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bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Escape Addict posted:

the exofficio boxer brief

They are amazing and last forever. I have had like 8-9 pairs in rotation for like 4-5 years now with no real wear or loosening.

Also I maintain that Gold Bond is better then body glide.

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Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Epitope posted:

Barefoot, the true way of the hiking master. How many grams are we wasting on boots and socks? Shameful

Lest you think I be joking https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cody_Lundin

camp shoes aren't hiking shoes

I use trail runners for backpacking so generally they're also still pretty comfy to wear around camp but I'll dance around in bare feet going "ow ow mother fucker" as well when trying to walk around camp

I'm kind of "meh" on the exofficio boxer briefs. They work alright. I have some merino boxer briefs with a bit longer leg that seemed to fit better and feel better. Might be different if I was always backpacking in humid areas.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

The inside of my pants is always a humid area friend.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


As I understand it that's why you're looking for booty shorts

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

Levitate posted:

As I understand it that's why you're looking for booty shorts

Easier to twerk.

I like gold bond as well, but never felt it worked as a good enough barrier for friction. Also, reminds me of the loving leather pants issue from that one episode of Friends.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




I like to bring good sandals when I backpack to hang out at camp or to use if I encounter a flooded trail and I don't want to get my boots wet. Barefoot is good too, but there tends to be so many sappy needles and twigs everywhere I go because the forests here are almost entirely conifer, and I prefer to not get that crap on my feet.

I go barefoot while car camping though, it owns.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Escape Addict posted:

Thank you for the advice, ASSTASTIC.

What kind of underwear do you guys recommend? Is the exofficio boxer brief the best? Smart wool? What works well for you?

What underwear?

an ounce off the crotch is a pound off the mind

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Escape Addict posted:

What kind of underwear do you guys recommend? Is the exofficio boxer brief the best? Smart wool? What works well for you?

I purchased my first exofficio boxer brief a couple of months ago, and I fell in love. Now I am trying to buy at least one pair a month until I replace all my underwear.

ROFLburger
Jan 12, 2006


I'm going backpacking tomorrow for a few days and I'm wondering if it's uncommon to just not bring a stove? This'll be my first trip where I'll need hot water for food and my plan is to just use a campfire with a pot or whatever. I have trouble budgeting weight/space as it is, I don't want to try to accommodate a stove. I see stoves are always recommended but it just seems unnecessary to me? I've only gone backpacking a few times, though

Chard
Aug 24, 2010






ROFLburger posted:

I'm going backpacking tomorrow for a few days and I'm wondering if it's uncommon to just not bring a stove? This'll be my first trip where I'll need hot water for food and my plan is to just use a campfire with a pot or whatever. I have trouble budgeting weight/space as it is, I don't want to try to accommodate a stove. I see stoves are always recommended but it just seems unnecessary to me? I've only gone backpacking a few times, though

Where are you camping? In nearly every place I've been ground fires are either not allowed, or wood gathering is prohibited. If you're okay on those fronts then yeah a campfire and pot for water will do you fine.

Bogan King
Jan 21, 2013

I'm not racist, I'm mates with Bangladesh, the guy who sells me kebabs. No, I don't know his real name.

I don't take a stove with my a large chunk of the times I head out. But if there is a fire ban or the area is sensitive (even if fires are allowed) I'll take one. If you're going to be having a campfire anyway then taking a stove isn't needed at all.

Chard
Aug 24, 2010






Sometimes I forget that a lot of folks don't live in a state is perpetually on fire/almost on fire.

Bogan King
Jan 21, 2013

I'm not racist, I'm mates with Bangladesh, the guy who sells me kebabs. No, I don't know his real name.

Chard posted:

Sometimes I forget that a lot of folks don't live in a state is perpetually on fire/almost on fire.

Ahahaha,

We just realise that fire is going to happen and don't be dumb when the weather is stupid fire weather.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Where I live, fires aren't usually banned because of fire hazard, but because our forests are so slow-growing and the biodiversity is so sparse that if people regularly burned deadfall the forest floor would be cleared of any detritus within a week and that would leave absolutely nothing to contribute to the natural decay process.

Chard
Aug 24, 2010






Bogan King posted:

Ahahaha,

We just realise that fire is going to happen and don't be dumb when the weather is stupid fire weather.

I was gonna make some stupid joke about how your fire safety laws are all made by drop bears but then I remembered The Recent Situation here, and well, I just can't.

Anyway, I'd bet anyone reading this thread is perfectly capable of making a safe campfire. Woodgathering is still probably not good, because the ecosystem needs that decay, so stoves are nice if you want hot.

Morbus
May 18, 2004



ROFLburger posted:

I'm going backpacking tomorrow for a few days and I'm wondering if it's uncommon to just not bring a stove? This'll be my first trip where I'll need hot water for food and my plan is to just use a campfire with a pot or whatever. I have trouble budgeting weight/space as it is, I don't want to try to accommodate a stove. I see stoves are always recommended but it just seems unnecessary to me? I've only gone backpacking a few times, though

If you're only backpacking for a few days, the weight from a stove+fuel is pretty small, especially if you are carrying a pot anyway (as opposed to just forgoing cooking entirely). It's also a hell of a lot faster. So if you've been hiking for 15 hours and just want to eat your dinner and sleep, it's nice to have a stove.

But if you have experience building campfires in the general kind of terrain you'll be backpacking in, know that there will be suitable firewood that isn't all frozen, and there aren't regulatory/fire safety issues, go for it. Especially if you are planning on making a campfire anyway just for fun.

Morbus
May 18, 2004



CopperHound posted:

I always scoffed at alcohol stoves, but today I had some denatured alcohol, aluminum cans, and time:




I still need to try it out in breezy or rainy conditions, but I think I'm a convert.

You can just make a foil or w/e windscreen that weighs nothing, blocks the wind, and improves the efficiency of the stove to boot. There is also some company called Caldera Cone or something that will sell you this for $800,000. If you make one yourself, just be sure to have some ventilation holes at the bottom; there are plenty of good internet guides.

I used to use canister stoves but converted pretty quick to alcohol stoves once I tried them. They make for a noticeably lighter cook system, you can get fuel anywhere, and you don't end up with a zillion maybe half full leftover canisters lying around.

They are somewhat slower to boil than the best canister stoves, but there isn't really a qualitative difference. Some people who don't know what the gently caress they are talking about will tell you that they don't work in the cold, but I have used mine down to -30C without any issues. If you need to set yourself and everyone around you on fire melt a fuckton of snow, then a white gas or petrol stove is always going to be better just for the better fuel energy density, but for shorter winter trips alcohol works fine (and in any case are never worse than a gas canister stove).

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I need to start drinking soda or pbr to try a few more designs. After I glued that stove closed with rtv the alcohol was boiling off too fast. I got big orange flames and alcohol condensing on the bottom of pot. I'll try a making it a little taller next time.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

The best stove-cans I found were those aluminum bottles that Bud Light comes in sometimes. It's harder to cut but very easy to work with otherwise as it is nice and stiff. The big tallboy cans of coconut water they sell at hispanic grocery stores work well too.

The idea of there being places where it is possible to even make a dent in the available deadfall is crazy to me. I guess most of the mid Atlantic has not been allowed to burn for decades and decades now, but most older wooded spots are like an obstacle course of downed trees and branches.

Morbus
May 18, 2004



bongwizzard posted:

The best stove-cans I found were those aluminum bottles that Bud Light comes in sometimes. It's harder to cut but very easy to work with otherwise as it is nice and stiff. The big tallboy cans of coconut water they sell at hispanic grocery stores work well too.

The idea of there being places where it is possible to even make a dent in the available deadfall is crazy to me. I guess most of the mid Atlantic has not been allowed to burn for decades and decades now, but most older wooded spots are like an obstacle course of downed trees and branches.

Even in California, when there are not fire restrictions (lol), there is no issue making campfires in wooded areas. Most of the non-fire related restrictions are for areas near or above the treeline, in alpine meadows, etc.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



best dog pack? basset hound

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Submarine Sandpaper posted:

best dog pack? basset hound

Haha, no way. Like, I wanna see it, but the idea of taking a basset on a hike is so silly and cute I just don't know what to think.

Also, come on, the little guys have all that extra skin to lug around, carry the water for them you monster.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



bongwizzard posted:

Haha, no way. Like, I wanna see it, but the idea of taking a basset on a hike is so silly and cute I just don't know what to think.

Also, come on, the little guys have all that extra skin to lug around, carry the water for them you monster.

Check the best thread in PI, the hound thread, to see that he's a lean mean chaos engine. I'm hoping having 6-8 lbs on him, preferably in the shoulders, will get him to stop pulling for half the day.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Submarine Sandpaper posted:

Check the best thread in PI, the hound thread, to see that he's a lean mean chaos engine. I'm hoping having 6-8 lbs on him, preferably in the shoulders, will get him to stop pulling for half the day.

There is a hound thread?

We are on our third bloodhound, it's amazing to me anyone else can stand these awful animals.

Just takin a bath, getting creeped on by a hound.

Waroduce
Aug 5, 2008


So I'm going backpacking through Europe for 10 days and I hike ocasionally in Pennsylvabia. I need a bag, and was going to go with the redwing 50l for 100$ off amazon, but my gf is bitching at me for spending that much.


There are similar looking backpacks w internal frames and waist support for 30-50$on amazon. Is the quality of the redwing so superior to Warrent the extra cost?

The 30-50$ brands are g4free and outdoor master

meselfs
Sep 26, 2015

The body may die, but the soul is always rotten

seems like a good opportunity to bring up http://www.geartrade.com/

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

meselfs posted:

seems like a good opportunity to bring up http://www.geartrade.com/

This is awesome, it's going in the OP!


Waroduce posted:

So I'm going backpacking through Europe for 10 days and I hike ocasionally in Pennsylvabia. I need a bag, and was going to go with the redwing 50l for 100$ off amazon, but my gf is bitching at me for spending that much.


There are similar looking backpacks w internal frames and waist support for 30-50$on amazon. Is the quality of the redwing so superior to Warrent the extra cost?

The 30-50$ brands are g4free and outdoor master

Ripstop nylon is ripstop nylon, might be thinner and more susceptible to tearage, or aluminum frame more susceptible to breakage b/c quality control or gauge of the metal. Since you're in Europe and not in the wilderness where you life literally depends on the integrity of your pack, you're probably fine with a chineesium pack. You might also look at old Coleman or jansport packs on fleabay, those brands are pretty skookum for durability on a dime. Kelty might be in your budget as well.

Osprey, Gregory, Kelty, Z packs are some of the best ones I see most often. What else do you guys use?

ROFLburger posted:

I'm going backpacking tomorrow for a few days and I'm wondering if it's uncommon to just not bring a stove?

Tons of people don't bring a stove! Just pick food you don't need to heat up. A lot of dehydrated meals will re-hydrate just fine cold, or pack granola bars, jerky, trail mix, peanut butter, tortillas, etc. Heating water over the fire is a tremendous pain in the rear end and I guarantee will not turn out well. One, building a fire takes a lot of time and energy. Two, a cooking fire needs to be hot coals, which takes hours to build up to. Orange flames make for a terrible cooking fire, it's not very hot at all. Lastly, how are you going to suspend your pot over the flames to boil the water? And now your pot is going to get blackened and nasty from the fire.

You can try it, but plan for failure. I guarantee that you'll never try it again.

Esbit tablets and stoves make a great cheap lightweight alternative fyi

OSU_Matthew fucked around with this message at 11:35 on May 8, 2017

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

I'm one of those retards who buys tons of gear but never uses it because I never do anything. Like, ever. I always want to go backpacking but I missed some opportunities when I lived by Seattle (just did day hikes) and now I'm back in Wisconsin which I'm not so happy about. In fact, I've never been backpacking despite have a pack that is used to put on my back. I've always just done car camping. None of my friends here have time to go on a trip, nor are they active enough to want to or anything, and I'm determined to get out this year so I guess I'm going to have to go solo.

I think today I'm going to lay out all of my gear on my living room floor and put together a pack that I could potentially take with me for a standard hike/camp. Does anyone know of any places in SE or central Wisconsin that you can actually backpack? Everything I see is just camp sites that you walk a few hundred yards too (if that). I'd like to actually hike a trail where I can set up shop wherever I want. I'm not having much luck.

Please let me into your world.

Pennywise the Frown fucked around with this message at 17:12 on May 8, 2017

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


http://www.backpacker.com/stories/best-backpacking-in-wisconsin

I mean I dunno anything about Wisconsin but there's a few things that seem like they could be a starting point

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Pennywise the Frown posted:

I'm one of those retards who buys tons of gear but never uses it because I never do anything. Like, ever. I always want to go backpacking but I missed some opportunities when I lived by Seattle (just did day hikes) and now I'm back in Wisconsin which I'm not so happy about. In fact, I've never been backpacking despite have a pack that is used to put on my back. I've always just done car camping. None of my friends here have time to go on a trip, nor are they active enough to want to or anything, and I'm determined to get out this year so I guess I'm going to have to go solo.

I think today I'm going to lay out all of my gear on my living room floor and put together a pack that I could potentially take with me for a standard hike/camp. Does anyone know of any places in SE or central Wisconsin that you can actually backpack? Everything I see is just camp sites that you walk a few hundred yards too (if that). I'd like to actually hike a trail where I can set up shop wherever I want. I'm not having much luck.

Please let me into your world.

I think there's a really great backpacking trail around lake superior, you might want to Google around and see about that. Sleeping bear dunes in Michigan's UP and Grand Island are both places I would love to visit that might be relatively near your area.

Check out meetup.com for any hiking and backpacking groups near you, there are several near me here in Columbus with some pretty great people on there. Also check out regional meetups on the hammock forums to see if there's stuff near you. I've had mixed success convincing friends and co-workers to come out, and even people I used to go with regularly are just flaky, either because they're in a new relationship or for whatever reason... It's tough to convince people that it actually is fun to get outside and experience the world in a whole new way. I swear there's gotta be more people interested in doing this kind of thing since nine out of ten people on social media always list hiking as their favorite activity ever.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

I find places to hike by slowly panning around Google maps looking for parkland.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Ok I have one lead and one lead only. Apparently you can camp along the Ice Age trail as long as you camp withing 200 feet from water and the trail. The trail was carved out from glaciers and is over 1,000 miles that winds all around Wisconsin. There are only a few select parts you can set up shop and I think it's only in the Northern areas but that's excellent because North of Milwaukee is when the terrain starts getting really cool. I live in SE Wisconsin and everything is pretty flat besides some rolling hills. And ticks. Lots and lots of ticks. I'll have to do a lot more research and probably make some phone calls but I think I finally found what I'm looking for.

Sorry this isn't gear related but it will probably become so since I've never backpacked before.

Thanks for the help guys.

edit: The deer ticks here are loving horrible. Notice how the New England is filled with them............... and then just Wisconsin. Oh and this isn't tick reports, it LYME DISEASE reports.

Pennywise the Frown fucked around with this message at 19:20 on May 10, 2017

Chard
Aug 24, 2010






Pennywise the Frown posted:

edit: The deer ticks here are loving horrible. Notice how the New England is filled with them............... and then just Wisconsin. Oh and this isn't tick reports, it LYME DISEASE reports.



From how much I was always warned about it, I figured the West Coast had it bad when it comes to Lyme Disease, but that's horrifying.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Ok, here's a gear question. I have a really thin Columbia rain jacket that's kind of torn up and not breathable and basically it just feels like a poncho. Way too thin. So I am in the market for a new one. I'd like it to be not quite all weather, but spring, summer, fallish. Mostly for somewhat cooler temperatures because I'm one of those people who are always cold. I wear jeans all year round even when it's 90F. So I'm looking for something that is somewhat light but breathable which is what I suppose I'm most concerned about. I'm quite frugal so I'd prefer not spending $300 on one. The only outdoors store I have around here is Gander Mountain and Dick's. I doubt they'll have exactly what I'm looking for.

Do you guys ever buy clothing online? I always like to try something on before I buy it. I got up to 218 at my heaviest a few years ago and that jacket is a medium. Now I'm at about 189 and it fits but is a bit snug. I'm guessing I'll be quite safe ordering a large.

Anyway, do any of you guys have any suggestions?

Pennywise the Frown fucked around with this message at 21:14 on May 10, 2017

Leper Residue
Sep 28, 2003

To where no dog has gone before.


Try looking at stuff construction and like roadworkers wear. I got a caterpillar winter coat that's waterproof and windproof that I love and wear when doing winter day hikes. Caterpillar and Carhartt are good brands.

Like roadworkers have to stand outside in the cold rain all day they know what is up.

Morbus
May 18, 2004



Pennywise the Frown posted:

Ok I have one lead and one lead only. Apparently you can camp along the Ice Age trail as long as you camp withing 200 feet from water and the trail. The trail was carved out from glaciers and is over 1,000 miles that winds all around Wisconsin. There are only a few select parts you can set up shop and I think it's only in the Northern areas but that's excellent because North of Milwaukee is when the terrain starts getting really cool. I live in SE Wisconsin and everything is pretty flat besides some rolling hills. And ticks. Lots and lots of ticks. I'll have to do a lot more research and probably make some phone calls but I think I finally found what I'm looking for.

Sorry this isn't gear related but it will probably become so since I've never backpacked before.

Thanks for the help guys.

edit: The deer ticks here are loving horrible. Notice how the New England is filled with them............... and then just Wisconsin. Oh and this isn't tick reports, it LYME DISEASE reports.



You probably already know this but permethrin treating your clothes/gear/tent owns the gently caress out of ticks.

Morbus
May 18, 2004



Pennywise the Frown posted:

Ok, here's a gear question. I have a really thin Columbia rain jacket that's kind of torn up and not breathable and basically it just feels like a poncho. Way too thin. So I am in the market for a new one. I'd like it to be not quite all weather, but spring, summer, fallish. Mostly for somewhat cooler temperatures because I'm one of those people who are always cold. I wear jeans all year round even when it's 90F. So I'm looking for something that is somewhat light but breathable which is what I suppose I'm most concerned about. I'm quite frugal so I'd prefer not spending $300 on one. The only outdoors store I have around here is Gander Mountain and Dick's. I doubt they'll have exactly what I'm looking for.

Do you guys ever buy clothing online? I always like to try something on before I buy it. I got up to 218 at my heaviest a few years ago and that jacket is a medium. Now I'm at about 189 and it fits but is a bit snug. I'm guessing I'll be quite safe ordering a large.

Anyway, do any of you guys have any suggestions?

What is it for? If you just want to keep warm/dry in mild weather, a really waterproof rainjacket using a WP/B membrane like Goretex may not be the best option, especially if you plan to wear it while active and are concerned about breathability.

For milder precip a simple fleece jacket/sweater + reasonably high denier nylon windbreaker treated with DWR is a cheap and better option. You can get this for like <30 bucks but if you want to buy "real" gear something like a patagonia houdini windshirt (~$50-100) plus fleece or other light breathable insulating layer is what I usually use if it's cold and windy/raining/snowing but not pouring.

You could also get a stretch woven softshell but imo those are too expensive, less versatile, and weigh more than a simple fleece + windshirt combo without really adding any functionality.

If its really pouring you probably want something made with a really waterproof material, but unless you routinely spend lots of time hiking in super poo poo weather the jacket you wear for these occasions can be just be an "oh poo poo" thing and not something you wear whenever it rains. A Frogg toggs jacket is super cheap and light and uses a good WP/B material, but they are kind of fragile so best used as emergency raingear. The marmot precip jacket can be found online for ~$50 and is an OK general purpose WP/B rain jacket.

Whatever you do don't go buy a $300 3-layer eVent hardshell.

For outdoor gear online backcountry.com is decent and has a good return policy. So does moosejaw. REI garage has OK deals sometimes. EBay and geartrade are usually your best bet for good bargains.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

The patagonia houdini and the marmot precip look kind of nice. That's pretty much what I'm looking for. A lightweight but breathable jacket. I do actually have a Frogg Toggs jacket/pants for emergencies. I guess I'm looking for something for when it's just drizzling on mild days. This is a good start.

Leper Residue posted:

Try looking at stuff construction and like roadworkers wear. I got a caterpillar winter coat that's waterproof and windproof that I love and wear when doing winter day hikes. Caterpillar and Carhartt are good brands.

Like roadworkers have to stand outside in the cold rain all day they know what is up.

I actually have a cat jacket that's really good in inclement weather. It's a bit beat up since I wear it regularly but it's a little heavy so I doubt I'll use it on the trail.

Morbus posted:

You probably already know this but permethrin treating your clothes/gear/tent owns the gently caress out of ticks.

I have a bottle of that and I'm going to spray the poo poo out of everything before I go camping.

Thanks guys.

Pennywise the Frown fucked around with this message at 04:58 on May 11, 2017

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Leper Residue posted:

Try looking at stuff construction and like roadworkers wear. I got a caterpillar winter coat that's waterproof and windproof that I love and wear when doing winter day hikes. Caterpillar and Carhartt are good brands.

Like roadworkers have to stand outside in the cold rain all day they know what is up.

Raingear design for fisherman is also generally on the warm side of things, again due to being outside in the rain all day. I bought this amazing looking pair of rain bibs that I guess must be great if you're standing on top of the bass boat getting rained on for 10 hours, but have so far proven to be too hot for any remotely active pursuit.

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Sierra Nevadan
Nov 1, 2010



Don't use Permethrin around cats.

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