of the loop, and took it apart to redo it with the right ones. Except, see pic included. The standoffs came off of the block because of the too-long screws in the PCB. Thus, pliers and gruntwork and a bit of weeping ensued. Lo and behold, I got everything assembled with the correct screws this time and... Nothing. No signal.

The gpu is seemingly just stone dead. PC boots to desktop still and the loop and cpu's temps are all perfect. An older gpu works fine in the mobo so it's gotta be the part itself. I have no idea how but I killed 1200 dollars worth of gpu. So let this be a lesson to you: learn to differentiate extremely tiny screws from one another because it may fry your graphics card.

Edit: the good news is the gpu is brand new so I may be able to RMA it if I put the air cooler back on and look away while whistling like I'm not incredibly guilty. For all I know it was already kinda busted and I just broke the camel's back!

CJacobs fucked around with this message at 14:44 on May 27, 2020

Theophany
Jul 22, 2014

"This is only the beginning of the reckoning. This is only the first sip, the first foretaste of a bitter cup which will be proffered to us year by year unless, by a supreme recovery of moral health and martial vigour, we arise again and take our stand for freedom as in the olden time."


CJacobs posted:

Well. I just put together my first loop and I have a horror story for the thread to show for it. Ryzen 3700x and a 2080 TI FE went into it. Not a single leak anywhere, setting up the water blocks and the actual loop went perfectly. The pump works, everything connected right, pc booted up to desktop on the first try.

... Until I ran Heaven and my gpu rocketed to 80c and then crashed after 30 seconds of a blistering fast 10 fps. Thought it may have been a fluke but no it was not. Turns out I used the wrong size screws to screw in the waterblock (they were 5 mm, I should have used 4mm, OOPSIE ) and so it had poor contact with the copper.

So I undid everything, drained the gpu section of the loop, and took it apart to redo it with the right ones. Except, see pic included. The standoffs came off of the block because of the too-long screws in the PCB. Thus, pliers and gruntwork and a bit of weeping ensued. Lo and behold, I got everything assembled with the correct screws this time and... Nothing. No signal.

The gpu is seemingly just stone dead. PC boots to desktop still and the loop and cpu's temps are all perfect. An older gpu works fine in the mobo so it's gotta be the part itself. I have no idea how but I killed 1200 dollars worth of gpu. So let this be a lesson to you: learn to differentiate extremely tiny screws from one another because it may fry your graphics card.

Edit: the good news is the gpu is brand new so I may be able to RMA it if I put the air cooler back on and look away while whistling like I'm not incredibly guilty. For all I know it was already kinda busted and I just broke the camel's back!

loving ouch dude.

Though I didn't even realise EK provided two different lengths of screws. Must be dumb luck I haven't done the same in past.

CJacobs
Apr 17, 2011

Keep on keeping on.


Yup, there are 4mm screws for the pcb, 6mm for the IO, and 7mm for the backplate. They included a few extra 6mm's and I used those on the pcb without realizing it because they looked similar.

Going to take the card to a repair shop to use their test bench and confirm that it's dead. That'll rule out the motherboard and power supply but I'm pretty sure it's the card already. RIP 2080 TI, you were so young.

CJacobs fucked around with this message at 15:05 on May 27, 2020

Warmachine
Jan 30, 2012

I came here to laugh at you






This makes me glad I'm starting small.

I can already see that custom fittings and tubing will make my cooling setup far better. The anti-kink springs on the Eisbaer's tubing do a great job of making sure the hoses don't kink and also making sure you can't position the hoses at all. It's tempting to get fittings and tubing now (or two paydays from now... whatever) and get everything hooked up in a sane way.

I'm a bit worried about clearance for fittings though. Doing things on an ITX board does NOT leave much side clearance off the block.

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


gwrtheyrn posted:

Earlier this week, my computer was occasionally making a loud, shuddering noise. Then, I woke up to my pump making an eve louder horrifying noise on saturday morning, and immediately turned off my computer. I drained my entire loop, disassembled my pump which is a D5, and gave it a good wipe down with some alcohol (high-proof vodka because there wasn't any isopropyl because corona). Once it was clean, I noticed that when spinning the pump by hand, there was a spot it seemed to get stuck on once per turn where the impeller would try to tilt. I went ahead and completely drained my loop because I already had a bunch of things disconnected, and ran some primochill sysreboot through my loop. The first run through, the liquid turned a pretty dark gray and looked like it had little fibers floating in it. I kept partially draining and refilling until the liquid came out clear and ran the clear sysreboot for 24 hours. I've since refilled it with regular coolant fluid, and for the most part things seem okay, except whenever I start up my computer, it seems like the pump has a hard time getting started. The noise I woke up to was apparently the pump stalling, and I get that for about 2-3 seconds when I boot my machine, but otherwise it seems to be fine now.

Is it time to buy a backup pump for when this one kicks the bucket?

... My computer just answered this question for me. New pump it is

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



Yeah once the bearings in the pump start to fail it's not going to get better and it's just a matter of time before it seizes up completely.

Warmachine
Jan 30, 2012

I came here to laugh at you





Is there anyone who can give me a measurement on the width between the back of the PCB and the top of an EKWB or similar low profile water block when attached to a card? I need to know how thick it is from that point. Backplate doesn't matter, since there's more than enough space in that direction.

krysmopompas
Jan 17, 2004
hi

How can one determine the cooling capacity of a radiator?

I need to stuff a new workstation into a 2u rack, keeping it relatively quiet, and Iím hoping a quad 80mm alphacool ut60 could handle 280 watts of threadripper.

Canna Happy
Jul 11, 2004
The engine, code A855, has a cast iron closed deck block and split crankcase. It uses an 8.1:1 compression ratio with Mahle cast eutectic aluminum alloy pistons, forged connecting rods with cracked caps and threaded-in 9 mm rod bolts, and a cast high

krysmopompas posted:

How can one determine the cooling capacity of a radiator?

I need to stuff a new workstation into a 2u rack, keeping it relatively quiet, and Iím hoping a quad 80mm alphacool ut60 could handle 280 watts of threadripper.

You need to know fan speeds, water/air temp deltas etc. Honestly, I don't think it will be cool or quiet as I believe you'll need to run fans at 2k+ rpm. Doubling the thickness isn't nearly as effective as doubling the surface area of the radiator. You'll also most likely need to run push/pull with the 60mm radiator. This is just me rambling.

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


A quad 80 is about 10% less surface area than a 240, so it could be enough, but is it going to be sitting in a hot closet and what kind of pressure/cfm can you get with 80mm fans before they get super loud. Presumably you're not getting deltas so you can have the sound of a jet taking off forever. The only real way to know for sure is to try it

Warmachine
Jan 30, 2012

I came here to laugh at you





On the consumer side of things, that's been the difficult part of getting into this for me. It's relatively easy to find the specs on a fin stack and make a rough guess as to what kind of thermal rejection I can expect (this is generally a pass/fail assessment with lots of error), but the radiator question has been entirely opaque, because a 240x25mm radiator is not the same as 240x60mm radiator. The rule of thumb I've always been given is 120mm per component with an extra 120mm for overclock headroom/safety.

This is a practically worthless rule of thumb though because ok, 120mm on a 65w processor and 120mm on a 125w processor is going to have a very different effect, let alone the effect of the thickness I mentioned before.

Canna Happy posted:

You need to know fan speeds, water/air temp deltas etc.

But I don't buy why manufacturers can't control for this and provide a metric to compare between products. Even if it is only good internally because there's no standard (hi TDP), it would help when selecting what product to buy or judging how feasible a project is.

krysmopompas
Jan 17, 2004
hi

Yeah, thatís a bit of an expensive experiment with a low chance of success, but it sounds like a 3950x will be fine based on your surface area estimate.

Thanks.

Time Crisis Actor
Apr 28, 2002


I sexually identify as a fat tinder girl,

Yeah lemme just clean my pannus first.

These candles smell amazing btw


Iíve had an old EKWB AIO sitting in my closet for a few years which I bought on a whim. It has been sitting in the box since 2016 or so, and Iíve only taken it out a few times to look at it. I finally have a case with some room for a big radiator, so I figured that I could finally install this AIO.

Is there any risk to running a component that is this old, even though itís completely unused? Is there anything I can or should do to test for functionality? Itís definitely not under warranty any more, and is past EOL status.

Theophany
Jul 22, 2014

"This is only the beginning of the reckoning. This is only the first sip, the first foretaste of a bitter cup which will be proffered to us year by year unless, by a supreme recovery of moral health and martial vigour, we arise again and take our stand for freedom as in the olden time."


Time Crisis Actor posted:

Iíve had an old EKWB AIO sitting in my closet for a few years which I bought on a whim. It has been sitting in the box since 2016 or so, and Iíve only taken it out a few times to look at it. I finally have a case with some room for a big radiator, so I figured that I could finally install this AIO.

Is there any risk to running a component that is this old, even though itís completely unused? Is there anything I can or should do to test for functionality? Itís definitely not under warranty any more, and is past EOL status.

If it's the Phoenix line you should be able to drain and refill it with a hex key on the radiator. Even though I'm 90% certain the fluid is the EK Cryo clear stuff, I'd absolutely do it for peace of mind.

Time Crisis Actor
Apr 28, 2002


I sexually identify as a fat tinder girl,

Yeah lemme just clean my pannus first.

These candles smell amazing btw


Theophany posted:

If it's the Phoenix line you should be able to drain and refill it with a hex key on the radiator. Even though I'm 90% certain the fluid is the EK Cryo clear stuff, I'd absolutely do it for peace of mind.

It's the Predator line, so even older. You recommend I still drain and refill it?

Edit: I checked and the fluid they use is "EK-Ekoolant EVO Clear", which EK apparently doesn't sell any more. Can I substitute this for something else?

Time Crisis Actor fucked around with this message at 22:35 on Jun 30, 2020

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Theophany
Jul 22, 2014

"This is only the beginning of the reckoning. This is only the first sip, the first foretaste of a bitter cup which will be proffered to us year by year unless, by a supreme recovery of moral health and martial vigour, we arise again and take our stand for freedom as in the olden time."


Time Crisis Actor posted:

It's the Predator line, so even older. You recommend I still drain and refill it?

Edit: I checked and the fluid they use is "EK-Ekoolant EVO Clear", which EK apparently doesn't sell any more. Can I substitute this for something else?

Personally I would, just because even the clear stuff will degrade over time, even if it isn't being thermally cycled frequently. I have a bottle of it in a cupboard somewhere and it has a suggested shelf life printed on the bottle.

I shouldn't think it matters what fluid you use beyond slight performance differences.

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