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repiv
Aug 13, 2009



thebigcow posted:

I'm surprised no one sells heat spreader and fan kits for m.2 drives.

http://www.eteknix.com/can-now-watercool-m-2-drives

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repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Crucial M4s also have a "Percent Lifetime Used" metric which is easier to interpret.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



If your drive has two notches you need a SATA adapter, one notch you need a PCIe adapter.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Welp, you're right. That's stupid.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Reviews for Samsungs new OEM drive are appearing now:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/1208...phoenix-3d-nand
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...e-ssd,5323.html

This is probably the performance you can expect from the upcoming 980 EVO.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Naffer posted:

I checked PNY's website and they 1) don't have any firmware for it anymore and 2) don't have software to secure erase it.

You could try manually sending it the ATA Secure Erase command from a Linux environment: https://ata.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/ATA_Secure_Erase

I don't think there's a way to do it from Windows unfortunately.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Intel just launched the 760p series as well: https://www.anandtech.com/show/1234...0p-512gb-review

They're still using 3rd party controllers but performance is a lot better than the 600p, and for slightly less money.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009




nothing some plx switches can't fix

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



redeyes posted:

Does anyone know how to secure erase a SSD (Samsung 830)? Seems like the Partedmagic thing costs money now?

Samsung Magician can create a bootable USB drive for secure erasing their drives.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Rev. Bleech_ posted:

dumb question: I just found out newer BIOS versions of my motherboard (ASUS Z97-K) support NVME. I currently have a Sandisk X400 m2 drive in here. Will updating/wiping/reformatting to use the drive in NVME mode instead of SATA actually net me any real benefit, or am I just better off waiting until the next time I reset/reformat?

That's not how it works, an m.2 drive is either wired for SATA or NVMe. The X400 is a SATA drive so you can only use it in SATA mode.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Samsung just released the 970 EVO and 970 PRO

https://www.anandtech.com/show/1267...0-evo-nvme-ssds
https://www.anandtech.com/show/1267...-evo-ssd-review
https://www.pcper.com/reviews/Stora...NVMe-SSD-Review

repiv fucked around with this message at 15:08 on Apr 24, 2018

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Eletriarnation posted:

Dual heatpipe... for your 70W M.2 drive? How much power is that port even allowed to provide?

I think 10W is the max, with most drives using about 5-6W in practice. Certainly not enough power to justify that... thing.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



The 970 EVO connects to the PCI-Express bus so regardless of where it's installed it won't affect your SATA ports.

Some M.2 drives do connect to SATA though, those are the ones that disable your regular SATA ports.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Kingston put so much RGB on one of their drives that the LEDs make it overheat

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnST5rA64Oc

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



The virtual RAM is probably just there to give developers some wiggle room so running out of physical RAM is a "you dropped a frame" event rather than a "the kernel force killed your game and dumped the player to the dashboard" event.

Requiring developers to stay in physical RAM 99% of the time rather than 100% of the time should make QA/cert testing easier.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Are the drives actually negotiating a gen4 link? I thought gen4 was too finicky to run through risers.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



16 bit signed at that, just in case they needed to store negative hours operated

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



SSDs do wear out as you write data to them, but copying a few hundreds gigs as a one-time thing will barely make a scratch in the lifespan of a modern drive. They are usually rated to endure hundreds of terabytes in writes before dying.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



refleks posted:

Any reason to get M.2 vs. 2.5 SSD. Prices are the same here

Depends on the type of M.2 drive - SATA M.2 drives are functionally equivalent to 2.5" SATA drives, just in a different form factor, but NVME M.2 drives can be significantly faster.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Stickman posted:

Iíd also add that ďcan be significant fasterĒ means faster for very specific workloads. While saturated sequential i/o is potentially several times faster, in most real workloads the performance gain is nothing or just a few percent. Games loading doesnít really get a noticeable boost.

Itís worth checking your typical tasks to see if any of them benefit from NVMe - if not, then itís really not worth paying a premium over SATA.

That's true of today, but ~500MB/sec SATA drives are probably going to show their age in a few years with the new consoles pushing games to design around >2.4GB/sec storage.

YMMV depending on whether you're putting games on the drive and how long you intend to use it though. SATA is absolutely fine for less intensive bulk data storage.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



DrDork posted:

If you mean for the upcoming PS5, it's kinda both: they've added a hardware decompression chip to the SSD, and will be distributing games as pre-packaged compressed blobs.

The decompressor is actually part of the SoC, which pushes performance even higher because the output side isn't bottlenecked by PCIe4.

Sony is claiming 8-9GB/sec typical output after decompression but apparently the theoretical limit is 22GB/sec on trivially compressible data.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Bob Morales posted:

Didn't sandforce do compression with their SSD controllers

They did, but doing it their way means the controller also has to handle compressing the data on-the-fly which is only practical with very simple compression codecs, and you only gain bandwidth, not storage space from the compression. If the data is already compressed, as game data usually is to save space, you gain nothing because the controller can't compress it any more. Plus the decompressed bandwidth is still bottlenecked by SATA/PCIe.

The new consoles require developers to compress their games with the hardware codec ahead-of-time so they can use very strong compressors - the Kraken codec the PS5 uses is nearly as strong as LZMA/7zip.

repiv fucked around with this message at 16:51 on Apr 2, 2020

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Klyith posted:

Hmmm, sounds like patching could be a lot worse though. You'd either have to download full blobs which would suck for people with caps, or decompress and recompress locally.

I would guess they'll probably use an overlay system where the 1.0 gold master blob never changes and patches are a seperate compressed blob off to the side that can override files in the original blob. Last gen they did something similar to patch games running directly from the DVD.

e: or maybe they just won't compress the whole game as one blob, it may be up to the game developers what granularity to compress at

repiv fucked around with this message at 17:55 on Apr 2, 2020

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Seemingly minor changes can have a cascading effect that ends up changing lots of data too - e.g. making a small tweak to a level may require rebaking the lighting, and baking usually isn't deterministic, so the entire dataset ends up being slightly different to before and blows up the patch size.

I've heard some horror stories about accidentally non-deterministic build systems too, like developers who used to compress their textures with a GPU encoder but stopped because the results weren't deterministic across vendors/drivers and kept blowing up the patches even when the input data didn't change.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Sounds like you just want a bog standard 2.5" SATA drive, the Crucial MX500 or WD Blue are good choices.

They're both usually about $50 for 250GB or $70 for 500GB but get whichever is cheaper.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



if only intel had taken the opportunity to standardize modular connectors in the atx12vo spec

maybe in another 20 years

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Shaocaholica posted:

Pretty sure some people were experiencing with film (movie film) to store high density digital data for long term storage that's more robust than magnetic tape or whatever. I think there are some articles/white papers.

That's been commercialised now: https://www.piql.com

GitHub are planning to archive every public repo there so people can rediscover our terrible code in 1000 years.

DrDork posted:

Which is ironic because a lot of older movie film stock is physically degrading and studios are rushing to digitize their older holdings before they're unrecoverable.

Piql are putting a stream of QR codes on the film so in theory it's pretty robust, QR only needs to distinguish black from white and ECC lets it recover even if part of the code is unreadable.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



priznat posted:

Doing hardware compression at the drive level is pretty neat and is already a big thing for video storage. With the complexity of the storage controllers just shoehorning some extra compute power for compression/decompression isnít that much of a heavy lift.

Doing it at the drive level isn't ideal though, since you'd need to shift uncompressed data over PCIe in that case. To match what the consoles are doing we'd need decompression built into the CPU so it can stream compressed data in over PCIe and dump it straight into RAM.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



It's not impossible but standardizing and shipping a compression codec and interface across all NVMe controllers (if drive-side) or Intel and AMD (if cpu-side) is going to take years. Don't hold your breath.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



bold of you to assume it's not a fake rubycon

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



You probably won't notice the speed difference in practice, IMO just keep the 860 until you're ready to move to a larger capacity.

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



redeyes posted:

I had a 850 Evo choke and die. RMA to samsung on year 4 of 5 of waranty. Fuckers sent me back a used 860 Evo. 9TB written out of box. Im not sure how to feel about that.

The 860s have much better endurance ratings (the 1TB went from 150TBW to 600TBW) so you still came out ahead there

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



ijyt posted:

Someone help talk me out of a 1TB 980 Pro over a 2TB SX8200. My brain's still stuck on "but what if consoles will affect PC stuff"

Even if consoles do affect PC stuff, the lowest common denominator is the Xbox Series X with its PCIe 4.0x2 drive

PCIe 4.0x2 is the same speed as PCIe 3.0x4 drives like the SX8200

repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Yep that PC World article says they show up as two drives, each controller is wired to two lanes of the m.2 slot

TIL motherboards just let you bifurcate m.2 slots like that

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repiv
Aug 13, 2009



Plus RAIDing SSDs together will probably do more harm than good in the long term, since DirectStorage probably won't work in that config

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