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Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Bought a lightweight 3 person backpacking tent that was on sale for some family camping this year. Gonna be interesting to test it out hopefully later this month

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bringer
Oct 16, 2005

I'm out there Jerry and I'm LOVING EVERY MINUTE OF IT


What did you get? I'm looking at that exact thing right now and trying to decide between the expensive Big Agnes Copper Spur or a cheap MEC one.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal


Oh poo poo, thanks for the heads up!

Pennywise the Frown posted:

The patagonia houdini and the marmot precip look kind of nice. That's pretty much what I'm looking for. A lightweight but breathable jacket. I do actually have a Frogg Toggs jacket/pants for emergencies. I guess I'm looking for something for when it's just drizzling on mild days. This is a good start.


I actually have a cat jacket that's really good in inclement weather. It's a bit beat up since I wear it regularly but it's a little heavy so I doubt I'll use it on the trail.


I have a bottle of that and I'm going to spray the poo poo out of everything before I go camping

I wouldn't recommend construction worker gear for hiking, especially Carhart stuff. Most of that is overbuilt for abrasion resistance, and uses some flavor of denim to achieve that. Denim is cotton, and cotton is bad, very very bad. It just absorbs water so you freeze to death in the cold, and never dry out when it's warm.


I like my marmot precip shell, I got it pretty cheap at REI because it was a previous year model closeout. Just remember with any waterproof breathable gear, it's breathable only to a theoretical extent. It's all the same kinda material, and you're going to get wet nomatter what, either from your perspiration or the rain. Just dress in layers so you can regulate your body temperature and you'll be good! And remember, sometimes the best time to go hiking is in the rain, don't let inclement weather predictions disrupt your plans. 75% of the time, forecasters are wrong anyways!


For ticks, you only get Lyme disease after they start regurgitating into your bloodstream, about 24 hours after latching. So, if you inspect yourself thoroughly after hiking, you can pry them off with a tick key and suffer no harm. They also hate peppermint oil, like the stuff in Dr. Bronner's magic soap--I'd recommend trying bathing with that before you go out of you're really concerned, and wear ankle length hiking pants since that's usually where they latch.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

OSU_Matthew posted:

For ticks, you only get Lyme disease after they start regurgitating into your bloodstream, about 24 hours after latching. So, if you inspect yourself thoroughly after hiking, you can pry them off with a tick key and suffer no harm. They also hate peppermint oil, like the stuff in Dr. Bronner's magic soap--I'd recommend trying bathing with that before you go out of you're really concerned, and wear ankle length hiking pants since that's usually where they latch.

I might have to try that Dr. Bronner's soap. I know they say to never do this but every single time I've gotten a tick on me I just pull the little bugger out. Never had anything stuck in there. I've never heard of a tick key. Do they work well? Better than tweezers or my fingers?

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Yeah, I have always just lifted a tick off with either my fingernails or my fishing pliers and they always are alive and squirming. I am actually very rarely find a tick that it is latched on, even an hour or so after a hike I'll feel them crawling on me and grab them.

I do think I have some kind of allergic reaction to tick bites, as every time I have found one latched on I get an angry red bump for a day or two. The two times I have gotten swarmed by nymph ticks and ended up with hundreds of angry red welts on my feet have had me wishing for some kind of at-home medically induced coma kit.

Chard
Aug 24, 2010






Dr Bronners is the poo poo and everyone should use it anyway

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Thanks to your guys' advice I ended up getting the Marmot PreCip Jacket from geartrader. $75 with free 2 day shipping. I looked around and everywhere just had great reviews for it.

I'm not usually a bright color guy but I like this one for some reason. Plus it might help someone locate me if I'm down face-first in a sewage drain.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Pennywise the Frown posted:


I'm not usually a bright color guy but I like this one for some reason. Plus it might help someone locate me if I'm down face-first in a sewage drain.

Rescue crews around here sometimes post on social media about how much they appreciate people wearing bright colours in the outdoors, it really helps with locating victims.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Oddly enough my serial killer listserv has guys posting the same thing!

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Picnic Princess posted:

Rescue crews around here sometimes post on social media about how much they appreciate people wearing bright colours in the outdoors, it really helps with locating victims.

Do they ever use locator beacons to find people in sewage drains? Maybe I should invest in one of those.


bongwizzard posted:

Oddly enough my serial killer listserv has guys posting the same thing!

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


bringer posted:

What did you get? I'm looking at that exact thing right now and trying to decide between the expensive Big Agnes Copper Spur or a cheap MEC one.

Brooks-Range Foray 3

Backcountry had it on sale, under 4 lbs for a decent sized 3 person backpacking tent, not bad. If I was going strictly car camping I'd probably go with a bigger and heavier tent but we're hoping to do some actual backpacking

thatguy
Feb 5, 2003


I'm confused why people are so loving duped about the polyester industrial complex saying that wicking fabrics keep you cool. They never ever keep you cool. There is literally no fabric better than cotton for hot summer months for shirts and pants/shorts. If you want to jabber about hypothermia or your wet crotch, fine w/e

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




thatguy posted:

I'm confused why people are so loving duped about the polyester industrial complex saying that wicking fabrics keep you cool. They never ever keep you cool. There is literally no fabric better than cotton for hot summer months for shirts and pants/shorts. If you want to jabber about hypothermia or your wet crotch, fine w/e

Don't listen to this guy.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

thatguy posted:

I'm confused why people are so loving duped about the polyester industrial complex saying that wicking fabrics keep you cool. They never ever keep you cool. There is literally no fabric better than cotton for hot summer months for shirts and pants/shorts. If you want to jabber about hypothermia or your wet crotch, fine w/e

I... Can't tell if you're trolling?

Either way, you are the only person I've ever met that thinks this. It's not even a point of contention.

E: Have science!

OSU_Matthew fucked around with this message at 02:21 on May 13, 2017

Morbus
May 18, 2004



thatguy posted:

I'm confused why people are so loving duped about the polyester industrial complex saying that wicking fabrics keep you cool. They never ever keep you cool. There is literally no fabric better than cotton for hot summer months for shirts and pants/shorts. If you want to jabber about hypothermia or your wet crotch, fine w/e

I mean you can have a whole separate discussion about why cotton may or may not be good as a hot weather base layer (I think it ultimately depends on whether its warm/dry enough to evaporate your sweat faster than you produce it) but I think the bigger issue is that most fancy synthetic/wool baselayers are marketed towards activities in climates where "staying cool" in just your baselayer is not a concern during any month of the year. People don't avoid cotton baselayers while backpacking because they are worried about staying cool, they avoid cotton because it becomes a soggy chaffing heavy and cold shitpile that takes forever to dry out.

meselfs
Sep 26, 2015

The body may die, but the soul is always rotten

why does this discussion is make me want to put on my five year old still fresh relaxed fit jeans and go climb something

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

So I was about to buy [http://thetentlab.com/Deuce/DeuceofSpadespage.html]the deuce of spades poop trowel[/url], but then I noticed on their site that they've got a really slick looking tent called the Moonlight Tent. Even though I'm a hammock guy, I kinda want to get a nice tent for places I'm going with other people that may not have great hammock sites and I'm not sure what tents the cool kids are using these days. Anyone heard of or used the moonlight tent? Is it worth the extra pound or two over the Copper Spur or MSR Hubba Hubba? Is there something better I should be looking at?

Bogan King
Jan 21, 2013

I'm not racist, I'm mates with Bangladesh, the guy who sells me kebabs. No, I don't know his real name.

OSU_Matthew posted:

So I was about to buy [http://thetentlab.com/Deuce/DeuceofSpadespage.html]the deuce of spades poop trowel[/url], but then I noticed on their site that they've got a really slick looking tent called the Moonlight Tent. Even though I'm a hammock guy, I kinda want to get a nice tent for places I'm going with other people that may not have great hammock sites and I'm not sure what tents the cool kids are using these days. Anyone heard of or used the moonlight tent? Is it worth the extra pound or two over the Copper Spur or MSR Hubba Hubba? Is there something better I should be looking at?

Just use a tarp. That way you can take your hammock tarp setup and if there isn't anything to setup off you can sleep under the stars or tarp if it looks sketchy. This advice applies great here where it never really gets cold so ymmv.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Bogan King posted:

Just use a tarp. That way you can take your hammock tarp setup and if there isn't anything to setup off you can sleep under the stars or tarp if it looks sketchy. This advice applies great here where it never really gets cold so ymmv.

That's actually exactly what I did last time I went to Grayson Highlands and was told by the everyone else that there wasn't a hammock spot. So, I brought my tarp and old bivy bag, which actually worked out fine despite it raining the whole weekend, but I figure for the same weight I could just get a small tent and have some more footbox comfort for my sasquatch feet.

Mainly I'm looking to paddle the Roanoke here in a few months and they've got little platforms your can rent and pitch a tent on right on the river, so the tarp is a no go there.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

I got my Marmot Precip today. It's a little loose as a large (I'm not used to saying that) but it looks and feels great. I love the color too. About $75 with free shipping. Perfect what my requirements. Thanks for the recommendations.

Epitope
Nov 27, 2006



Grimey Drawer

OSU_Matthew posted:

I... Can't tell if you're trolling?

Either way, you are the only person I've ever met that thinks this. It's not even a point of contention.

E: Have science!

Knyteguy
Jul 6, 2005

YES to love
NO to shirts




Toilet Rascal

Anyone have a recommendation for a sub $100 tent? They all about the same?

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

Never cotton when you are hiking. You can have a bandana, but don't gently caress around with that poo poo because it will cool your body down FAST if its raining or you slip and fall crossing a creek or something. It also takes FOREVER to dry.

Clothing is really environment dependent and if you are in a arid, dry area, cotton might be good, but even then, how many people go hiking in the desert? Dress for your environment, but there are a lot better options than cotton.

I hate recommending crazy gear for people, but when it comes to jackets, I used to always recommend Arcteryx. Their quality has gone down since moving operation to China, while their prices went up. Kinda lovely, but if you can find their Made in Canada stuff, then you know its quality. I've been using my Theta AR since 2009 and its held up beautiful. I've had to send it in once for a de-lamination in the interior of the jacket, but Arcteryx fixed it for free. Wash your jackets and re-waterproof them every year, or depending on how often/dirty they are.

Also, REI Anniversary sale going on soon. Not bad deals, but its basically same poo poo every year, just updates. Ask me about the real place to get deals from REI

ASSTASTIC fucked around with this message at 20:22 on May 17, 2017

Epitope
Nov 27, 2006



Grimey Drawer

ASSTASTIC posted:

Never cotton when you are hiking. You can have a bandana, but don't gently caress around with that poo poo because it will cool your body down FAST if its raining or you slip and fall crossing a creek or something. It also takes FOREVER to dry.

Clothing is really environment dependent and if you are in a arid, dry area, cotton might be good, but even then, how many people go hiking in the desert? Dress for your environment, but there are a lot better options than cotton.

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!


Difference between hiking in the desert and living in the desert. Also, cotton can chaff like a motherfucker.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Everyone being deliberately dense about cotton: knock it the gently caress off. Know what environment you're getting into and dress appropriately. I trust all of you are smart enough to be aware of the reasons why cotton is good for some environments and not others.

It works in dry deserts because hypothermia is less of a risk than hyperthermia and cotton is good at removing heat from your body. I wore cotton and nylon on an 8 day paddle through Canyonlands in summer because I knew it would be okay. Damp cotton was great at cooling us off under the blazing sun.

Granny trails and frontcountry trails in cooler climates are okay too because it's almost impossible to be out long enough alone to have your core temperature drop to dangerous levels without getting to your vehicle or getting help.

I will never wear anything cotton in the Rockies in the backcountry because this can happen any day of the year:



That was backpacking in the middle of July. It's not safe to wear a poor choice of materials just because I'm being stubborn or stupid or think I'm some hardcore badass. There's reasons we keep inventing better technologies. It makes life better. People can and do die here from exposure and they're often found with wet or frozen cotton layers that sapped all their heat and killed them. I'm not going to be one of those statistics. If I'm going to go, I'd better end up eaten by a bear.

Epitope
Nov 27, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Not sure if you're talking to me, so if not disregard
My backyard is similar, and if it's bluebird and 70F you might find me pretty far out in nothing but a small amount of cotton. Yes if I do a knee and can't make it back it could be serious, but choosing comfortable clothing is no more of a risk than many other backcountry choices we make. "Never cotton" is a fine rule of thumb, but I think we should be allowed to point out the exceptions.

meselfs
Sep 26, 2015

The body may die, but the soul is always rotten

Never travel by any means to a trailhead on roads, because someone could crash a motor vehicle into you and kill you. It happens more often than you might think.

Bogan King
Jan 21, 2013

I'm not racist, I'm mates with Bangladesh, the guy who sells me kebabs. No, I don't know his real name.

Given I live in a place that is shorts and t-shirts all year round this never cotton stuff is amazing. Dress for the area you're going to be, it's as simple as that.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Bogan King posted:

Given I live in a place that is shorts and t-shirts all year round this never cotton stuff is amazing. Dress for the area you're going to be, it's as simple as that.

Exactly. Dress for your conditions. There's different materials out there and they either work well or they don't. To say that cotton is a one-fits-all material is as stupid as saying cotton will guarantee kill you no matter what. It's as stupid as fighting over whether there's only one rule on how to layer for the entire planet.

Can we stop this stupid derail now?

Flambeau
Aug 5, 2015


Plaster Town Cop

I got a Columbia Omnishade booney hat recently and its usefulness far outweighs any vanity concerns.

thatguy
Feb 5, 2003


Picnic Princess posted:

Everyone being deliberately dense about cotton: knock it the gently caress off. Know what environment you're getting into and dress appropriately. I trust all of you are smart enough to be aware of the reasons why cotton is good for some environments and not others.

It works in dry deserts because hypothermia is less of a risk than hyperthermia and cotton is good at removing heat from your body. I wore cotton and nylon on an 8 day paddle through Canyonlands in summer because I knew it would be okay. Damp cotton was great at cooling us off under the blazing sun.

Granny trails and frontcountry trails in cooler climates are okay too because it's almost impossible to be out long enough alone to have your core temperature drop to dangerous levels without getting to your vehicle or getting help.

I will never wear anything cotton in the Rockies in the backcountry because this can happen any day of the year:



That was backpacking in the middle of July. It's not safe to wear a poor choice of materials just because I'm being stubborn or stupid or think I'm some hardcore badass. There's reasons we keep inventing better technologies. It makes life better. People can and do die here from exposure and they're often found with wet or frozen cotton layers that sapped all their heat and killed them. I'm not going to be one of those statistics. If I'm going to go, I'd better end up eaten by a bear.

They invent "new technologies" not to make anybody's life any better, but for you to vomit out another 50 dollars for new-age bullshit wicking fabrics when literally any polyester shirt and fleece will do fine for weather conditions. Congratulations, we had a mid-May Blizzard with 6 inches of snow and rain at 3k feet and much worse higher up while working. Shockingly enough, my 16 dollar 65/35 dickies survived even though they aren't ripstop wicking ultralight invented-name bullshit that REI sheep just eat up. I work backpacking 6 months a year, and most of you should be concerned less with jerking each other off about your latest goretex-covered 1.1 pound down bag you're buying for 700 dollars and more with getting absolutely everybody you ever see to go outside.

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

Epitope
Nov 27, 2006



Grimey Drawer

While we are ranting, I spent $$$$ this season to buy lighter versions of things I already had. Are they more fun? No, but capitalism has convinced everyone else we need them, so if you don't follow suit you get left behind

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


This really isn't the thread to rant about how you feel capitalism is forcing everyone to buy new poo poo they don't need. Make another thread if you want that discussion. Tired of people acting like dicks about stupid poo poo like this.

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Here's a non-derail related question. What do you guys use for lanterns? Preferably not crazy expensive ultralight stuff. A long time ago I got what I think is a Black Diamond Apollo Lantern.



It's nice and small but it doesn't throw out a ton of light. Also it doesn't work very well if I hang it in my REI Half Dome 2 HC (I think) because it doesn't throw light downwards. I've used those gas lamps with those cloth things in it that are SUPER loving bright but I think it's my parents and I have no clue where it is. Plus it's heavy and requires fuel which I really don't want at all. I have about 3 different headlamps too. I'm too lazy to stand up and walk to my basement to see which kind they are at this moment though.

I'll open the question a bit more just because I'm curious. What do you guys use for all of your lighting needs?

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


For backpacking or camping? Backpacking I just use a headlamp, but I'm also curious as to what good options there are for camping these days.

Epitope
Nov 27, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Levitate posted:

This really isn't the thread to rant about how you feel capitalism is forcing everyone to buy new poo poo they don't need. Make another thread if you want that discussion. Tired of people acting like dicks about stupid poo poo like this.

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3802060

Come shout into the wind with me, thatguy.

Also while i'm at it, post in the conservation thread too. (thanks others for the excellent posts in there)

Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Levitate posted:

For backpacking or camping? Backpacking I just use a headlamp, but I'm also curious as to what good options there are for camping these days.

For now just camping. I don't think I'd be too concerned with a lantern if I were backpacking. If anything, that Apollo lamp is nice because it folds to a size just a bit larger than a soda can. I'd like a nice "basecamp" lantern for camping.

Chard
Aug 24, 2010






I have and love a Luci Inflatable Lantern. I like that it collapses down to the size of a few CDs, recharges in the sun and can be clipped to your pack while you hike, puts out lots of light and is lightweight enough to hang in a tent. They also make funky colored ones if you're into camping.

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Pennywise the Frown
May 10, 2010



Upset Trowel

Holy poo poo that thing is crazy. Definitely looking into that.

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