Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«77 »
  • Locked thread
Nroo
Dec 31, 2007



Davros1 posted:

I'm kind of shocked that they didn't film both halves of this new version at the same time, and are instead waiting.

That would add a lot more to the cost of what is probably an already sizable budget for an R rated horror movie. The overwhelming response to the trailer must've taken the studio by surprise.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007

Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.


ozza posted:

Here's an oral history of the miniseries that I found more interesting than the miniseries itself: https://www.yahoo.com/tv/back-to-de...-153351801.html

There's good stuff in there about how the spider ended up looking so horrid.

quote:

Originally published in 1986, It held the distinction of being Stephen Kings longest novel at the time, weighing in at 1,138 pages. (The unabridged version of The Stand later surpassed it by 14 pages. Under the Dome is a close third at a page count of 1,074.)

Jesus Christ, really? I read Under the Dome as an ebook so that length never registered with me. It's amazing how a book almost as long as the others could have so little stuff in it worth remembering. I'd have sworn it was only about 400 pages.

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!


Fun Shoe

I'm surprised there isn't a more concerted effort going on to do a full-on King Cinematic Universe with all of these vaguely connected stories. The structure is there, King has written 3 or 4 standalone books that all connect back to the Dark Tower, but I haven't heard any talk of them being made/remade. I'm thinking of Salem's Lot and Insomnia specifically but there are others like The Talisman.

Nroo
Dec 31, 2007



Basebf555 posted:

I'm surprised there isn't a more concerted effort going on to do a full-on King Cinematic Universe with all of these vaguely connected stories. The structure is there, King has written 3 or 4 standalone books that all connect back to the Dark Tower, but I haven't heard any talk of them being made/remade. I'm thinking of Salem's Lot and Insomnia specifically but there are others like The Talisman.

They are doing that Castle Rock tv show, which seems to be made with all that in mind. There's very little info about it right now, though.

Bruteman
Apr 15, 2003

Can I ask ya somethin', Padre? When I was kickin' your ass back there... you get a little wood?

ozza posted:

Here's an oral history of the miniseries that I found more interesting than the miniseries itself: https://www.yahoo.com/tv/back-to-de...-153351801.html

There's good stuff in there about how the spider ended up looking so horrid.

This is great, thanks.

Timeless Appeal
May 28, 2006


I wonder if they've discussed just casting Seth Green as adult Richie.

Acht
Aug 13, 2012

WORLD'S BEST
E-DAD


Nroo posted:

They are doing that Castle Rock tv show, which seems to be made with all that in mind. There's very little info about it right now, though.

This is the first time I hear this. Going to keep track a bit, thanks!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Rock_(TV_series)

Macdeo Lurjtux
Jul 5, 2011

BRRREADSTOOORRM!


Apparently people on Twitter are starting to twig on to the fact that this version of IT is coming out 27 years after the mini-series.

No. 1 Apartheid Fan
Aug 20, 2005



Ensign_Ricky posted:

Apparently one of those "creative differences" was his insistence on keeping...that scene.

You know.

That scene.

You really shouldn't joke about this, if this movie ends up sucking it'll probably be because a bunch of executives and test audiences led to King's weird, oversized, unpleasant book (prolly his best horror novel, as someone who isn't really a fan) becoming a Summer Chiller about a spooky clown.

The fear of "that scene" and Fukunaga's frustration with the studio wanting him to "write cliches" are absolutely part of the same problem. It's also a mistake to just hack the child and adult halves of the story into two discrete pieces with zero overlap and make them two consecutive films that tell a linear narrative.

Trailer looks good but I'm very worried about the writing.

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!


Fun Shoe

Even if the kids were going to be the main focus in the first film, it would have been a good idea to at least establish the adult versions and lay the foundations for that now. From what I've seen it sounds like the adults literally won't be appearing at all(or haven't even been cast yet?), which does seem like its doing a disservice to the King novel.

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!

Macdeo Lurjtux posted:

Apparently people on Twitter are starting to twig on to the fact that this version of IT is coming out 27 years after the mini-series.

Yeah it popped up in my Now feed yesterday with a clickbait article titled "The scariest thing about the new IT movie"

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For that you get the head...

the tail...

the whole damned thing.

I think it's a mistake to make "Kid IT" and "Grown Up IT' into two films but I could see it working. I keep thinking of how "Sleepers" handled it with long segments devoted to the present and the flashbacks.

Hodgepodge
Jan 29, 2006


SHUT THE FUCK UP ABOUT PEWDIEPIE

(This red text bought on behalf of the Save Lowtax From Crippling Medical Debt Fund.)



BiggerBoat posted:

Same. I honestly can't think of an ending that might be satisfying and not ridiculous and the ending of the book itself is already its weakest element. Gangbangs and space turtles aren't gonna work. I like the idea someone had in this thread where you wind up with some sort of clown spider and I can picture that - where Pennywise just keeps evolving into increasingly more monstrous forms culminating in this giant spider with a few weird, subtle clown elements.

Sounds like a Final Fantasy endboss.

Timeless Appeal
May 28, 2006


The pro move would have been to not film the sequel for another 27 years.

Should've hired Linklater.

Acht
Aug 13, 2012

WORLD'S BEST
E-DAD


wizard on a water slide posted:

Trailer looks good but I'm very worried about the writing.

Sharing the worries, but drat the trailer does look good eh?
The slides part and It running at the kid are giving me the chills.

davidspackage
May 16, 2007



Doctor Rope

Every time I see this thread I read the title as "We all float ITT".

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Not having read the book, can someone spell out concrete reasons why they don't want to see the kid/adult stories split into two movies? I'm a person who usually gets annoyed with framing devices in film because often they dampen the sense of immediate urgency.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



Personally I'm a big fan of the book and I think splitting it into those two distinct parts is the best way to do it. The parallel narratives work really well in the novel but on film I think it'd be pretty clunky and sap the momentum (see: the miniseries)

Timeless Appeal
May 28, 2006


Steve Yun posted:

Not having read the book, can someone spell out concrete reasons why they don't want to see the kid/adult stories split into two movies? I'm a person who usually gets annoyed with framing devices in film because often they dampen the sense of immediate urgency.
To be honest, there's just not a whole lot there. In the book the framing device works because there is this tension to it. The events of the summer have been forgotten by the kids. So you have this constant tension of them rediscovering what happened. The book begins with this cold-open of Georgie's death, a recent Pennywise related death, and then you get what is definitely well over a hundred pages of just the adults reacting to the phone call that It's back and they need to return to Derry. You get these people who are both successful and hosed up knowing they have to come back to fight this monster, but they don't really know what it is and you as the reader don't know what it is either. You get more and more of what happened in 58 as they get closer to Derry. But as it's been mentioned before, the finale just doesn't really hit. There's some interesting ideas and thematics but they never congeal properly.

The 1958 parts really heightens the 1984 parts, and you're essentially draining a lot of what makes the 84 section work in what is already the weaker half of the story. I think it could work as long as they preserve the themes but go there own way with it.

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!


Fun Shoe

Steve Yun posted:

Not having read the book, can someone spell out concrete reasons why they don't want to see the kid/adult stories split into two movies? I'm a person who usually gets annoyed with framing devices in film because often they dampen the sense of immediate urgency.

Its kinda hard to answer without spoilers, so read at your own risk, but King establishes right awaythat something horrible happened to these kids by showing that one of them chooses to commit suicide almost 30 years later just to avoid having to go back to Derry. So you don't have the same type of "who's going to die and who will survive" urgency that is more common in horror movies, but there's a drive to the story in that we're seeing how traumatized the adult characters are and learning more about how they got that way as it goes on.

Both sides of the story play off each other. So something that happens in the adult storyline will give you insight into something that happens when they were kids, and vice versa. For instance, Beverly and her abusive father/husband.

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!

I haven't read it but I am working through the audiobook and at almost 11 hours in the adults still haven't made it back to Derry in the and kids haven't even all gotten together as a group yet. It's definitely a slow burn

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Len posted:

I haven't read it but I am working through the audiobook and at almost 11 hours in the adults still haven't made it back to Derry in the and kids haven't even all gotten together as a group yet. It's definitely a slow burn

It's a big drat book.

Davros1
Jul 19, 2007

You've got to admit, you are kind of implausible

Len posted:

I haven't read it but I am working through the audiobook and at almost 11 hours in the adults still haven't made it back to Derry in the and kids haven't even all gotten together as a group yet. It's definitely a slow burn

Steven Weber is awesome though.

egon_beeblebrox
Feb 29, 2008

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.



Davros1 posted:

Steven Weber is awesome though.

Yeah, I really enjoyed his take on Pennywise.

Tenzarin
Jul 24, 2007
Probation
Can't post for 5 days!


Taco Defender


I love this music video, take on me.

SimonCat
Aug 12, 2016



Roger Ebert talks about clowns:

Ebert posted:

I don't like clowns, never have, never will. For that matter, I was terrified of Santa Claus when I was a kid and was taken to visit him in the department store at Christmastime. Like a lot of small children, I instinctively knew that clowns were not clowns, but adult males dressed up in a weird way for reasons I would rather not know anything about. They pretended they wanted to be my friends, and yet they hid themselves behind bizarre and frightening disguises. They didn't look like fun friends to me.

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

SimonCat posted:

Roger Ebert talks about clowns:

Yes. Exactly.

The worst was giant full costumed adults where you can't even see their faces. Chuck E Cheese was an absolute nightmare for me. It's a fun place for kids to play games, but don't let your mind wander off the monster lurking around any corner, looking for you. Only you.

Yeesh.

Guy Mann
Mar 28, 2016

by Lowtax


Coulrophobia is something limited entirely to America in the past 50 years, acting like being afraid of clowns is some ancient innate is silly.

Antifa Turkeesian
Aug 20, 2006



Broken Cake

Guy Mann posted:

Coulrophobia is something limited entirely to America in the past 50 years, acting like being afraid of clowns is some ancient innate is silly.

There's some deeper cultural poo poo there, like Pagliacci and Dr. Calgari. Also American clowns in the 20th century are unique from their European predecessors thanks to, like, mass media and postwar economics. Italians from 200 years ago didn't have surly neighborhood guys show up at their birthday parties or watch Bozo on tv. Clowns weren't set aside as for children and largely stayed inside theater and festivals for most of their existence. Young Ebert knew what was up with the 50s.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For that you get the head...

the tail...

the whole damned thing.

Bruteman posted:

This is great, thanks.

Seconding this. Finally got around to reading this article and it was very interesting, especially the the part where they talk about how Pennywise had to look like a regular clown to be scary, which seems to be a bone of contention because as much as people insist he always looked like Clarabelle or Bozo it's simply not the case. But the fact that Curry was so adamantly against prosthetics really drives this angle home of the character seeming harmless on the surface. He was so loving good selling the character and emoting behind the make up, using his voice, his facial expressions and his voice inflection to drive the fear element. The bloodshot eyes are a really subtle and very effective way to evoke the creepiness too.

I'm not sure how to follow up on it really but making Pennywise Bozo or Ronald McDonald again is probably an unwise approach since there's just no way to top it.

Maybe some cut aways could work. Like having Pennywise look like a standard bozo clown, cut to the kids face/reaction and then back to the clown only this time he has the silver eyes or his teeth are yellow and every time we cut back to Pennywise, his appearance shifts subtly. Based on what I've seen, I'm inclined to trust the film makers so far.

Davros1
Jul 19, 2007

You've got to admit, you are kind of implausible

For me, the most amazing thing about Tim Curry's performance, is I don't see Tim Curry. We've all seen performances of actors in make-up/prosthetics, and you can easily recognize the actor beneath it, whether is physical or vocally, but I can't see Curry.

Antifa Turkeesian
Aug 20, 2006



Broken Cake

I'm watching the 90s miniseries now and I'm surprised by all the Vancouver tv regulars who show up in what must be one of the first us tv productions to film there. So far Smoking Man and Mulder's sister from X-Files have shown up, both looking young as hell. Smoking Man has brown hair, still!

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Davros1 posted:

For me, the most amazing thing about Tim Curry's performance, is I don't see Tim Curry. We've all seen performances of actors in make-up/prosthetics, and you can easily recognize the actor beneath it, whether is physical or vocally, but I can't see Curry.

Same, and it's why I liked Heath Ledger's joker so much. I would have never ever guessed the actor behind he character. I guess that makes them good actors.

davidspackage
May 16, 2007



Doctor Rope

I just hope they don't pull any of that Canadian bullshit.

Timeless Appeal
May 28, 2006


BiggerBoat posted:

I'm not sure how to follow up on it really but making Pennywise Bozo or Ronald McDonald again is probably an unwise approach since there's just no way to top it.
I think the way Curry plays It was the sort of gruffer versions of Bozo like WGN's or Rusty Nails, the inspiration for Krusty the Clown. I think Curry plays him in a way there is a level of surliness and underlying danger even when he's trying to be pleasant. I think it would be interesting to play him more with the guidance counselor tone that Ronald McDonald has and--as mentioned--the audio book employs.

I think saying there's no way to top it isn't really right, you just can't do it the same way Curry did. I think the lesson is that you need a good performance that just gets across the disdain it has for this victims and the joy it takes in what it does.

FreudianSlippers
Apr 12, 2010

Shooting and Fucking
are the same thing!


I remember enjoying the first part of the TV film but thinking the second part with the adults was pretty dull.

Im now listening to the audio book and it's amazing how much better it works when the two stories are intertwined instead of being separate. Which is why I'm a bit worried the same will apply to this new film, that is to say that the first film will be very good while the adult part is alright at best.

SimonCat
Aug 12, 2016



Re-watching the TV movie. Forgot about the Irish cop in the movie. They're hanging out by the river and Paddy McStereotype stops by.

SimonCat fucked around with this message at Apr 18, 2017 around 03:08

Blade_of_tyshalle
Jul 12, 2009

If you think that, along the way, you're not going to fail... you're blind.

There's no one I've ever met, no matter how successful they are, who hasn't said they had their failures along the way.



Paddy O'stereotype, excuse me.

SimonCat
Aug 12, 2016



The TV movie is alright, but it really doesn't stick the ending. I know that Pennywise is only a representation of IT, but for the final boss to be a silly stop motion spider... sigh.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!

SimonCat posted:

Re-watching the TV movie. Forgot about the Irish cop in the movie. They're hanging out by the river and Paddy McStereotype stops by.

It's so random and out of nowhere I half expected it to be Pennywise.

The audiobook is really good since the guy is actually emoting during it. I've listened to some real poo poo audiobooks where the person just drones and I expected that from this one.

  • Locked thread
«77 »