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MacheteZombie
Feb 4, 2007

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!

I could help but laugh at her bing search, it was dead quiet in the theater during that part except for my chuckles.


The sound in this movie was amazing.

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Shadowhand00
Jan 22, 2006

Golden Bear is ever watching; day by day he prowls, and when he hears the tread of lowly Stanfurd red,from his Lair he fiercely growls.

Toilet Rascal

Groovelord Neato posted:

dude how


it really doesn't.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRfnevzM9kQ

I'd say it kinda does. But only because we have context for the movie now.

MisterBibs
Jul 17, 2010

dolla dolla
bill y'all


Fun Shoe

Was anyone else expecting, at the very end, that Rose was going to get up or regain control of the shotgun while the two guys were talking in the car? I mean, I was laughing at the dialogue, but I was worried that it was going to take a last minute punishment for doing so.

Tyberius
Oct 21, 2006

MACE TO THE FACE!


MisterBibs posted:

Was anyone else expecting, at the very end, that Rose was going to get up or regain control of the shotgun while the two guys were talking in the car? I mean, I was laughing at the dialogue, but I was worried that it was going to take a last minute punishment for doing so.

I'm just mad that they didn't run her over with the car before leaving to make sure she stays dead like her brother.

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

MisterBibs posted:

Was anyone else expecting, at the very end, that Rose was going to get up or regain control of the shotgun while the two guys were talking in the car? I mean, I was laughing at the dialogue, but I was worried that it was going to take a last minute punishment for doing so.

Speaking as a ~cis white male~, I was actually satisfied by her expression being one of utter shock and disbelief that she *wasn't* going to get her revenge. It managed to be a 'happy ending' that by all rights would have mind-hosed him forever afterwards. The closest thing I could approximate to a similar ending was the end of the first Final Destination movie.

Shimrra Jamaane
Aug 9, 2007

THE CENTRIST DEFENDER HAS LOGGED ON


lol Armond White wrote a negative review for the National loving Review.

Seeing this tomorrow, can't wait!

Acebuckeye13
Nov 2, 2010

There's only one prescription for Nazism and it's 76mm HVAP


Ultra Carp

MisterBibs posted:

Was anyone else expecting, at the very end, that Rose was going to get up or regain control of the shotgun while the two guys were talking in the car? I mean, I was laughing at the dialogue, but I was worried that it was going to take a last minute punishment for doing so.

If there was going to be a twist ending, I was expecting it to go like Brazil, where the entire last act had only taken place inside Chris's head, and that his imagined escape was merely a part of the hypnotic conditioning.

Suffice it to say, I'm glad they didn't go down that route.

MisterBibs
Jul 17, 2010

dolla dolla
bill y'all


Fun Shoe

BIG HEADLINE posted:

Speaking as a ~cis white male~, I was actually satisfied by her expression being one of utter shock and disbelief that she *wasn't* going to get her revenge..

I did too; I thought it was an interesting thing that he let someone to die, alone, after admitting he had intense guilt for not doing that earlier in his life.

VROOM VROOM
Jun 8, 2005

goongratulations to forum user vroom vroom for winning the avatar contest. his casual confidence in easily claiming the twenty-first post is an inspiration to myself and others. warmest regards, wolfsheim




MisterBibs posted:

Was anyone else expecting, at the very end, that Rose was going to get up or regain control of the shotgun while the two guys were talking in the car? I mean, I was laughing at the dialogue, but I was worried that it was going to take a last minute punishment for doing so.

I would have, except I had faith that the film was executing the cosmic justice of her being left to die after he had confided in her about him feeling like he had left his mother to die.

e: I see you had the same idea, but I hope you have no confusion about why he did that. The first time was his mother, and the second, well.

Xander B Coolridge
Sep 2, 2011


MisterBibs posted:

I did too; I thought it was an interesting thing that he let someone to die, alone, after admitting he had intense guilt for not doing that earlier in his life.

In hindsight this also explains the deer scene and his nightmare about it

My friend pointed out that he saves himself by picking cotton - from the chair .

Hooooly poo poo

Blisster
Mar 10, 2010

What you are listening to are musicians performing psychedelic music under the influence of a mind altering chemical called...

VROOM VROOM posted:

I would have, except I had faith that the film was executing the cosmic justice of her being left to die after he had confided in her about him feeling like he had left his mother to die.

e: I see you had the same idea, but I hope you have no confusion about why he did that. The first time was his mother, and the second, well.

Another thing from his past that's reflected in the movie is his fate if he doesn't GET OUT. He'll essentially be stuck forever in the worst day of his life- the day he couldn't move. Watching TV, paralyzed, forever. As if it wasn't horrible enough, it's like his own personal hell.

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


Xander B Coolridge posted:

In hindsight this also explains the deer scene and his nightmare about it

My friend pointed out that he saves himself by picking cotton - from the chair .

Hooooly poo poo

Yeah that detail was great

Drunkboxer
Jun 30, 2007



Stephen Roots good at playing blind guys

Groovelord Neato
Dec 6, 2014


Shadowhand00 posted:

I'd say it kinda does. But only because we have context for the movie now.

the trailer gives the impression that they're making slaves out of people via brainwashing. this isn't the case. it doesn't really count as giving too much away when you have to see the movie to say that.

MisterBibs posted:

Was anyone else expecting, at the very end, that Rose was going to get up or regain control of the shotgun while the two guys were talking in the car? I mean, I was laughing at the dialogue, but I was worried that it was going to take a last minute punishment for doing so.

they literally show her die laying there so no. do a lot of goons just not pay attention you see her die, she stops moving and breathing.

Groovelord Neato fucked around with this message at Feb 26, 2017 around 15:14

weekly font
Dec 1, 2004


Everytime I try to fly I fall
Without my wings
I feel so small
Guess I need you baby...



Groovelord Neato posted:


they literally show her die laying there so no. do a lot of goons just not pay attention you see her die, she stops moving and breathing.

Goons never loving pay attention, but it's usually restrained to TVIV

MisterBibs
Jul 17, 2010

dolla dolla
bill y'all


Fun Shoe

Groovelord Neato posted:

they literally show her die laying there so no. do a lot of goons just not pay attention you see her die, she stops moving and breathing.

You have an incorrect memory of the timeline of events. She doesn't finally die until they drive away and the music starts playing.

Before that, when the two characters are in the car, with the comic relief explaining how he should've never gotten into this in the first place, she's still alive, and for most of the conversation, they are looking at each other, and not the still-kinda-alive crazy lady that the main character just slid the rifle a few inches away from.

MisterBibs fucked around with this message at Feb 26, 2017 around 17:13

Ape Agitator
Feb 19, 2004

Soylent Green is Monkeys

College Slice

Blisster posted:

Another thing from his past that's reflected in the movie is his fate if he doesn't GET OUT. He'll essentially be stuck forever in the worst day of his life- the day he couldn't move. Watching TV, paralyzed, forever. As if it wasn't horrible enough, it's like his own personal hell.

drat, I didn't realize that visual linkage. Great catch.

Groovelord Neato
Dec 6, 2014


MisterBibs posted:

You have an incorrect memory of the timeline of events. She doesn't finally die until they drive away and the music starts playing.

Before that, when the two characters are in the car, with the comic relief explaining how he should've never gotten into this in the first place, she's still alive, and for most of the conversation, they are looking at each other, and not the still-kinda-alive crazy lady that the main character just slid the rifle a few inches away from.

cuz she can't move and is dead and even if she's not dead she does not have the physical power to hold the gun or to stand up and shoot them and also because they already did "the person who thought died came back" and it'd be lame as hell to do it again.

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Drunkboxer posted:

Stephen Roots good at playing blind guys

He really is.

MisterBibs
Jul 17, 2010

dolla dolla
bill y'all


Fun Shoe

Groovelord Neato posted:

cuz she can't move and is dead


Again, you are factually incorrect: she's not dead until the car drives away. We know she's still alive when they are having their conversation.

Groovelord Neato posted:

because they already did "the person who thought died came back" and it'd be lame as hell to do it again.

I'm not saying it would've been a good thing to do - it would've been dark as hell - but I was worrying that the movie was going to take that dark turn.

Mr Ice Cream Glove
Apr 22, 2007
"If you put a hamburger in the toaster it'll say Happy Birthday."

Armond Whites review is batshit insane

quote:

But unlike Eddie Murphy, a masterful actor with a mature sense of humor, Peele fails because has not created credible characters. Chris and his ghetto friend Rod (Lil Rel Howery), who works for the TSA, are attitudes, not complex beings. The other blacks Chris encounters as servants on Rose’s family estate are no better than Trayvon Martin–type effigies — zombie-like when not sorrowful and tearful. Exploiting black people’s tears, paranoia, and pain without providing reflex is offensive.

Get Out is an attenuated comedy sketch in which serious concerns are debased. Pushing buttons that alarm blacks yet charm white liberals, Peele manipulates the Trayvon Martin myth the same way Obama himself did when he pandered by saying, “Trayvon Martin could have been my son.” That disingenuous tease is extended in Peele’s casting of Daniel Kaluuya. Son of Ugandan parents, the handsome, round-faced, British-born actor triggers sympathy (he has the young, clean-cut buppie co-ed look that brothers Branford and Wynton Marsalis rocked in the ’80s).

Also it looks like this film will be number 1 in box office.

Benny the Snake
Apr 10, 2012

Whose kitty litter did I shit in?


Something I thought of...if the procedure leaves the victims vunerable to flashing lights, wouldn't the last thing Stephen Root's character want to get back into is photography? It's kinda if a beekeeper were offered a life-saving procedure where the side effect would be a massive bee allegy, it doesn't make sense.

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


"chris's ghetto friend"

Good Will Hrunting
Oct 8, 2012

Fly on these secondhand wings
Willing to find out
What impossible means
I'll climb through the ladder
On feathers and dreams


Benny the Snake posted:

Something I thought of...if the procedure leaves the victims vunerable to flashing lights, wouldn't the last thing Stephen Root's character want to get back into is photography? It's kinda if a beekeeper were offered a life-saving procedure where the side effect would be a massive bee allegy, it doesn't make sense.

I didn't take his comments to be about getting into photography at all. I took them to be on a more philosophical level, like he would have eyes and a brain to see things the way Chris did

DC Murderverse
Nov 10, 2016

"Tell that to Zod's snapped neck!"


Benny the Snake posted:

Something I thought of...if the procedure leaves the victims vunerable to flashing lights, wouldn't the last thing Stephen Root's character want to get back into is photography? It's kinda if a beekeeper were offered a life-saving procedure where the side effect would be a massive bee allegy, it doesn't make sense.

He doesn't want to get back into photography necessarily, but he'd like to be able to appreciate visual art on the level he once did. The movie does a great job of building up sympathy for him when he and Chris are talking at the party and then ruining that when you figure out what's going on.

He's a great representative of people who intellectually understand what racism is and can point it out, but also have absolutely no interest in actually fighting it, and will happily contribute to racism in society if it benefits themselves. He gets to say "yeah these people are hosed up and racist" and then directly benefit from said hosed up racism. IMO he's the best criticism of liberal race relations, because there are a lot of people who are at that point; "racism is terrible, but hey, what can I do?"


edit: also, as a more general rule, more movies should have Stephen Root in them. It's easy to forget that he's actually an incredibly talented actor because 90% of the time he's playing a really goofy character, but he can pull off roles like this in his sleep.

DC Murderverse fucked around with this message at Feb 26, 2017 around 22:32

Adonis
Oct 15, 2004
Greek gods almighty!

R. Guyovich posted:

the best aspect of the "twist" or whatever you wanna call it is that zombie-like behavior wasn't the result of brainwashing or lobotomy but instead the normal-rear end mannerisms of old white assholes

I think there's more to it than that. Like they acted strange but not just in an old white people way. As though the brain transplant messed something up in them and wasn't a complete success. At least that was the impression I got.

Adonis fucked around with this message at Feb 26, 2017 around 22:37

DC Murderverse
Nov 10, 2016

"Tell that to Zod's snapped neck!"


Adonis posted:

I think there's more to it than that. Like they acted strange and not just in an old white people way. As though the brain transplant messed something up in them and wasn't a complete success. At least that was the impression I got.

They also had to hide the fact that they are actually old white people in black bodies from Chris, so there's an additional element of deception. They're old white people pretending that they're not old white people while still attempting to "class up" being black.

All of a sudden I remember the conversation Chris had with Grandpa Handyman and it makes his comment about how pretty Rose is feel a lot less creepy. It's one thing if the handyman has a weird little crush on the girl whose house he keeps, but it's another when it's just a grandpa talking up how nice his daughter is (to the man his son is about to abduct the brain of).

InequalityGodzilla
May 31, 2012



Mr Ice Cream Glove posted:

Armond Whites review is batshit insane


Also it looks like this film will be number 1 in box office.
I feel like my instinctual reaction to that should be but mostly I'm feeling like "what the gently caress is he even talking about?" The servants are Trayvon Martin-esque in that they're...zombie-like? And he brings up the Obama's comment about Martin could have been his son? How is that even tangentially related?
Did...did White accidentally walk into a different movie and then just try to write review based on what he actually saw?

Echo Chamber
Oct 16, 2008

best username/post combo

Anyone else thought of Ben Carson by the end of the movie?

precision
May 7, 2006

Gonna have me some good friends around
Gonna have me some good times in town


Armond White gave a favorable review to Assassin's Creed and complained that the new XXX movie didn't have enough political commentary. Any time he's written a good review has probably been an accident. They're all nonsense. In the AssCreed review he even seemed to not know that "Nothing is true. Everything is permitted" is a famous quote from Hassan i Sabbah (or at least a famous quote used in Naked Lunch) and instead refers to it as "Nietzschean".

DC Murderverse
Nov 10, 2016

"Tell that to Zod's snapped neck!"


Armond White's review of 13th, presented in its entirety:

quote:

A New documentary reveals the black bourgeoisie’s political correctness.

Would W. E. B. DuBois, the prophetic sociologist, author, and negro activist of the last century, approve of the instantly celebrated race documentary titled “The 13th”? Director Ava DuVernay’s nonfiction film interprets the Constitution’s 13th Amendment, which officially abolished slavery, as a political sham; then she shifts to an extended, jumbled alarum about what’s called the Prison Industrial Complex (PIC). The film ignores black American uplift (DuBois’s great concern) for the currently fashionable appeal of “protest,” a term that patronizing news media always preface with “peaceful” — sanctioning it as synonymous with uplift.

But DuVernay’s thesis nose-dives. She glosses over the painful course of African-American history from slavery to segregation, from integration to pride, and on to endless, inescapable oppression.

This de-evolution of an American populace could make a fascinating film subject, but it would have to be proved — not just asserted — and The 13th isn’t that film. DuVernay, a former publicist who now directs movies with a publicist’s regard for exploitation over explication, is better at marketing concepts than she is at expressing ideas or feelings. Her previous film, Selma, about the 1965 civil-rights march in Alabama, was a similarly oversimplified Martin Luther King biography rather than a history of a movement. The 13th also slights both the 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act, then castigates American racism, with none of DuBois’s rhetorical specificity, elegance, or intellectual rigor.

A product of disastrously confused times, The 13th shows DuVernay’s trendy infatuation with the black civil-rights past. Her argument doesn’t aim toward the kind of enlightenment DuBois envisioned, according to which our moral and political understanding would allow us to overcome America’s slavery-based heritage. Instead, DuVernay demonstrates a perverse nostalgia for the torment and anguish that accompanied mid-century civil-rights activism. She rolls through history, drawing quick, superficial parallels between recent racial events (Ferguson, Baltimore) and past civil-rights milestones. Her implicit message: Nothing has changed. But this insults history and misrepresents black Americans’ spiritual, ethical, and economic drive.

The 13th proposes that through a century of political U-turns, blacks have endured sociological stasis. Her facile accusations and observations (the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, Bill Clinton’s 1994 Omnibus Crime Bill) evince mere pity for black America. Never confronting the Left-Behinds, the film neglects a critique of poverty and disregards the cultural and psychological phenomenon of racism. It follows the news media’s typically unhelpful assumption that contemporary racial issues can be approached in the same way as racism of the past.

DuVernay accepts the sophomoric term “institutional racism” as a catch-all for the complexity of U.S. society, industry, culture, and personal relations. She appropriates images of southern black pacifism and stoicism against thuggish white mobs as if by doing so, she is demonstrating the same courage and nobility. But she is no more noble than contemporary activists who let the principles of black advancement be overtaken by anarchists and lowlifes (the new mobs), or today’s craven media who exploit unrest for ratings and clicks.

In assembling a peculiar ensemble of characters, DuVernay disgraces the legacy of DuBois’s tough thinking. Of the people she spotlights, only a few actually suffered convictions such as those we saw in The Return, the documentary by Kelly Duane de la Vega and Katie Holloway, which followed efforts by working-class ex-cons to mend their lives after surviving the dehumanization of imprisonment. DuVernay gives more screen time to an aristocratic group of black achievers and spokespeople: Van Jones, Henry Louis Gates, Michele Alexander, Cory Booker, Khalil Muhammad, and others — all pontificating while looking glamorous and peering thoughtfully off-screen).

DuVernay demonstrates a perverse nostalgia for the torment and anguish that accompanied mid-century civil-rights activism. How ironic that DuVernay’s “experts” — post-civil-rights patricians and quislings — exemplify the group that DuBois labeled “the Talented Tenth.” In a 1903 essay, DuBois predicted a class of educated blacks — one out of ten — who he dreamed would help lead their fellows out of post-slavery misery. More than a century later, the black educated caste (professors, pundits, foundation-funded “activists”), bolstered by the privileges of academia and the media, are an embarrassment to DuBois’s prophecy. These select few have hijacked the grievances of the less-successful to justify their own protected professional standing and to broadcast their individual resentments as if grinding the axes of the masses.

The 13th is full of accusations by opportunists-posing-as-historians who profit from reinforcing the fear that black Americans by and large have not experienced progress. There’s such a serious lack of political sophistication that DuVernay never confronts the welfare state as enslavement. She picks apart the American Legislative Exchange Council but fails to examine its counterpart, the Service Employees International Union. Her PIC pretext depends on the false assumption that the economic and political issues of the 21st century are exactly like those of the past. This becomes insupportable when Duvernay perpetuates the canard that the circumstances of Trayvon Martin’s death are equivalent to the circumstances of Emmitt Till’s killing. The emotional pain of these completely different events has moved many people to favor their dismay over the facts. Thus, DuVernay’s mashes together Jim Crow, PIC, Black Lives Matter, and police brutality. If all these calamities are the same, then none of them have particulars that a historian — or a real-life, suffering witness — might truly respect or learn from.

The use of newsreel and video montages to link Millennial race turmoil with the fight for freedom that was waged more than 50 years ago denies what separates contemporary law-breakers (Michael Brown, Eric Garner) from their dignified, victimized ancestors; it misses the opportunity for a more complicated, less self-satisfied DuBoisian examination.

As she did in Selma, DuVernay piles on tragedy, guilt, and abhorrence. She follows Spike Lee’s method of throwing in every grievance she can think of, every offense she has stored up. Black American history as Bamboozled II. From Fred Hampton to the miscreant Freddie Gray, DuVernay trots out a motley troupe of undifferentiated fatalities; her haphazard technique makes Angela Davis’s comment that “reform inevitably leads to more repression” sound unreasonable. (Convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu Jamal must be lost on DuVernay’s hard drive — or else his once-sacred position in modern protest lore has been usurped by Trayvon Martin–inspired sentimentality.) When DuVernay invokes cheerleaders Rachel Maddow and John Oliver, The 13th hits the bottom of the barrel.

The 13th could be the recruiting film Black Lives Matters has not managed to produce on its own. DuVernay borrows BLM’s shallow perspective and lack of consequence, as well as its progressive jargon — academic persiflage about “the black body,” leading to the repetitive motif of the word “CRIMINAL” flashing on screen. This fundamentally confuses social prohibition with cultural demonization. That graphic word-image is underscored with anxious, angry-sounding hip-hop music to give it unearned emotional weight. It’s cheap bombast because DuVernay uses utterly mediocre, didactic hip-hop, often the uninspiring, doggerel-prone rapper Common.

Here’s the Talented Tenth’s 21st-century iteration (and alienation) that is overlooked in Duvernay’s bourgie approach: the great Houston rap group Geto Boys. Their rough-spoken, bluesy, and magnificent 1995 album The Resurrection takes DuBois’s prediction and spins it: “By the year 2015 they gonna have 70% of our community locked-up. . . . It’s gonna be like Warsaw. Ghetto.” But the Geto Boys went beyond simply exaggerating and griping about incarceration; they dealt with the corruption affecting the Clinton-era black urban mindset and carried the voice of the Left-Behinds. The Resurrection’s opening track, “Still,” was a stunning and profane declaration against the insidious persistence of deprivation and racism — black outrage turned in on itself and thus exposing the range of America’s human tragedy — treating it as, well, black humor. Geto Boys examined their own lethal desperation and rethought the sentimentalizing of civil-rights politics. This was long before DuVernay’s Talented Tenth of black academia — and Hollywood — discovered guilt, horror, and blame and capitalized on them as the new social consciousness. Great art like Geto Boys’ The Resurrection goes deep; this facile documentary doesn’t.

-----

About precedents: The 13th was chosen as the opening-night event of the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s New York Film Festival. It is the first documentary ever accorded that prestigious position, breaking precedent with the festival’s 53-year emphasis on narrative fiction. It’s perverse, given that DuVernay’s film blames The Birth of a Nation, D. W. Griffith’s 1915 masterpiece, for setting new precedents in racism — an insultingly glib defamation for a venerable film institution to sponsor. One of DuVernay’s talking heads blathers about a “search for the medium of technology that will confirm your experience such that your basic humanity can be recognized.” If The 13th is payback, it isn’t good enough to answer Griffith’s flawed genius. But black-and-white cookies were served at the opening-night party.

Maxwell Lord
Dec 12, 2008

I am drowning.
There is no sign of land.
You are coming down with me, hand in unlovable hand.

And I hope you die.

I hope we both die.




Grimey Drawer

Yeah, so Armond White is a Respectability Politics, "Welfare state is slavery!" conservative, and THAT'S why he's writing for NR.

Good to know.

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

It's kind of amusing to read that review in Uncle Ruckus' voice.

InequalityGodzilla
May 31, 2012




Oooooooh. So it's not that there was some deeper connection that I was missing, it's that Armond White is a moron.

I get it now.

Edit: I kinda want to hate read some more of his stuff now.

SpiderHyphenMan
Mar 31, 2010




Pillbug

Armond White is a troll. We knew this seven years ago when he bashed Toy Stroy 3 and praised Transformers 2.

Jmcrofts
Jan 7, 2008

just chillin' in the club

Lipstick Apathy

I thought this movie was incredible. I hope it doesn't get forgotten by next oscar season because I think it could honestly be a Best Picture contender.

I was just amazed by how deep the racial themes go: Obviously on the surface level the movie is dealing with the idea that it's uncomfortable to be a black man surrounded by well-meaning but ignorant white people, as well as how white people believe they are "post-racial" because they support Obama or have a black friend. But 2 other ideas really stood out to me:

-White people misguidedly think that they are being anti-racist or "a good ally" by putting black people on a pedestal. But in reality what they are doing is turning that person into an object, something to point at and go "wow look how great they are, and look how great I am for loving them!" And of course the villains in the movie are literally turning black people into objects.

-White people are able to appropriate blackness, putting on another race's cultural markers and wearing it like a mask they can take off at will. This is a privilege not shared by black people, who are unable to discard their blackness and are judged based on it every day. In the film, instead of getting dreadlocks or putting on a fake patois they go all the way by appropriating a black person's entire existence. The way Andre at the party says that his "black experience" has been great stood out to me, with the white person inside receiving the benefits of his newfound youth and virility without having to deal with most of the difficulties of being black in America.

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Maxwell Lord posted:

Yeah, so Armond White is a Respectability Politics, "Welfare state is slavery!" conservative, and THAT'S why he's writing for NR.

Good to know.

He's always come off as anti-respectability politics.

MisterBibs
Jul 17, 2010

dolla dolla
bill y'all


Fun Shoe

Got a free ticket to see the movie again today, and I wonder: were Grandma and Grandpa putting on domestic/groundskeeper acts for Chris, or did they agree to just be unpaid help for the family when they got put into new bodies?

I could imagine the grandma being okay with being the dutiful cook, 50s mentalities for women being what they were, but it seems like a proud man-of-the-house dude would have issues being given a new lease on life, only to be the lowly help.

Jmcrofts
Jan 7, 2008

just chillin' in the club

Lipstick Apathy

MisterBibs posted:

Got a free ticket to see the movie again today, and I wonder: were Grandma and Grandpa putting on domestic/groundskeeper acts for Chris, or did they agree to just be unpaid help for the family when they got put into new bodies?

I could imagine the grandma being okay with being the dutiful cook, 50s mentalities for women being what they were, but it seems like a proud man-of-the-house dude would have issues being given a new lease on life, only to be the lowly help.


I think he would probably be happy to be able to go do the yardwork again after years of being elderly. I know my dad loves mowing the lawn and chopping wood, old people are weird.

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Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


also he was probably putting on a bit of a show just until Chris got lobotomized

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