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orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

What about the new WD Blue they're selling ("WD Blue 3D NAND SATA SSD") that goes up to 2 TB and is slightly more expensive?

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orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

redeyes posted:

Whether or not NVMe is faster for loading x game is irrelevant to the discussion at hand. SATA is old loving tech. NVMe is new tech designed for solid state media. Get on board goons. There are many technical reasons it is a better technology but as with everything, if you don't have bleeding edge bux, feel free to buy older stuff.

The idea that everyone who can afford it should buy NVMe because it's "new tech" is dumb. You buy NVMe because you need/want the performance and are ready to pay for it, whether the tech is new or old is what's irrelevant. Unless someone specifically profits from NVMe speeds or they have a virtually unlimited budget, the money is better spent on larger slower SSDs or a better video card.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

eames posted:

My TLDR compared to the 960: 50% higher write endurance, 5 instead of 3 year warranty and some performance improvements that I would never notice.

But it's new tech so you should get them anyway

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

isndl posted:

Oh, there's no question that it's a better protocol. What I do question is whether it's "a perceivable performance increase [for] day to day stuff", when day to day stuff is not hitting the limits of SATA bandwidth so you're left with latency differences measured in milliseconds.

Maybe they assume the "average" user is unpacking/compressing archives all day.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

In computer terms it's also about a million years old so I'm not sure how that is surprising.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

This obsession with boot times has always been weird to me, when we're comparing systems below the 1 minute mark. Like, everyone was so amazed how much faster Windows 8/10 boots (with fast boot on) than other systems, and now we're talking another few seconds less due to having a NVMe drive or a slightly faster SATA SSD - even if the boot process takes a minute, how often do you reboot your computer that this is a thing people worry about?

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

On a previous computer I had a Gigabyte P45 mainboard which used an ancient firmware for the Intel SATA controller so it would always look for connected devices for almost a minute before letting the computer boot. Luckily by the time I got my first SSD (a 80 GB Intel 320) they had added a BIOS update with a faster firmware that wouldn't make you wait as long

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Sininu posted:

I know that not all m2 slots support NVMe drives, but is there a chance to encounter m2 slots that do suport NVMe but not Sata drives?
Yeah, as an example the Asus Z97-A mainboard's M.2 slot only supports PCIe mode.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

LRADIKAL posted:

In the same topic that people are advised that NVME is a waste of money because no one needs the speed and you can't tell the difference, we're talking about putting aftermarket heat sinks on ssds to improve their benchmark performance. Got it.
That's not really what's being said though

NVMe is not a waste of money *if you need it and you know you need it* and aftermarket heatsinks increase the time a NVMe drive runs without thermal throttling which again, may be important to someone who actually needs NVMe speeds.

You said the heatsinks are a placebo, which technically they're not - but I agree that obviously someone who already won't notice NVMe speeds over SATA is not going to notice a heatsink either. According to reviews a 1 TB WD Black NVMe eg. reads/writes about 400 GB before throttling starts without heatsink, so you need a serious use case for this to justify a heatsink for performance reasons. I guess they look cool?

orcane fucked around with this message at 22:20 on Dec 6, 2018

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Shaocaholica posted:

Thanks. That's really informative but I'm sure there's a lot more to be said. Right now I'm mostly interested in running SATA native(no PATA adapter) SSDs in OS X 10.4 and 10.5.

I thought Win7 didn't have Trim?

And you can't do that fancy partitioning in OS X using CLI tools?

Pretty sure Windows 7 had SSD/TRIM support since release.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Shaocaholica posted:

If memory serves I recall it wasn't added until later and even then it needed to be manually enabled.

e: it's also the dumbest flag/variable with a negate logic.

Is trim enabled? (This is the logical question)

Is disable trim enabled? (This is the actual variable)
https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/e7...d-state-drives/

I remember some SSDs having issues being detected as such and some people trying to check whether the flag was on through third party apps, but Windows 7 could detect SSDs and set certain features to on or off accordingly (requires running the Windows Experience Index?) and personally I never had a modern SSD in Windows 7 that wasn't properly detected and TRIM enabled. Manufacturer apps sometimes had a manual TRIM option on top, though.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Macrium Reflect Free does a good job. I also used Samsung's migration tool in the past, but that only works if the target drive is a Samsung SSD.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Ugly In The Morning posted:

Iím looking for a good 2TB NVMe drive and a good 2TB 2 inch drive. Preferably less than 3 hundo each. Any suggestions?
Adata SX8200 Pro and Crucial MX500.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Nothing stops people from upgrading to something like 4 TB NVMe SSDs in a few years if they become a necessity.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

I love this Linus video so much. Everyone is certain they figured out which is clearly the slowest = SATA SSD

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Some Goon posted:

Nobody knows what the new consoles are cooking up or what impact it will have on PCs, besides pre-release marketing, which is always best taken with a handful of salt. Mise hold off for now.
This but I really can't imagine PC versions of the game relying on the SSD equally, because that would mean targeting an absolutely minimal install base on PC (Intel platforms won't even have PCIe 4.0 for another year or so) and the hardware support the PS5 (at least) is using for on-the-fly compression doesn't even exist in current PC hardware.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

taqueso posted:

Ok, so apocalypse happened. we really need to watch superman though. how do we decode this lost video content. Use a few of the billions of bluray drives and billions of 90% destroyed bluray discs and run a bunch of error correction passes to make sure everything agrees; or do we try to find one of the one known readers of the quartz cube
I'd play this Fallout game.

orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Just triple check every option you select in diskpart

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orcane
Jun 13, 2012



Fun Shoe

Some of these ideas of what an "average user" is doing to their computer seem kind of warped, if I'm looking at these numbers

My system drive that also keeps my currently played open world games and MMOs is a Samsung 860 that has 5.1 TB written after about 10700 power-on hours (about 1.2 years).

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