Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«16 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Gibbo
Sep 13, 2008

"yes James. Remove that from my presence. It... Offends me" *sips overpriced wine*


God thick radiators are so ugly. If you want the extra surface area just buy a drat 3*3. They're cheaper anyhow, especially once you factor in the fans.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Welmu
Oct 9, 2007
Metri. Piiri. Sekunti.

Gibbo posted:

If you want the extra surface area just buy a drat 3*3.
The 560xXx is ~150mm wide, which is relatively close the dimensions of how much a motherboard + GPUs take up space. A 3x3 would just be ungainly.

edit: I'll post a terribad Sketchup model once work ends so you can point out all the flaws.

Welmu fucked around with this message at Aug 23, 2016 around 12:40

headlor
Nov 17, 2003
prepare the quantum monkey

I'm unreasonably proud that my first attempt at watercooling something worked:

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


headlor posted:

I'm unreasonably proud that my first attempt at watercooling something worked:



No drain

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

I hear milk is a good fluid to use for watercooling.

headlor
Nov 17, 2003
prepare the quantum monkey

Yeah it's good cos you get a constant supply of yogurt. And yeah, I did realise as soon as it was finished that I had no way of getting the water out.

But gently caress it. Cross that bridge when I come to it.

Potato Salad
Oct 23, 2014




Tortured By Flan

That's some good inexpensive cable management right there. Tidy.

Maybe consider putting in a drain sooner than later -- you aren't on edge due to a hardware failure right now and can take your time with it to do it right. In the future, you might not want to be tempted to take shortcuts.

headlor
Nov 17, 2003
prepare the quantum monkey

You're probably right. Lowest point on the loop is the best spot for a drain I would assume?

Of course, my upside down radiator is still going to be full of fluid.

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


headlor posted:

You're probably right. Lowest point on the loop is the best spot for a drain I would assume?

Of course, my upside down radiator is still going to be full of fluid.

Your radiator probably has a drain port on the bottom. put a elbow and tvalve there, and then put a y fitting off the reservoir and put another tvalve off it.

or do a 4 way fitting and put a tvalve and a water temp sensor there.

headlor
Nov 17, 2003
prepare the quantum monkey

Yeah the radiator has a drain port on it. But cos it's upside down it's at the top without a lot of clearance from the case.

I think I'm going to do a v2 at some point with everything shuffled around and more consideration for draining and filling. But hey, first attempt and it cools the cpu, so still a win.

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


headlor posted:

Yeah the radiator has a drain port on it. But cos it's upside down it's at the top without a lot of clearance from the case.

I think I'm going to do a v2 at some point with everything shuffled around and more consideration for draining and filling. But hey, first attempt and it cools the cpu, so still a win.

Ahh yea i see. My rx480 i just realized only has ports on one side. My EK front rad has one drain port on the other side of the other ports on the rad.

Gibbo
Sep 13, 2008

"yes James. Remove that from my presence. It... Offends me" *sips overpriced wine*


headlor posted:

Yeah the radiator has a drain port on it. But cos it's upside down it's at the top without a lot of clearance from the case.

I think I'm going to do a v2 at some point with everything shuffled around and more consideration for draining and filling. But hey, first attempt and it cools the cpu, so still a win.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigonometric_functions

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbreviation


I'm not surprised you're using dye or colored coolant in a home system with language like that. Take that poo poo out when you put your drain in.

Welmu posted:

The 560xXx is ~150mm wide, which is relatively close the dimensions of how much a motherboard + GPUs take up space. A 3x3 would just be ungainly.

edit: I'll post a terribad Sketchup model once work ends so you can point out all the flaws.

3x3s are super easy to make standing or hanging rad boxes for that take up a lot less room than you'd think they would. And quick disconnects make them a lot easier to deal with these days than they used to be.

The water cooling is all about "user taste' though. And the taste of 20$ per fan (and increased noise) needed to properly use a thick radiator like that is not one I enjoy. All the power to you though.

Gibbo fucked around with this message at Aug 23, 2016 around 16:27

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


If it has a low FPI then you can still use slow fans.

PerrineClostermann
Dec 15, 2012

Protect our Friends!

Anti-Poaching Task Force
Japari Park Service


Isn't Mayhem's nano coolant supposed to not have those issues?

headlor
Nov 17, 2003
prepare the quantum monkey

Alright, so coolant question. I take it from gibbos weirdly hostile comment that buying off the shelf pre-mixed coolant is not the hip thing.

So what, deionised, distilled water?

Why not the sort of waterless coolant we use in cars. That stuff has insane operational ranges.

edit: oh wait, I answered my own question. The high performance coolant is useful because it doesn't turn to steam so it remains useful as a coolant longer. Hopefully a CPU will never push it up to the point where it's trying to boil away so it doesn't matter if it has a higher boiling point/lower freezing point.

headlor fucked around with this message at Aug 23, 2016 around 23:52

Paul MaudDib
May 2, 2006

"Tell me of your home world, Usul"


headlor posted:

Alright, so coolant question. I take it from gibbos weirdly hostile comment that buying off the shelf pre-mixed coolant is not the hip thing.

So what, deionised, distilled water?

Why not the sort of waterless coolant we use in cars. That stuff has insane operational ranges.

edit: oh wait, I answered my own question. The high performance coolant is useful because it doesn't turn to steam so it remains useful as a coolant longer. Hopefully a CPU will never push it up to the point where it's trying to boil away so it doesn't matter if it has a higher boiling point/lower freezing point.

Yeah, deionized or distilled, it really makes no difference since it will pick up metal ions from the inside of the loop anyway. Then you add some biocide to kill off anything that might start growing.

And yeah, water is perfectly fine within the range of 0-100C and hopefully you are not getting your loop outside that range. The fancy car antifreeze is there to keep the radiator from freezing if it drops below 0C outside. There's nothing wrong with using something like ethylene glycol in most situations - it's used in AIO loops - but it does you no good unless you expect to be running your rig below 0C or above 100C.

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


I use ek clear coolant concentrate but mayhem's x1 is fine also. It's usually one concentrate bottle plus 900ml of distilled water. NOT deionised Water

Shrimp or Shrimps
Feb 14, 2012


No-spill quick disconnects (QDC) are the best thing to happen to watercooling. I'm sad I got out of it before they became a thing (I only ever really used low-spill QDCs and holding a bunch of tissue beneath the fitting as you unplug it is kind of an adrenaline rush, what I like to live dangerously okay).

But they are real flow killers, so just go serial with two pumps if you have a ton in your loop. Then you get redundancy as well. I used to run 2 modded diyinhk DDC2s in serial. They weren't exactly quiet.

But QDCs make replacing components trivial. If you get a new GPU/block, all you have to do is disconnect, install new component, reconnect, then top up your resevoir and bleed for about 2 minutes. So much better than tearing down the loop, draining, etc.

Gibbo
Sep 13, 2008

"yes James. Remove that from my presence. It... Offends me" *sips overpriced wine*


Quick disconnects are pretty nice, but between the price and what their actually function is, why would you ever use more than one or two?

Reasons I want to buy a pair: makes external radbox easier to deal with; makes drainless systems a little easier to drain.

Throwing them in willy nilly between every component is throwing money away as you double the amount of fittings you're using and doubling the amount of potential leaks.


The hostility was for your disregard for the English language.

The bit about the dyes is because dyes and heavy colorants really shouldn't be in home systems long term. They stain poo poo, leave deposits, can eventually degrade (which leads to more deposits), and can lead to you putting off tearing down your system to fix something minor because you don't want to waste your fancy fluids. Then when you do it strip it down, it can make it harder to tell what's actually degradation and what's just staining if you're going over your block interiors.

Things like thick white or black are especially bad and is basically computer show fluid, not something you want to run 24/7.


Edit; lol my probation got me a title. Butt hurt bitches.

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

Deuce
Jun 18, 2004
Mile High Club

Potato Salad posted:

If you are absolutely sure you don't have a cooler that takes advantage of crossflow to increase efficiency or want to ignore that feature altogether, knock yourself out.

What does this have to do with anything?

Shrimp or Shrimps
Feb 14, 2012


Gibbo posted:

Quick disconnects are pretty nice, but between the price and what their actually function is, why would you ever use more than one or two?

Reasons I want to buy a pair: makes external radbox easier to deal with; makes drainless systems a little easier to drain.

Throwing them in willy nilly between every component is throwing money away as you double the amount of fittings you're using and doubling the amount of potential leaks.

For me, I stuck them in tubes on the blocks. That way, when I switched out my mobo/cpu/gpu I could just plug in new blocks into the existing loop without pulling out the radiators from the case.

I had an MM H2G0 matx cube case with 2 x 120x2 and 2 x 120x1 radiators and taking out the whole thing is just a huge pain in the rear end as the case doesn't give you much room unless you tear it all apart.

This was back when I was switching up graphics cards and CPUs fairly often. For a set-it-and-forget it, I could see why you wouldn't need them, but for any future loop I do, I will always make my CPU block and GPU block fully detachable without having to remove any other component of the loop. But even 4 QDCs is enough to hurt flow quite a bit.

Edit: It also makes testing and troubleshooting components trivially easy. This scenario has happened to me plenty of times:

Build closed loop, power on new system, no graphics output. Want to throw in another card to test it? Either you tear down the loop or try to slot another one in while holding the maybe-faulty one or perching it somewhere or maybe the PCIE x4 slot if your tubing allows that movement without kinking. Got a small matx case? Good luck.

Being able to just pull out the block+card, slot in a length of tubing with QDCs to "complete" the loop, and then you can throw in another card to test.

Shrimp or Shrimps fucked around with this message at Aug 27, 2016 around 02:57

ate shit on live tv
Feb 15, 2004


What's the advantage of a drain? Why not just use the pump itself to clear the system with a res at the bottom?

I made a custom water cooling system back when the C2Ds were the new hotness. I ran a single loop, CPU -> GPU water cooled, Peltier system with a single pump and radiator and reservoir. The volume of the system was ~6 liters. It's still running fine today. No Quick Disconnects, just 3/8" OD tubing that I bought from the hardware store for <1$/ft and used pipe clamps. Most expensive parts of the build were the CPU/GPU waterblocks which were around 150 for both. Pump was 35, Reservoir was 5, radiator was 20.

Whenever I drained it, I'd just siphon from the reservoir, and use the pump to clear the system. Reservoir was the low point in the system naturally anyway. It was great and 100% silent. When I finally replaced my ancient 5400rpm hard drive with an SSD, I didn't even know my PC was on. Also I had the radiator outside of the case with single 120mm fan for cooling.

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


Powercrazy posted:

What's the advantage of a drain? Why not just use the pump itself to clear the system with a res at the bottom?

I made a custom water cooling system back when the C2Ds were the new hotness. I ran a single loop, CPU -> GPU water cooled, Peltier system with a single pump and radiator and reservoir. The volume of the system was ~6 liters. It's still running fine today. No Quick Disconnects, just 3/8" OD tubing that I bought from the hardware store for <1$/ft and used pipe clamps. Most expensive parts of the build were the CPU/GPU waterblocks which were around 150 for both. Pump was 35, Reservoir was 5, radiator was 20.

Whenever I drained it, I'd just siphon from the reservoir, and use the pump to clear the system. Reservoir was the low point in the system naturally anyway. It was great and 100% silent. When I finally replaced my ancient 5400rpm hard drive with an SSD, I didn't even know my PC was on. Also I had the radiator outside of the case with single 120mm fan for cooling.

Sounds like a good way to run your pump dry. Your res feeds your pump. You are either going to be pushing a ton of air with your pump through the system or leavea ton of fluid inside.

lock stock and Cheryl
Dec 18, 2009

by zen death robot


Heyall, I'm doing some early research on water cooling for a future setup.

1. Are all-copper water cooling setups (block, line, and radiator) common?

if so,

2. Are there kits that you can use standard plumbing tools to solder systems together? (plumbing torch, lead solder, standard copper tubing)?

if not,

3. How easy is it to manage corrosion in Cu-Al systems? Do the additives actually work?

4. Is it easy to source parts if I want to assemble my own system?

5. How do you avoid leaks?

PerrineClostermann
Dec 15, 2012

Protect our Friends!

Anti-Poaching Task Force
Japari Park Service


The answer is you don't use aluminum in your loop ever. Common metals are copper, nickel (usually plated on copper), and brass.

Parts are easy enough to source, but typically only available from a few retailers. For instance, in the US, you're limited to Frozen CPU (which had a very wonderful bit of drama and unprofessionalism, look it up) and Performance PCs (which has had many customer service nightmare stories told, but worked fine enough for me).

As for leaks, you avoid them by just doing your connections properly. I built my first loop this summer, did the 24 hour leak test and found nothing. The compression fittings in the kit I used (L360 from EKWB) worked great, and were easy to use.

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


Amazon also has lots of stuff through third party sellers. Some of it prime.

rage-saq
Mar 21, 2001

Thats so ninja...

Kaleidoscopic Gaze posted:

Heyall, I'm doing some early research on water cooling for a future setup.

1. Are all-copper water cooling setups (block, line, and radiator) common?

if so,

2. Are there kits that you can use standard plumbing tools to solder systems together? (plumbing torch, lead solder, standard copper tubing)?

if not,

3. How easy is it to manage corrosion in Cu-Al systems? Do the additives actually work?

4. Is it easy to source parts if I want to assemble my own system?

5. How do you avoid leaks?

Get an EKWB kit. The L series if you want something basic and low cost or the P series if you want to build something high performance. The pricing is pretty good and EKWBs gear is pretty solid.

GutBomb
Jun 15, 2005

Dude?


I know the AIO systems are frowned upon by the custom loop snobs but if you're a non-snob that's on the fence about getting an AIO system I replaced a 212 evo with a NZXT x61 and the stock cooler on my GTX 1080 founders edition with an NZXT x31 with a g10 bracket and it dropped my overclocked GPU temps from 80c under load to 60c and my overclocked CPU load temps from 60c to 40c. The best part is that it is SO much quieter. Also each part has a 6 year warranty.

Highly recommended for someone that doesn't want to mess with every little thing but still wants water cooling.

GutBomb fucked around with this message at Aug 31, 2016 around 03:49

PerrineClostermann
Dec 15, 2012

Protect our Friends!

Anti-Poaching Task Force
Japari Park Service


AIOs are fun and cheap compared to custom loops. More power to you.

CSi-NA-EJ7
Feb 21, 2007


I have an AIO, H100i gtx paired with some noctua fans because the stock Corsair ones were dumb loud. I really want to get a custom loop going, but

GutBomb
Jun 15, 2005

Dude?


PerrineClostermann posted:

AIOs are fun and cheap compared to custom loops. More power to you.

I was paranoid about my VRM and VRAM chips getting hot so I got some heatsinks today for both so I had to take the whole g10 assembly off to put them on. This entailed removing the thermal paste that was originally applied from the factory on the nzxt cold plate. I applied my own as well as adding the heat sinks to the little chips and now my GPU load temps after an hour of running the Dirt Rally benchmark (my go-to since it's fairly demanding, an actual game I play a lot instead of something synthetic, and can be looped) are 43c instead of 60c. Really impressed, and it's convinced me to never use the pre-applied thermal paste on anything ever again.

Deuce
Jun 18, 2004
Mile High Club

Just completed initial assembly of my first custom watercooling build!

Case is an Enthoo Luxe, a slightly bigger brother of the Enthoo Pro. It's essentially the same chassis as the Pro, but with a larger top bay you can put fans into and some fancy controllable LED case lighting.

Went with PETG hard tubing, UV green with a fancy helix reservoir.



My very first tubing run, which would come to bite me in the rear end. (CPU -> VRM)
I had to trim down the tube to get it to actually install here (two compression fittings on such a tiny tube couldn't both be in place and allow the tube to squeeze into the spots) End result? A fountain when I first fired up the pump. Whoops! But this is why you always run the pump with the entire system unplugged. In addition to the fountain at the top of the CPU, the CPU block itself was leaking. Had the system been powered, I would have absolutely killed the motherboard, the GPU (water was running over the back of the GPU board, underneath the backplate, and probably the CPU. Even the power supply was at risk with water getting onto the top of it.



My first attempt at a 90 degree bend... didn't go so well.



Progress being made. Upper left corner radiator outlet was a bastard, had to go back to Microcenter and get a 45-degree angle fitting because a regular fitting couldn't get in there thanks to the motherboard's huge plastic cover over the I/O. Here you also see the fancy helix reservoir I picked.
From the bottom of the CPU block, tube runs to the radiator at the front of the case. I wanted this to be a nice 90 degree turn, but it was to tight a radius so I opted for a 45 degree turn instead.


This tube is at the front of the case, connecting the pump at the bottom to the front radiator. Tight space, was challenging, and in the end I didn't get the bend right so had to do that little jig at the end near the top... but it's hidden behind a panel anyway so I just said "screw it" and kept this ugly one in there.



The GPU -> reservoir in.

This is when I fired up the pump for the first time and got a fountain. The CPU -> VRM connector just was too short, and I couldn't get a long enough one to squeeze in there. So, I came up with a different solution:


An alternative plan would have been to go from the CPU to the VRM port on the left instead of above, and in hindsight would have been easier. I assumed a tiny, straight tube would have been the easiest, but geometry defeated me, and this method was easier. Redo one connection instead of three.

All set for leak test #2



It's working so far, running for a few hours with no leaks. Will keep running the rest of the day, but I think I'm in the clear. Plus, the helix is a bubble magnet so this will probably take quite some time to bleed out:



In hindsight, I really should have gone with soft tubing for a first custom loop. I do have one soft tube line with barb fitting for filling and draining, and holy cow is soft tubing easy to work with. But I wanted the challenge and learning experience, and boy did I get it it. Getting hard tubes to fit just right is tough.

But goons thinking about watercooling: soft tubes seem like they'd be really easy. If you figured out how to put your computer together, you can figure out this.

Deuce
Jun 18, 2004
Mile High Club

Kaleidoscopic Gaze posted:

Heyall, I'm doing some early research on water cooling for a future setup.

1. Are all-copper water cooling setups (block, line, and radiator) common?
No. Typically the tubing is a soft plastic-type. Hard tubes are usually acryllic or PETG, bent with a heat gun. (or hell, a hair dryer could probably do it) I've heard that Primochill's "advanced LRT" tubes are popular for soft tubes, some types of tubes have issues with plasticizer leeching out of the tube and gunking up parts.

quote:

if so,

2. Are there kits that you can use standard plumbing tools to solder systems together? (plumbing torch, lead solder, standard copper tubing)?
There are kits, but you don't need to solder anything. Fittings screw into their respective inlets, and soft tubes use either a compression fitting or a barb fitting plus something to hold them on. (a clamp, or even zipties)

quote:

if not,

3. How easy is it to manage corrosion in Cu-Al systems? Do the additives actually work?
Don't use aluminum. Plenty of copper parts out there.

quote:

4. Is it easy to source parts if I want to assemble my own system?
Yes. EKWB is a big name for higher-end parts. They ship from Slovenia or something, but their stuff is good. Alphacool is another big brand.

You can get everything from newegg. Microcenter is a good option as well, but their stock may be limited. My local Microcenter had a fair bit of stuff but their assortment of fittings was... not remotely sorted. Basically I was stuck digging through bins of random fittings to find what I wanted. The advantage of Microcenter was that I was able to return fittings when I had the wrong ones, or too many. You can return stuff through Newegg too, but obviously that's more of a pain.

quote:

5. How do you avoid leaks?
Compression fittings will screw down onto an o-ring to seal up. Barb fittings usually have a clamp to hold the tube in place.

After just doing my first build (see above), I would suggest ordering the main parts from Newegg's marketplace, but wait until you actually get them in your case and installed before deciding on tubing and fittings. Get it all mounted, plan it out, etc. So you don't have to make three trips to Microcenter like I did because goddamnit these are the wrong fittings and oh poo poo that one in the top left doesn't actually fit and why did I get these low profile 90-degree fittings they don't actually clear far enough to use a compression fitting at all aaaaaaaahhhhhhhhh

Easier if you have a local shop to get fittings, otherwise you'd have to wait a few days for another shipment.

Since you've asked about plumbing tools, I'll assume that you have some kind of experience with that sort of thing. Copper pipes do work and I've seen people build with them. They look pretty cool. This guy looks like he used the same compression fittings you use on any other hard tube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zfyy2uMNnM

Deuce fucked around with this message at Sep 1, 2016 around 21:23

lock stock and Cheryl
Dec 18, 2009

by zen death robot


Deuce posted:

No. Typically the tubing is a soft plastic-type. Hard tubes are usually acryllic or PETG, bent with a heat gun. (or hell, a hair dryer could probably do it) I've heard that Primochill's "advanced LRT" tubes are popular for soft tubes, some types of tubes have issues with plasticizer leeching out of the tube and gunking up parts.

There are kits, but you don't need to solder anything. Fittings screw into their respective inlets, and soft tubes use either a compression fitting or a barb fitting plus something to hold them on. (a clamp, or even zipties)

Don't use aluminum. Plenty of copper parts out there.

Yes. EKWB is a big name for higher-end parts. They ship from Slovenia or something, but their stuff is good. Alphacool is another big brand.

You can get everything from newegg. Microcenter is a good option as well, but their stock may be limited. My local Microcenter had a fair bit of stuff but their assortment of fittings was... not remotely sorted. Basically I was stuck digging through bins of random fittings to find what I wanted. The advantage of Microcenter was that I was able to return fittings when I had the wrong ones, or too many. You can return stuff through Newegg too, but obviously that's more of a pain.

Compression fittings will screw down onto an o-ring to seal up. Barb fittings usually have a clamp to hold the tube in place.

After just doing my first build (see above), I would suggest ordering the main parts from Newegg's marketplace, but wait until you actually get them in your case and installed before deciding on tubing and fittings. Get it all mounted, plan it out, etc. So you don't have to make three trips to Microcenter like I did because goddamnit these are the wrong fittings and oh poo poo that one in the top left doesn't actually fit and why did I get these low profile 90-degree fittings they don't actually clear far enough to use a compression fitting at all aaaaaaaahhhhhhhhh

Easier if you have a local shop to get fittings, otherwise you'd have to wait a few days for another shipment.

Since you've asked about plumbing tools, I'll assume that you have some kind of experience with that sort of thing. Copper pipes do work and I've seen people build with them. They look pretty cool. This guy looks like he used the same compression fittings you use on any other hard tube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zfyy2uMNnM

Awesome! Thanks for the point-by-point. I think I'll consider water-cooling a bit down the line. From what everyone says, looks like standard equipment is the ticket, but I'm not sure I want to spend $300-500 on watercooling for my next rig.

Deuce
Jun 18, 2004
Mile High Club

Kaleidoscopic Gaze posted:

Awesome! Thanks for the point-by-point. I think I'll consider water-cooling a bit down the line. From what everyone says, looks like standard equipment is the ticket, but I'm not sure I want to spend $300-500 on watercooling for my next rig.
These can save the budget a wee bit, essentially they are the custom loop kits pre-assembled. They come pre-filled with quick disconnect fittings so you can actually expand them down the lines if you want to add a GPU block or something. (EK will sell GPU blocks pre-filled with QDCs as well) A high quality AIO, basically.

https://www.ekwb.com/shop/aio

Or something a bit more basic
http://www.performance-pcs.com/alph...-lt-st-kit.html

Deuce fucked around with this message at Sep 2, 2016 around 16:38

atomicthumbs
Dec 26, 2010

We're in the business of extending man's senses.


what if you just hook up a laser cutter chiller to a cooling loop

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


atomicthumbs posted:

what if you just hook up a laser cutter chiller to a cooling loop

If you cool below ambient you will get condensation.

PerrineClostermann
Dec 15, 2012

Protect our Friends!

Anti-Poaching Task Force
Japari Park Service


atomicthumbs posted:

what if you just hook up a laser cutter chiller to a cooling loop

Chilled loops are a thing and really cool, but require extra effort and cash.

Deuce
Jun 18, 2004
Mile High Club

atomicthumbs posted:

what if you just hook up a laser cutter chiller to a cooling loop

A crapload of extra noise and power consumption, generally opposite of the intention of water cooling.

If you're going below ambient, you'll get condensation inside your case. If you're going below freezing, you need antifreeze additives and you'll get frost inside your case.

Systems can be built to deal with this, but this is pretty extreme territory.

Deuce fucked around with this message at Sep 2, 2016 around 20:49

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

atomicthumbs
Dec 26, 2010

We're in the business of extending man's senses.


do you people not keep your computer inside a dessicated box or what

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«16 »