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Saukkis
May 16, 2003

Unless I'm on the inside curve pointing straight at oncoming traffic the high beams stay on and I laugh at your puny protest flashes.
I am Most Important Man. Most Important Man in the World.

namlosh posted:

So I'd like to upgrade it as easily and cheaply as possible. I figure even though she's using like 25% of the available hard drive space, I'll get a 1TB so it'll be an easy clone.

The only thing that was really confusing was that the manual and such mentions that it'll take a M.2 drive? should I look into getting one of those? or does it not matter and I should just grab a cheap 2.5-inch SSD?
if it doesn't matter, is this one ok?

I think the biggest pro for the M.2 is the easier cloning, no need to get an USB-SATA adapter. But the manual is a bit confusing. It says it's probably missing the shield, maybe also the M.2 screw.

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namlosh
Feb 11, 2014

I name this haircut "The Sad Rhino".

Klyith posted:

For a Mom PC it doesn't matter at all. If the 2.5" looks like it'll be easier to replace than it would be to get access to the M.2 port, just do that.

Microcenter's house brand Inland makes good inexpensive SSDs. I'd grab this one:

https://www.microcenter.com/product/659869/inland-professional-1tb-ssd-3d-nand-sata-30-6-gbps-25-inch-7mm-internal-solid-state-drive

redeyes posted:

Thats a 'fine' drive. Another decent one is the WD black series (avoid blues).


Saukkis posted:

I think the biggest pro for the M.2 is the easier cloning, no need to get an USB-SATA adapter. But the manual is a bit confusing. It says it's probably missing the shield, maybe also the M.2 screw.

you all rock. thanks so much for the quick response. I've got a usb-sata adapter I can use to do the clone, so I'll just stick with 2.5"

thanks again!

poe meater
Feb 17, 2011
I installed my new M.2 drive and it was quite an ordeal trying to install it without taking off my GPU (which was blocked by the CPU cooler).

I eventually got it installed using a nail clipper as a weight and using my fingers to drop in the screw. Whew!

I tested the speeds using Crystal Disk Mark and it seemed to be just as advertised.

This was the first time I ever checked my drives and I tested my boot drive which uses my 4 year old M.2 NVME. The read speeds seemed fine at around 3000mb/s~ but my write speeds were really slow at around 350-450mb/s.
I have no idea if they were always like this from the start. Never really noticed I guess. :shrug:

SpaceDrake
Dec 22, 2006

I can't avoid filling a game with awful memes, even if I want to. It's in my bones...!
It would be ten times easier to get NVMe drives in if my screws were actually magnetic-capable.

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week

poe meater posted:

This was the first time I ever checked my drives and I tested my boot drive which uses my 4 year old M.2 NVME. The read speeds seemed fine at around 3000mb/s~ but my write speeds were really slow at around 350-450mb/s.
I have no idea if they were always like this from the start. Never really noticed I guess. :shrug:

SSDs get slower after use / being full of data. Random performance and writes are most affected, large sequential reads least.

This is not permanent: you can restore like-new performance by wiping the drive with a secure erase. It's just overhead from fragmentation, write amplification, and maybe less space available for SLC cache depending on drive type.


Good reviews attempt to capture this by filling drives 50% full before running tests, but there's no substitute for a couple years of real use for crapping up a drive.

KinkyJohn
Sep 18, 2002

Are Mushkin Element ssd drives ok to use as backup drives? They're really cheap here, and I've already got all nvme slots filled

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week

KinkyJohn posted:

Are Mushkin Element ssd drives ok to use as backup drives? They're really cheap here, and I've already got all nvme slots filled

Not sure what they are -- on Mushkin's site they say Element is a NVMe drive. Regardless, if it's super cheap (and not just a sale) it's almost certainly QLC and probably slow QLC at that. Possibly also dramless (way worse for sata than nvme because they can't borrow some system memory).


What do you mean by "backup drive"? For actual backups HDDs are still generally better. If I did want a SSD for backups, it would be to dump large images quickly. Cheap QLC drives are not what I'd pick for that since they get real slow when you run out of cache.

But if you just mean a drive for extra space to dump low-priority crap on, then yeah it'd work.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009

Klyith posted:

Possibly also dramless (way worse for sata than nvme because they can't borrow some system memory).

speaking of which i just learned the hard way that it's pretty hard to find an M.2 SATA drive with DRAM now, at least in my market, most of the ol' reliables like the MX500 and 870 EVO aren't made in M.2 form anymore and WD nerfed the blue

the WD red is still good but it's pricey

Rinkles
Oct 24, 2010

What I'm getting at is...
Do you feel the same way?
And apparently the MX500ís DRAM got downgraded

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week

repiv posted:

speaking of which i just learned the hard way that it's pretty hard to find an M.2 SATA drive with DRAM now, at least in my market

M.2 sata is a dying format, it's rare on current-gen motherboards to have a m.2 slot capable of sata.

I would not buy one unless I had a specific need for it, and in that case I'd probably look at ebay. Probably plenty of people who bought them back when they were more of a thing, and are finding they're now worthless.


Rinkles posted:

And apparently the MX500ís DRAM got downgraded

They cut it down to 512mb max, versus the old standard of 1GB ram per TB of drive space.

But TBQH that's not a huge deal. Controllers have gotten smarter at doing more with less DRAM -- take for example the steady rise in performance of DRAMless NVMe drives, which AFAIK never use more than 128MB of system ram. MX500 still a perfectly cromulent drive.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009

Klyith posted:

M.2 sata is a dying format, it's rare on current-gen motherboards to have a m.2 slot capable of sata.

I would not buy one unless I had a specific need for it, and in that case I'd probably look at ebay.

yeah i know, this was for a retrofit of an older machine that only has M.2 SATA

orcane
Jun 13, 2012

Fun Shoe
I'm trying to upgrade my SFF PC from a 2 TB NVMe to a 4 TB one. Since the ITX mainboard only has a single M.2 slot, in previous upgrades I used an enclosure to attach the new bigger disk, cloned everything over then switched the disks.

Even though this worked fine with a different 4 TB disk (WD) in a different PC, apparently the enclosure doesn't work with this particular combination of ancient garbage bridge chip (Jmicron JMS583), mainboard USB 3.0 (AMD B450) and disk (a Firecuda 530). Is there an easy way to "flip" the process and eg. boot into a recovery environment that would let me clone the current disk, attached through the external enclosure, to the empty new disk installed in the NVMe slot? I'm trying to get a different enclosure but all the immediately available ones generally use the same bridge chip so I'm not expecting that would help.

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Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week

orcane posted:

I'm trying to upgrade my SFF PC from a 2 TB NVMe to a 4 TB one. Since the ITX mainboard only has a single M.2 slot, in previous upgrades I used an enclosure to attach the new bigger disk, cloned everything over then switched the disks.

Even though this worked fine with a different 4 TB disk (WD) in a different PC, apparently the enclosure doesn't work with this particular combination of ancient garbage bridge chip (Jmicron JMS583), mainboard USB 3.0 (AMD B450) and disk (a Firecuda 530). Is there an easy way to "flip" the process and eg. boot into a recovery environment that would let me clone the current disk, attached through the external enclosure, to the empty new disk installed in the NVMe slot? I'm trying to get a different enclosure but all the immediately available ones generally use the same bridge chip so I'm not expecting that would help.

Sure.

Most user-friendly way would be to grab the free trail for Macrium and make the bootable WinPE "rescue" media on a USB stick. Macrium's rescue program can do all the basic partition cloning & editing stuff, and I'm pretty sure the WinPE environment will see the USB storage no problem.

You could also use a clonezilla USB boot for a much more nerdy experience.

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