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Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


is there any actual scientific proof that wrapping your hands offers protection when wearing gloves? because honestly, at least the stuff about it protecting your metacarpal bones or whatever by making your fist more like a solid object(?), seems like total bro science to me.

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Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


02-6611-0142-1 posted:

you sound like a guy who hasnít broken your fingers and wrists a bunch of times

I sound like that guy because I am. It has been years of wearing no wraps and I have never broken my dainty little fingers or my dainty little wrists. Not to say it canít happen to me, but itís not like people who wear wraps never break their hands or wrist right? Is there maybe a study showing that people training with wraps are less likely to break their bones than people who donít wear wraps?

Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


Mechafunkzilla posted:

lmao have you ever actually boxed

no need to be an rear end. just asking a question. I mean, wraps adding some additional wrist support and a little bit more knuckle protection makes sense, but is it really significant when you are wearing gloves with all that padding? then all the stuff about binding the hand protecting all the little bones, that just sounds like pseudo science to me and I haven't been able to find any actually science that would make me think otherwise. I mean, no matter how bound those bones are, the reactive force (newton's third law and all that) is still being applied to all those little bones in your hand correct. even if you bind them, they are still pushing on each other when you punch. I mean I would think that by binding the hand you are actually taking away some of the ability for those bones and the cartilage around them to absorb impact. it all just seems really dogmatic

Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


Mechafunkzilla posted:

The wraps are more about stability than cushion. This is immediately obvious if you've even been properly wrapped. The bones aren't breaking because they're cracking on a hard forehead or whatever -- gloves take care of that just fine -- it's bending and shear forces that create the danger of injury, which wraps help with by making those forces not be isolated against single bones or joints. Wraps also help keep your fist tight and wrist straight, which are important for preventing injury.

You're not going to find, like, a control trial for hand wrap efficiency because doing a study that involves people risking broken bones isn't going to pass any ethics board. And also because who the hell would volunteer to train without wraps.

The idea that there isn't already more than enough people training without wraps to do a study is absurd. Do you think everyone wears a helmet while riding a bike, or a seat belt when driving in a car?



and like I said, I do understand the idea of wraps offering additional wrist support, and its possible that for me maybe, with my very dainty wrists, the support of just gloves is enough. but its this other stuff like this

quote:

which wraps help with by making those forces not be isolated against single bones or joints.

that Im talking about. what does this mean? why do you think there are forces that when unwrapped are isolated only to a single joint or bone, that when wrapped now spread around to multiple joints or bones? I dont understand the science behind this. The force should be spreading or not regardless of your hands being wrapped or not. because your bones are already wrapped in your skin and muscle and bound together by ligaments and tendons, and there is cartilage acting as a cushion between them, right?

Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


02-6611-0142-1 posted:

Have you ever punched a heavy bag at a bad angle, accidentally landed on your pinky and dislocated it? Very difficult to do when wrapped. Isolated fingers vs fingers that you can't separate.

yes, yes, no. and arent your fingers still isolated with wraps? Ive never seen anyone bind their fingers together.

kimbo305 posted:

I honestly think it would be harder to find enough people of the same experience level / attributes to properly stratify the study.
Like past 1 year training of any sport that has full sparring competition, probably 99.9% of people wrap.
true, but I think its probably a little more than 1 in a thousand. out of the ufc's 700+ fighters you can find at least 2 who never use wraps, Wineland as someone mentioned and Gunnar Nelson, who isn't know for his punching power though. But there have to be at least a few more that we just dont know of. And even if it was difficult to find enough people, couldn't you, alternatively, do a different study, say comparing people who wrap their hands one way vs wrapping their hands another? Or comparing different lengths of wraps, or styles (I know they have 'wraps' that are basically just gloves, not sure if many professionals use them). If you find no significant difference, then that doesn't tell you much, but if you find one method of wrapping or length or style does reduce hand injuries, then you've sort of proved that wrapping can be effective.

It just seems crazy to me that millions of people around the world practice sports where wearing wraps is considered the norm, and there seems to be nothing studying their effectiveness.

Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


CommonShore posted:

Think about it this way - you can break one stick with your hands, but if you tape 4 sticks together it's way harder to break them because they're taped together and they support each other. The wraps keep everything in alignment, too.
Yes, but all the bones in your hand are already stuck together.

Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


CommonShore posted:

But you can do what you want. Just note that everyone else in this thread - the experienced people, many of whom have competed, some professionally in striking sports, others who have trained and cornered pro mma fighters and/or worked with people who have fought on pay per views in the UFC - everyone else is unanimous that the wraps make a big difference in preventing injury.
This is true and I agree. While there is no science proving the effectiveness of hand wrapping, there isn't any saying it doesn't work, or that it is worse than not wrapping. So outside of being a lazy contrarian, which I am, there is no reason not to wrap. The worst thing that can happen is that it turns out they really are useless and that your wasting five minutes max every time you train. Just set your alarm 5 minutes earlier, get 5 minutes less sleep, and it will balance out.

CommonShore posted:

Your fingers are out of the way because you're making a fist.
what? why would you not be making a fist? you dont need wraps to make a fist.

CommonShore posted:

More support is more support. Just wiggle your figners around. Your metacarpals can move independently inside your meat.
true, more support is more support. but Im not sure how wrapping your hands up stops the bones from moving around in the meat. if they are moving around in the meat, why wont they move around in the wrap? The meat has been evolving for millions of years to work together with them bones.

Ringo Roadagain fucked around with this message at 05:30 on Mar 13, 2021

Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


Anyway, Ive been browsing the internet in my quest for an answer to my question, and figured I should probably watch some videos of people wrapping their hands since it has been years sine Ive done it and when I did do it it wasn't for a very long time. So one person explained that the reason to wrap your hands is that it helps you make a better fist more easily. And of course, logically, having a better fist would mean a more secure and protected fist. Ill accept this reasoning, because it implies that you can also make this perfect fist without wraps, but wraps just make it much easier. This would explain why some people can not wrap for years (Eddie Wineland, myself) and never break a bone. We just naturally make a very good, very solid fist. I guess it is sort of like how some people just naturally have a strong punch (not me).

Anyway, thank you to everyone who replied to me and helped me in my journey for the truth

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Ringo Roadagain
Mar 27, 2010


kimbo305 posted:

Not for punching, or sitting in office chairs, or dozens of things we do with our bodies now.

I don't agree with that. Most people don't know how to make a fist that's worth punching. Wraps let you hold your hand differently from barehanded and still put the knuckles hard on target.

Yeah that was my point. I was mostly making a joke there.

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