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  • Locked thread
Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Lordshmee posted:

The Library Policeman was the most traumatizing thing I have EVER read. Four Past Midnight is probably the best collection of short stories King has ever written. I know this is CD, but if you haven't read this collection and you like King at all go get it.

I was working at an airport when I was younger. I became familiar with The Langoliers about a week before a freak every-ten-years statewide cicada orgy. Millions of cicadas within earshot at a time. It sounded exactly like the langoliers and was creepy as poo poo.

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BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For that you get the head...

the tail...

the whole damned thing.

Lordshmee posted:

The Library Policeman was the most traumatizing thing I have EVER read.

Did you read "A Very Dark Place"? Because Jesus Christ.

The Saddest Rhino
Apr 29, 2009

I could hear the roots of loneliness creeping through me when the world was hushed at four o'clock in the morning


BiggerBoat posted:

Did you read "A Very Dark Place"? Because Jesus Christ.

i can't find this, is it "A Very Tight Place"?

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For that you get the head...

the tail...

the whole damned thing.

The Saddest Rhino posted:

i can't find this, is it "A Very Tight Place"?

that one. my fault.

ImpAtom
May 24, 2007



I stand by my feeling that the scariest thing Stephen King has ever written was "The Jaunt."

Guy Mann
Mar 28, 2016

by Lowtax


Survivor Type rules, not only is it legitimately horrifying but it's the rare time in fiction where a story being presented as a series of journal entries makes sense and is used effectively.

deoju
Jul 11, 2004

All the pieces matter.


Nap Ghost

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=av0FGjXSOr4

Not much we didn't see in the first one. The dynamic among the kids ]seems good though. Also the echoing laugh in the tunnels is creepy.

Timeless Appeal
May 28, 2006


I like that their playing with the idea of the balloons defying physics.

ozza
Oct 23, 2008



I still think there's something about the Pennywise design that's trying too hard - but I'll reserve final judgement till the film's out, because everything else in these trailers looks good.

WattsvilleBlues
Jan 25, 2005

Every demon wants his pound of flesh

Timeless Appeal posted:

I like that their playing with the idea of the balloons defying physics.

Are they all moving as one in the trailer?

Nroo
Dec 31, 2007



WB seems to have wiped the trailer from youtube entirely but it's still here:

https://twitter.com/MTV/status/861391742381064192

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


I really dig that perfect triangle of balloons, that's super creepy.

davidspackage
May 16, 2007



Doctor Rope

Still looks promising. Isn't gray water the runoff of like washing machines and drains, but not piss & shitwater?

Having just finished reading the book again, I'm a little sad they're doing the same thing as the miniseries by splitting the plots; having the kids' and adults' stories converge at the conclusion is so amazingly tense.

Also holy poo poo is the part where they start forgetting each other again sad

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

davidspackage posted:

Still looks promising. Isn't gray water the runoff of like washing machines and drains, but not piss & shitwater?

Yeah, it's water excluding sewage, but they're kids, so they are pretty unreliable narrators when it comes to urban facts.

davidspackage
May 16, 2007



Doctor Rope

Drifter posted:

Yeah, it's water excluding sewage, but they're kids, so they are pretty unreliable narrators when it comes to urban facts.

That's true. I just remembered that in the book, officer Nell explains it to them specifically.

WattsvilleBlues
Jan 25, 2005

Every demon wants his pound of flesh

davidspackage posted:

having the kids' and adults' stories converge at the conclusion is so amazingly tense.

Also holy poo poo is the part where they start forgetting each other again sad

Agreed on both parts. Mike's last journal entry was heartbreaking.

ProperCoochie
Oct 11, 2004

In Sicily, carbombs are more dangerous than women.

I love the novel. The horror, the lore and history, the kids, the adults reconciling rough childhoods with adulthood, the adults moving on after the horror. It works on so many levels for me. I first read it at 16, and I had certain expectations from the miniseries. I loved the format, especially that the '58 and '85 climaxes are revealed in tandem.


The thread talked about IT and its influence over Derry, but didn't discuss just how drastic it was. During the final confrontation, the damage done to IT effects Derry and its people. A huge storm rolls in and it wreaks havoc on important locations from the novel. There's a footbridge that explodes, the Standpipe collapses, streets cave in. Even that Irish caricature cop, there's a moment when Richie has to convince himself and IT that he isn't afraid, so he speaks in the cop's silly voice. IIRC, elsewhere at the same moment, the cop stands up and says the line too and drops dead. Also, I have to commend the few previous posts mentioning how sad it is when the adults start forgetting everything that they shared together. That stuff really pulled me when I first read it, and still does when I think about it. It's pure melancholy saved only by the reader's understanding that they have truly defeated IT for good. With that, I adore the final chapter, when Bill triumphs over the final lingering threads of IT's terror and "beats the devil" and saves his catatonic wife.

I like the TV miniseries for what it is. I agree with the consensus that the first half is far superior. The DVD has a commentary track and it's a worthwhile experience, it certainly enhanced my appreciation for the film. The director seemed most pleased with the introduction and set up of seven main characters (twice--as children and adults) within 90 minutes. I have to agree with him--that's no easy feat, and such a tall order is very uncommon. He and the actors discuss some of the shortcomings and they reminisce and laugh about the good times during filming. You can sense John Ritter enjoyed the people around him and that they enjoyed having him around. It's sad when he muses on them reuniting 27 years down the road...

I'll watch the new film with an open mind and a big smile. It can't be like the 1000+ page book and that's okay. The realities of the film industry cannot bear what it would take to make a book-accurate IT adaption. (And I'm not sure I'd even want one. One reason why Stephen King films always seem crummy is because King spends so much time in character's heads.)


Here's a treat for the thread. I noticed this on my own, but I'm really surprised it hasn't popped up in more places:

Timeless Appeal posted:

I'm making my way through the book, and I simultaneously hope that the Turtle is left out of the film like it was in the miniseries, but also hope there is constant subtle turtle imagery all over the movie.

In the first trailer, there is definitely turtle imagery. Part of the construction site is a tarp covering a dirt mound with weights on the edges. A common thing for a construction site during a storm, and it works perfectly here. At :20 and :26 it looks like a turtle shell, and :27 when Georgie rises and passes the road block it absolutely looks like a turtle shell.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnCdOQsX5kc

I can recall one turtle reference around this scene in the novel. When Georgie goes to the basement to get the wax for the paper boat, the jar is labelled something like Turtle Brand Wax.

Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007

Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.


ProperCoochie posted:



I can recall one turtle reference around this scene in the novel. When Georgie goes to the basement to get the wax for the paper boat, the jar is labelled something like Turtle Brand Wax.

That's an actual product, and would have been back then, too:

https://www.turtlewax.com/

Davros1
Jul 19, 2007

You've got to admit, you are kind of implausible

davidspackage posted:

Still looks promising. Isn't gray water the runoff of like washing machines and drains, but not piss & shitwater?

Having just finished reading the book again, I'm a little sad they're doing the same thing as the miniseries by splitting the plots; having the kids' and adults' stories converge at the conclusion is so amazingly tense.

Also holy poo poo is the part where they start forgetting each other again sad

The only problem I can see with doing like the book is where would they end the first film?

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!


Fun Shoe

Davros1 posted:

The only problem I can see with doing like the book is where would they end the first film?

I think the best place to end the first film would be when the Losers face It inside the house on Nebolt Street and shoot it with the silver slugs, and for the 80's storyline when It puts Bill's wife in a coma and kills Bev's husband.

Both would end on a major confrontation with It, while also setting up the real showdown in both storylines for the second film.

Violator
May 15, 2003



It's been over a decade since I read it, but how does the book handle the stories going on at the same time? For example, wouldn't the adults being alive kinda spoil which kids survive their part of the story? Would that lesson the dramatic effect in the movie since you can't spend hundreds of pages working around that issue? The dude killing himself in the tub in part 2 of the mini series is super strong way of beginning. I can't remember how the book handled it.

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!


Fun Shoe

Violator posted:

It's been over a decade since I read it, but how does the book handle the stories going on at the same time? For example, wouldn't the adults being alive kinda spoil which kids survive their part of the story? Would that lesson the dramatic effect in the movie since you can't spend hundreds of pages working around that issue? The dude killing himself in the tub in part 2 of the mini series is super strong way of beginning. I can't remember how the book handled it.

What you're not taking into account is the fact that as adults, they can't remember what happened or how to defeat It. They have to come together again and remember everything first, so you synch up the scenes that happen in the past with the ones that are the most relevant in the present. They are "learning" new information right along with the reader/audience. It's just a different way of structuring a story, a similar more recent example is True Detective. You have a point about the length though, no way it can be done in 2 hours, it'd have to be two movies. Which it is, so I don't see the problem.

Origami Dali
Jan 7, 2005

Get ready to fuck!
You fucker's fucker!
You fucker!


The problem is that we already know everything that happens when they were kids if the first movie is going to be solely about that. If all the drama when they're adults is supposed to be from remembering what happens when they were kids, what IT was and what they did, then the second film will have to be restructured to focus on something else because we'll already know that stuff. The miniseries at least got that right in the first half, intertwining the two timelines.

Granted, I don't think IT the novel can really be made into a totally book-loyal movie anyway. There's too many things in there, especially when it comes to character behavior and scares that will be either odd or not scary to an adult movie audience. This is another thing I think the miniseries did well, keeping a lot of the vital stuff that would work for a movie and excised a lot of the stuff that wouldn't. It really could have benefited from another hour, though.

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Nroo posted:

WB seems to have wiped the trailer from youtube entirely but it's still here:

https://twitter.com/MTV/status/861391742381064192

God drat that looks good.

ozza
Oct 23, 2008



ProperCoochie posted:

The thread talked about IT and its influence over Derry, but didn't discuss just how drastic it was. During the final confrontation, the damage done to IT effects Derry and its people. A huge storm rolls in and it wreaks havoc on important locations from the novel. There's a footbridge that explodes, the Standpipe collapses, streets cave in. Even that Irish caricature cop, there's a moment when Richie has to convince himself and IT that he isn't afraid, so he speaks in the cop's silly voice. IIRC, elsewhere at the same moment, the cop stands up and says the line too and drops dead. Also, I have to commend the few previous posts mentioning how sad it is when the adults start forgetting everything that they shared together. That stuff really pulled me when I first read it, and still does when I think about it. It's pure melancholy saved only by the reader's understanding that they have truly defeated IT for good. With that, I adore the final chapter, when Bill triumphs over the final lingering threads of IT's terror and "beats the devil" and saves his catatonic wife.


I really enjoyed the climax of the book too. Before reading I'd heard that it was underwhelming, but I thought that the rolling destruction of the town combined with the cosmic weirdness of the Losers' confrontation(s) with It was an excellent way to finish the story. Another part I enjoyed that I haven't seen mentioned in this thread is the time travelling vision of It's arrival on Earth, millions of years ago. It was just the right amount of origin story - a lesser story would have had something vaguer or more specific, but I think King pitched it just right.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For that you get the head...

the tail...

the whole damned thing.

ProperCoochie posted:

One reason why Stephen King films always seem crummy is because King spends so much time in character's heads.)

Great point in a really good post.

CDHiggs
Dec 16, 2016

That night in Point Pleasant. Those red eyes Richard Gere would never forget.

As a 15-year old, this book captured my imagination; as a 37-year old, I can't even make it past 300 pages. Yes, I probably got old and dead inside, but the cringy kid dialogue, junkyard jerk-off sequence, pre-fight sexual healing scene, and Richie's black slave impressions are enough for me to leave this one on the shelf.

The movie does look much better than the miniseries, however. That much is clear.

Bruteman
Apr 15, 2003

Can I ask ya somethin', Padre? When I was kickin' your ass back there... you get a little wood?

ozza posted:

I really enjoyed the climax of the book too. Before reading I'd heard that it was underwhelming, but I thought that the rolling destruction of the town combined with the cosmic weirdness of the Losers' confrontation(s) with It was an excellent way to finish the story. Another part I enjoyed that I haven't seen mentioned in this thread is the time travelling vision of It's arrival on Earth, millions of years ago. It was just the right amount of origin story - a lesser story would have had something vaguer or more specific, but I think King pitched it just right.

Agreed on the smoke hole scene - it's been over a decade since I read the book but that part still sticks with me, as brief as it is. It's a great "oh poo poo" moment when they realize just how ancient and inimical It is to everything on earth, and King sells the panic in the description of the scene perfectly.

ProperCoochie posted:

One reason why Stephen King films always seem crummy is because King spends so much time in character's heads.

Too bad when they finally got around to literally doing that (Jonesy and Mr. Grey in Dreamcatcher), it was still a crummy film.

CDHiggs
Dec 16, 2016

That night in Point Pleasant. Those red eyes Richard Gere would never forget.

Bruteman posted:

Too bad when they finally got around to literally doing that (Jonesy and Mr. Grey in Dreamcatcher), it was still a crummy film.

I don't think I've ever laughed harder than I did at Dreamcatcher. So much top notch talent (Lawrence Kasdan!) behind such an indefensible turd. And the Jonesy/Mr Grey poo poo was incredible. Whenever Mr Grey took over Jonesy, out came the evil British accent, and I could not stop laughing. To be fair, the book is also a complete mess. Can't really hold it against King, though: it was his first one after the car accident.

Darko
Dec 23, 2004



ImpAtom posted:

I stand by my feeling that the scariest thing Stephen King has ever written was "The Jaunt."

The Jaunt was completely frightening in its implications of what happened to those characters.

But the ending of Revival has much worse implications than that, and would be truly frightening (I've read that some people don't understand what's going on there due to the descriptors).

Acht
Aug 13, 2012

WORLD'S BEST
E-DAD


HUNDU THE BEAST GOD posted:

God drat that looks good.

Agreed. It's getting to me too, even.
The music especially.

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Maybe I'm just biased in Muschetti's favor because it obviously looks great. But even the tenor and rythym of the dialogue sounds like reading King. As someone who isn't even the biggest fan of the book, I'm surprised how taken I am by it, especially contrasted with The Dark Tower.

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD fucked around with this message at May 9, 2017 around 22:17

WattsvilleBlues
Jan 25, 2005

Every demon wants his pound of flesh

Acht posted:

Agreed. It's getting to me too, even.
The music especially.

Yeah I hope that trailer music makes it into the movie. There's something beautifully stark about it that makes it perfect for the barrens and Derry, the wrongness of the entire world there.

Nroo
Dec 31, 2007



So is Mama any good? I'd never heard of Muschietti before this but everything in these trailers has looked very promising. Though I'm sure Chung Chung-hoon's cinematography helped a lot..

HUNDU THE BEAST GOD
Sep 14, 2007

everything is yours


Nroo posted:

So is Mama any good? I'd never heard of Muschietti before this but everything in these trailers has looked very promising. Though I'm sure Chung Chung-hoon's cinematography helped a lot..

I don't care if I'm alone in this but Mama is one of my favorite horror movies from the last decade.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



Nroo posted:

So is Mama any good? I'd never heard of Muschietti before this but everything in these trailers has looked very promising. Though I'm sure Chung Chung-hoon's cinematography helped a lot..

I didn't love it, but it was decent. Muschietti can definitely set up and execute a good scare scene.

WattsvilleBlues
Jan 25, 2005

Every demon wants his pound of flesh

Nroo posted:

So is Mama any good? I'd never heard of Muschietti before this but everything in these trailers has looked very promising. Though I'm sure Chung Chung-hoon's cinematography helped a lot..

It's great until the last 20 minutes, but up to then it's really solid and unsettling.

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!

I finally hit that spot towards the end. Having a guy read me a scene about a preteen orgy is even more awkward than I expected it to be

Tart Kitty
Dec 17, 2016

Oh, well, that's all water under the bridge, as I always say. Water under the bridge!



Re: creepy King chat above, I found N. to be very unnerving. It's basically King straight up writing a Lovecraft story, but he is very good at it.

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Nroo
Dec 31, 2007



HUNDU THE BEAST GOD posted:

I don't care if I'm alone in this but Mama is one of my favorite horror movies from the last decade.

Would you mind selling me on it? I've been only getting mixed reactions otherwise.

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