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Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

I'd say that's a Giant Leopard Moth caterpillar.

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poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004






Crow or raven?

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

They look similar enough that it's hard to tell the difference reliably even when you know what they are, but I think this is a crow. Ravens have slightly thicker and more noticeably curved beaks than crows do.

ChubbyChecker
Mar 25, 2018



poverty goat posted:



Crow or raven?

crow

Mak0rz
Aug 2, 2008



poverty goat posted:



Crow or raven?

Small triangular beak and no visible beard. Seems like a crow to me.

Synnr
Dec 29, 2009


i'm in kentucky but I'm unsure where the grocery store (Kroger) sources it's herbs. They just mention packaging in cincinnati I think on the box. It isn't really helpful, I know. Sorry.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Synnr posted:

i'm in kentucky but I'm unsure where the grocery store (Kroger) sources it's herbs. They just mention packaging in cincinnati I think on the box. It isn't really helpful, I know. Sorry.
Does Kroger not put that on packing material somewhere? Where I live, all stores have to do that. Maybe you could try looking.

I've been googling around a little, but I haven't finding many good results. Have you considered just putting in a box somewhere and seeing it might end up hatching? I'm kinda curious myself now. It's likely to be some sort of lepidopteran, going the placement and the shape, although it's a bit unusual to see only one egg placed there.

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004




Cardiovorax posted:

They look similar enough that it's hard to tell the difference reliably even when you know what they are, but I think this is a crow. Ravens have slightly thicker and more noticeably curved beaks than crows do.

this is how I was leaning but if so there are some bigass crows around here and it's rare to see more than 2-3 of them hanging out together, which is pretty raveny as I understand. that one that shows up at my birdfeeder from time to time always has a mate nearby and that's it.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

poverty goat posted:

this is how I was leaning but if so there are some bigass crows around here and it's rare to see more than 2-3 of them hanging out together, which is pretty raveny as I understand. that one that shows up at my birdfeeder from time to time always has a mate nearby and that's it.
Crows are semi-solitary in behaviour, meaning that while they can tolerate or even seek out the presence of other crows, they don't necessarily live in flocks. It's just that they tend to aggregate around where the food is, which can look like the same thing, but it's not a persistent social group. Solitary crows aren't usual. Still, it could really be both. The shot isn't that good and it does look kind of bulky. It's hard to tell.

The Red Queen
Jan 20, 2007

You tricked me!

You said dis place was fun, but it ain't!

I knew the egg looked familiar, and I think it's because I've seen leaf footed bug eggs that look like it, which bug guide seems to agree with although they can't narrow it down (there's something like 2K in the family):

https://bugguide.net/node/view/529666/bgpage

CaptainSarcastic
Jul 6, 2013

HAIL SATAN



poverty goat posted:

this is how I was leaning but if so there are some bigass crows around here and it's rare to see more than 2-3 of them hanging out together, which is pretty raveny as I understand. that one that shows up at my birdfeeder from time to time always has a mate nearby and that's it.

I'd say crow, too. Crows tend to hang out in family units, so a mated pair together the most and kids and related crows overlapping sometimes. I usually see pairs, with others showing up from time to time. Scrub jays often follow a similar pattern, and I think Steller's jays do, too.

Synnr
Dec 29, 2009


Cardiovorax posted:

Does Kroger not put that on packing material somewhere? Where I live, all stores have to do that. Maybe you could try looking.

I've been googling around a little, but I haven't finding many good results. Have you considered just putting in a box somewhere and seeing it might end up hatching? I'm kinda curious myself now. It's likely to be some sort of lepidopteran, going the placement and the shape, although it's a bit unusual to see only one egg placed there.

Yeeeeaaah I was a little confused by the "packed in" instead of "from" bit as well.

Edit: it's from Colombia it looks like.

The Red Queen posted:

I knew the egg looked familiar, and I think it's because I've seen leaf footed bug eggs that look like it, which bug guide seems to agree with although they can't narrow it down (there's something like 2K in the family):

https://bugguide.net/node/view/529666/bgpage

Well, that's just a lovely little bug. Thank you!

Synnr fucked around with this message at 23:20 on Feb 23, 2021

Chinston Wurchill
Jun 27, 2010

It's not that kind of test.

I found this flicker sleeping in my yard.



He's sleeping, right?



It was pretty far from the house and there was no mark on the window so I hope it wasn't a window strike, though I'm not sure what else would have happened.

In happier news, I spotted porcupines a few times over the winter.



One time I came up behind one on the path and it awkwardly slid down an embankment to escape. What adorable creatures!

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Chinston Wurchill posted:

It was pretty far from the house and there was no mark on the window so I hope it wasn't a window strike, though I'm not sure what else would have happened.
Could've been a drop from a raptor, they do that sometimes. Picked it awkwardly out of the air and then lost hold of it. I found a rat in my garden once that was almost the size of a muskrat. No way a cat left that there, but it certainly didn't just suddenly keel over from a heart attack, either. Another time it was a pretty big fish, that was likely from the nearby herons that do fly-overs every so often.

Chinston Wurchill posted:

One time I came up behind one on the path and it awkwardly slid down an embankment to escape. What adorable creatures!
Porcupines are so cute and badly coordinated, it's equal parts hilarious and adorable.

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004




I didn't want to spook them for a pic because they seemed to be having a good time but I figured out what my big corvid (e: autocorrected to covid lol) friends like to eat for breakfast

Stickman
Feb 1, 2004

much, much larger than your hat, but not as large as the moon
-DNA




(O'ahu) About the size of a fingernail. Hangs out in a tuft of grass in the large pen where my landlady's guard puppy lives and gets annoyed when I spray it out. Fortunately, the bulbuls can't pick it off the wall!

ID: Greenhouse frog

Stickman fucked around with this message at 06:34 on Mar 8, 2021

Lord Zedd-Repulsa
Jul 21, 2007

Devour a good book.



What an adorable little dude.

Chinston Wurchill
Jun 27, 2010

It's not that kind of test.

Nothing too exciting lately, but here are a couple terrible cell phone pics of birds:



American three-toed woodpecker - haven't seen one here before, so that was neat.



Peregrine falcon which was shortly thereafter scared away by the local magpies.

vortmax
Sep 24, 2008


vorticity (n):
A measure of the local rotation in a fluid flow. In weather analysis and forecasting, it usually refers to the vertical component of rotation and is used most often in reference to synoptic scale or mesoscale weather systems.


Pillbug

Friends I need help identifying this feather. I've never seen one of these in central Arkansas until now.

Slo-Tek
Jun 8, 2001

WINDOWS 98 BEAT HIS FRIEND WITH A SHOVEL

vortmax posted:

Friends I need help identifying this feather. I've never seen one of these in central Arkansas until now.



I thought to myself "man, those shafts are yellow, wonder what a yellow shafted flicker feather looks like".

Turns out, that is a yellow shafted flicker feather, I think.

Stickman
Feb 1, 2004

much, much larger than your hat, but not as large as the moon
-DNA


That's an awesome feather! It looks like a Yellow-Shafted Northern Flicker secondary? I had no idea FWS had an online feather atlas!


sexy tiger boobs
Aug 23, 2002

Up shit creek with a turd for a paddle.



Definitely flicker feather, we only have the red shafted out this a way but it's the same concept.

vortmax
Sep 24, 2008


vorticity (n):
A measure of the local rotation in a fluid flow. In weather analysis and forecasting, it usually refers to the vertical component of rotation and is used most often in reference to synoptic scale or mesoscale weather systems.


Pillbug

Thanks! It's extremely pretty. I'll keep an eye out for the bird.

Cythereal
Nov 8, 2009



vortmax posted:

Thanks! It's extremely pretty. I'll keep an eye out for the bird.

Flickers are woodpeckers, so you'll probably hear them first.

Mak0rz
Aug 2, 2008



Cythereal posted:

Flickers are woodpeckers, so you'll probably hear them first.

I don't know if I've ever heard them pecking. I think flickers tend to forage on the ground and usually only bore into wood to make nesting sites.

Regardless what you said is still true because they have a pretty unmistakable call!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4EQeJBQH1nk

BetterLekNextTime
Jul 22, 2008

It's all a matter of perspective...


Grimey Drawer

Not sure about Arkansas but many populations are at least partially migratory so they may be a lot easier to find for you in the fall and winter compared to spring/summer.

CaptainSarcastic
Jul 6, 2013

HAIL SATAN



Mak0rz posted:

I don't know if I've ever heard them pecking.

I'm not sure if it counts, but just yesterday the flickers here started their yearly ritual of pecking the poo poo out of the plumbing vents on my roof presumably as a mating ritual. Last year I thought an inconsiderate neighbor was using an air ratchet at odd intervals until I finally figured out it was the birds.

They're really pretty (these would be northern flickers) but holy hell they can make noise.

Tangentially, I also figured that the flickers in my neighborhood, or at least one of them, makes a call that sounds like a small hawk - it's weird seeing a woodpeckery bird making a bird of prey sounding noise.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

I've got a Green Earth Woodpecker here that comes by regularly (instead of pecking holes into trees they peck holes into the ground) and its call sounds like a tropical bird of some sort. Every time I hear it, I go "what is that thing" for a moment before I remember it's a woodpecker. You know that ululating bird cry that movies play in every jungle scene ever? That's exactly what they sound like, so I supposed it might be a really multi-layered case of misinformation in media and they actually do play a woodpecker call in those scenes because that's what people have come to expect.

Cythereal
Nov 8, 2009



Cardiovorax posted:

I've got a Green Earth Woodpecker here that comes by regularly (instead of pecking holes into trees they peck holes into the ground) and its call sounds like a tropical bird of some sort. Every time I hear it, I go "what is that thing" for a moment before I remember it's a woodpecker. You know that ululating bird cry that movies play in every jungle scene ever? That's exactly what they sound like, so I supposed it might be a really multi-layered case of misinformation in media and they actually do play a woodpecker call in those scenes because that's what people have come to expect.

Fun fact, one of the most popular bird cries to use in movies with jungle scenes isn't a jungle bird at all but a common wetland bird of the American tropics.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Doesn't surprise me. They don't sound anything like that, though. Less rasping, more of a very smooth 'oolooloolooloo' cry.

Mak0rz
Aug 2, 2008



CaptainSarcastic posted:

I'm not sure if it counts, but just yesterday the flickers here started their yearly ritual of pecking the poo poo out of the plumbing vents on my roof presumably as a mating ritual. Last year I thought an inconsiderate neighbor was using an air ratchet at odd intervals until I finally figured out it was the birds.

This is known as "drumming":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxre6H2l4-I

Which I guess qualifies as "pecking" yeah. They'll do it on stuff like vent covers and other makeshift resonators because they're nice and loud. Probably not as distinctive as a woodpecker boring for grubs and they likely only do it during certain times of the year.

Anyway I stand corrected. You are likely to hear a flicker before seeing one.

Captain Invictus
Apr 5, 2005


Clever Betty

this robin was near my driveway, seemed to have just dropped dead shortly before I went out there since it wasn't stiff or anything. No signs of injury or anything, just ragdolled. Looks well, looked healthy, too. Not sure how it died. Aneurysm, maybe?

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Birds don't really get those, they don't live long enough for the blockage to build up. Same reason short-lived animals don't have strokes - it's an age-related disease. There's some fairly interesting science behind that.

I'm guessing either disease or it was dropped by a predator. I'd ask you if the neck feels wobbly or broken, which is a good hint that a cat got to it, but I'm sure you'd rather not check.

Captain Invictus
Apr 5, 2005


Clever Betty

I just thought of something, it was off to the side of the driveway, near my car. It's possible it might've flown into the window and snapped its neck and bounced off onto the nearby lawn, and that's why there's no sign of a predator injuring it.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






This might be worth checking
https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/dead-birds/index.html

Obviously there's lots of diseases that can kill a bird but west nile is one and avian flu is another, and some states would like you to report dead birds if they're trying to collect or screen for where the viruses are active.

bij
Feb 24, 2007



Spotted this handsome gentleman when I walked into work this morning. He's out and about pretty early!



I'm pretty sure it's a male from the fabulous antennae.

Captain Invictus
Apr 5, 2005


Clever Betty

Leperflesh posted:

This might be worth checking
https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/dead-birds/index.html

Obviously there's lots of diseases that can kill a bird but west nile is one and avian flu is another, and some states would like you to report dead birds if they're trying to collect or screen for where the viruses are active.
Good to know for future reference. it looked really healthy physically, no ratty feathers or bald spots or anything, so hopefully it's the car window thing and not some disease.

Slo-Tek
Jun 8, 2001

WINDOWS 98 BEAT HIS FRIEND WITH A SHOVEL

bij posted:

Spotted this handsome gentleman when I walked into work this morning. He's out and about pretty early!



I'm pretty sure it's a male from the fabulous antennae.

Yup, also, fun thing about Actias luna. The diapausing brood, the one that sits in their cocoons over the winter has much more saturated color, and maroon coloration on the wing edges. The ones that live their entire life cycle over the summer are much lighter colored, with nearly translucent light green wings, and brown or yellow or no color on the wing edges.

Think I saw a Tri-colored bat stuck to a tree today.



MrYenko
Jun 17, 2012

#2 isn't ALWAYS bad...


HES SO FUZZY

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Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

I found a little guy like that with his wing stuck in a gap outside my window once. I managed to pry him out and tried to give him water, but sadly he didn't make it.

They are exactly as soft to the touch as they look. No idea how anyone can hate the little guys.

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