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Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

I just had a cabinet builtin added to my living room, and I love it (underfull though it is). I wanted lights that could do a couple of colour temperatures, so we ended up with 4 strips of RGB LEDs. My contractor left them on a slow random transition one day, and I loved it so much that it's been that way ever since. Every time I walk into the room it's a different set of colours, like some mutable piece of art.

I hope it's not tacky, because I'm sticking to it.

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WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Subjunctive posted:

I just had a cabinet builtin added to my living room, and I love it (underfull though it is). I wanted lights that could do a couple of colour temperatures, so we ended up with 4 strips of RGB LEDs. My contractor left them on a slow random transition one day, and I loved it so much that it's been that way ever since. Every time I walk into the room it's a different set of colours, like some mutable piece of art.

I hope it's not tacky, because I'm sticking to it.



It's so fun! PARTY LIGHTS!

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Honestly now I'm a little nervous to post our actual design for our new fireplace!

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Bad Munki posted:

Honestly now I'm a little nervous to post our actual design for our new fireplace!

No do it! Only constructive criticism for poster's projects. Unless you're a dick, but it's easy to not be a dick!

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


I think this has a lot of overlap with Gooncave & Gardens in A/T -- it might be worth crosslinking or something?

Anyway I'm here to say I love Hollywood regency. I loved it before it was a fad, I will love it when the fad is gone, I'm very sad that it'll start looking (is already looking) dated, because oh boy am I about glamour and detail and textures and lacquer and geometry and mirrors and silver and, uh, non-minimalism.

e: and chandeliers omg it's a sickness

Anne Whateley fucked around with this message at 02:54 on May 10, 2017

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Okay, well, here's what we started with when we moved in less than a year ago The previous owners had a tendency to DIY poo poo and only to the most basic level so they could say they had a feature. There's a general theme of low effort and poor execution. At best the effort went skin deep, but often enough it didn't even get that far. Still, the house has, imo, a ton of potential, and I'm willing to fund improvements, at least for the time being. We might call it a wash and build from scratch in a couple years after my wife's student loans are paid off. But for now, let's make this place nicer.

So here's the original fireplace installation. Excuse the couch fort and whatnot, these pictures were not intended for public consumption and we have a couple roommates, one is 3 and the other is 5. They don't even pay rent.



Of note: the back of those bookshelves is leftover wainscoting from the worst wainscoting job ever in the basement. When I need a stress relief, I rip a couple pieces of that off downstairs, slowly working toward THAT project's completion. The shelves are poo poo. And ugly. Like, they couldn't even line up the fuckin' knobs on the cabinet doors? Okay whatever. Lick & stick stone, but who needs thinset? Construction adhesive is FINE. And a mantel above it all that doesn't even meet the stone. Or the wall, to be honest: it's sitting on its lag bolts about a 1/2" out from the wall. I should get a closeup of the ends of the hearth down there, they just sorta...quit.

So we stared at that for a while trying to decide what to do. For a while we envisioned stone work going right up the 18' wall to the ceiling but the windows above really don't allow for that and contrary to some DIY expert bathroom remodelers, we weren't willing to close those windows, they're south-facing and provide some really awesome light throughout the day. So eventually, we worked toward this really, really bad, and not-at-all-to-scale sketch of an idea:



Here you can see the large mantelpiece across the top, the bump out with stone across the face, the walnut posts at each end that the bump out stone work will return on to, the hearth, the cabinets, and the granite surround. And a fire that's gotten way out of control, now that I look at it. Like I said, it's not to scale, the actual thing is a touch over 14' wide. The mantel will be the widest extent on the whole thing, and will stop shy of the wall on either end by just an inch or two. The posts will stop an inch or two in from that, leaving a few inches between the fireplace and the wall such that a vacuum can still reach in there. This house also features a dog and a cat along with the aforementioned roommates, so being able to clean effectively is clutch.

Here's the stone we're currently planning on using.



It's a natural stone, it'll be veneer thickness but the bump out should give it a ton of extra depth. We went with that one because the colors are right, and the shape of the stone very nicely matches the shape of the entire installation, and the size is nice, each stone roughly as tall as the mantel will be thick. In that picture you can also see an example live-edge slab, I think that one is 3" on the nose, ours will be 4". And, like, way the hell longer, because it's capping the whole installation off, from end to end. We won't have the arch over the fireplace, ours is straight, and we haven't decided on whether we'll have the line of soldiers or not, but otherwise it's a fair picture of what we're doing.

Also, that super heavy dark grey wall paint will be exorcised. Best I can guess, the previous owners, in their infinite wisdom, used that color to cover up some REALLY BAD DECISIONS regarding colors on their way to selling the house. In the 8 months I've been here, doing various minor improvements and such, I've come across almost every variant of "baby poo poo" paint you can think of. We're talking breast milk baby poo poo, neon carrots baby poo poo, tomato sauce baby poo poo, and just plain old bog-standard baby poo poo. I think they slapped this on because it would very easily cover up their shame. And when I say slapped, I mean it, it's not a good paint job, I think it was done in a hurry. So part of our work here will be to prime preeeeeetty much this entire floor with Kilz or something similar, because very few paints would actually be able to cover that, and then paint everything with a nicer, friendlier color. We're staying with grey, but we're taking it both softer, lighter, and warmer. This picture surely doesn't really show it, but the second swatch up from the bottom:



The pic makes it look darker than it is, in person it's kind of a nice warm silver with a hint--and I do mean just a hint--of pink/purple. Definitely not brown or beige, it's not taupe, not quite, but in the right light, it can be very striking, and in other light, it's just a soft warm grey. Very neutral and unassuming, which I think will prove to be important when coupled with the visual magnitude of this feature we're putting in as the center point of pretty much the entire floor.

So here's a super comically bad photoshop I did of the planned fireplace. Still not to scale, doesn't extend as far toward the walls as it will, doesn't show the bump out or the right type of cabinets or the new wall color or whatever we end up choosing for the hearth. It was more just for us to look at and get a basic sense of what we're chasing. And after doing that, once we wiped the tears from our eyes from laughing at this quality shopsmanship, we're still fully on board with this thing, so I guess that's good.



Oh also I think we're going to redo the stairs in walnut and black iron, and the floors will likely be replaced with hickory, which we like a lot, is lighter/brighter, and doesn't show scratches and animal fur as readily.

So there ya go, be gentle, we've spent a lot of time and energy (but technically no dosh yet ) on this so far and I don't think I can

bEatmstrJ posted:

handle the wrath of the internet
in the raw

(But I'm definitely will to discuss and consider suggestions)

Bad Munki fucked around with this message at 03:21 on May 10, 2017

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Bad Munki posted:



Oh also I think we're going to redo the stairs in walnut and black iron, and the floors will likely be replaced with hickory, which we like a lot, is lighter/brighter, and doesn't show scratches and animal fur as readily.

That's going to be lovely I think

And A+ top-quality blanket fort. For anyone looking for fort construction tips, I highly recommend enhancing your cardboard box variety with a stick-on LED light like they make for closets. Huge hit every time.

When people were posting random designs back in the bathroom thread, there was a room with drawers under the fireplace like that and a lot of people were surprised to see it. Do you have any limitations to what you can store down there? Will the drawers get hot?

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



The manual for the fireplace says anything at or below the hearth is A-okay for combustibles. Part of the reason for the surround is that, even aside from the space that allows for noncombustibles, there can't be ANYTHING within a certain space there, so in order to have the bump out, we had to move it higher up, which meant a surround. Which proved to be a happy accident, because it makes that void more proportional to the rest of the thing.

Here we go, took me a minute to find it, but:

Overhang requirements:



Hearth requirements:



So re: hearth cabinets, basically this thing can be installed right over whatever the heck you want, as long as it's directly on an appropriate plate, but the hearth itself is whatever. In our case, it'll be a couple few inches of stone atop the cabinets, so we should be golden. And the bump out will be framed in steel.

Facebook Aunt
Oct 4, 2008

a cat




Ham Wrangler

Baronjutter posted:

I seriously get a facial tick every time I see a house that has BIG and INSPIRATIONAL words on their wall about LOVE and LIFE are the MEANING for FAMILY.
We were staying at an Airbnb that had that poo poo all over and I seriously wanted to take them down for our stay because they enraged and disgusted me every time I saw them and i can't wait for that trend to die, well it's officially dead because it's not the early 2000's anymore but people haven't gotten the message yet.

It's like working at an office that unironically posts "successory" posters all over telling me to work hard or attain my career goals. I don't need a loving sign in my house telling me to love life creatively or that happiness and joy are found in a house filled with family and love.

I like them, if only for the insane and surreal attempts they inspire in aliexpress. Kinda feels like home decor designed by space aliens.


https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Col...2690092798.html
No idea what god, but he'll be with you.



https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Swe...2763998292.html
Who would put this up? What would putting this in your own home mean?



https://www.aliexpress.com/item/sta...2595099174.html
I'm not saying there is no one who wants a large sith decal on their wall, but staging it with tulips is bizarre. And why is it made to look like a fake window?




https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Hug...2663949905.html
Why have an armoire when you could have a full size picture of an armoire instead? It takes up just as much space, but provides no useful storage!

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on



Why is there a fawn sat in a bowl of oranges?

Progressive JPEG
Feb 19, 2003




Amelie 2 set design lookin good



Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


learnincurve posted:

Why is there a fawn sat in a bowl of oranges?

You wouldn't need to ask that if the god was with you

Facebook Aunt
Oct 4, 2008

a cat




Ham Wrangler

learnincurve posted:

Why is there a fawn sat in a bowl of oranges?
Where do you keep your fawns?


Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

You wouldn't need to ask that if the god was with you

hexwren
Feb 27, 2008



WrenP-Complete posted:

(Though i hate bare bulbs, omg)

This is the worst episode of Desert Island Discs ever. Who owns four albums?

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Allen Wren posted:

This is the worst episode of Desert Island Discs ever. Who owns four albums?

I think it's like a retro loss edit.

COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003

If we vanished tomorrow, no organism on this planet would miss us.
Nothing in nature needs us.




Buglord

Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

And A+ top-quality blanket fort. For anyone looking for fort construction tips, I highly recommend enhancing your cardboard box variety with a stick-on LED light like they make for closets. Huge hit every time.

I didn't even think of that! I just got a pack of those stick on lights and now I really want to make a blanket fort in our living room.

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

Yeah, that's brilliant.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



A friend just showed me this: http://www.worstroom.com/ a blog about trying to find affordable housing. (I've lived in London, SF, NYC, now live in the more affordable (ha!) Washington DC area.)

Here's a picture of a bedroom for rent:


PS Bad Munki your idea looks awesome!

Shadownerd
Aug 2, 2007
Fabricati Diem, Pvnc.

Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

Something I'd buy if I could afford it, even though it's ridiculous:

15,000 earth dollars and I'd have nowhere to put it, but prettyyyyyy...

So what do you like? What do you hate? What did you gently caress up trying to replicate in DIY? What are the design element dealbreakers when you look at a new place (popcorn ceilings and sliding shower doors, for me).

If you're into DIY Jo-Ann Fabrics have individual metal tropical leaves for sale in with their summer stuff and you could either find a simple gold lamp like this or find a black one and spray paint it gold to match, then stick a bunch of the metal leaves on top with e6000 or something. Just a thought!

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Shadownerd posted:

If you're into DIY Jo-Ann Fabrics have individual metal tropical leaves for sale in with their summer stuff and you could either find a simple gold lamp like this or find a black one and spray paint it gold to match, then stick a bunch of the metal leaves on top with e6000 or something. Just a thought!

Cool, thank you! I'll have to see if we have Jo-Ann Fabrics around here.

Shadownerd
Aug 2, 2007
Fabricati Diem, Pvnc.

They might have them online, too!

Dirt Road Junglist
Oct 8, 2010

There's a ghost in me
Who wants to say I'm sorry
Doesn't mean I'm sorry






This is what my mom does: http://nancyswoodndesigns.com/

Which is only relevant because her first 3 books were published by the same imprint that published Frank and Judy Bilec's "Mosey n Me" books. Frank, my mom, the publisher's wife, and another lady who does primitive Americana designs were their first four artists. Turned out to be an unprofitable shitshow overall, but I did get to meet Frank at a tole painting conference, and he was super nice. Not my style of crafts, but I'm biased toward more detailed and cartoony stuff like my mom designs.

My parents dragged me to every open house and builder showcase in a 1500 mile radius when I was a kid, so I should hate this poo poo, but now that I have my own place I Get It. Gonna try and hit up Street of Dreams in Portland this summer and see if my roommate and I can get more ideas for the house we're looking to purchase next year. Last year was all houses in Lake Osewego. Not sure they can top that this year.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Lake Oswego is certainly special.

Edit: That sounds snarkier than I meant it to. Lake Oswego is an interesting mix of houses, in one of the most affluent suburbs of Portland.

WrenP-Complete fucked around with this message at 12:53 on May 11, 2017

Dirt Road Junglist
Oct 8, 2010

There's a ghost in me
Who wants to say I'm sorry
Doesn't mean I'm sorry






WrenP-Complete posted:

Lake Oswego is certainly special.

Edit: That sounds snarkier than I meant it to. Lake Oswego is an interesting mix of houses, in one of the most affluent suburbs of Portland.

Yeah, the racist joke goes, what do you call a black person in Lake Oswego? A Trailblazer.

I have a cousin who moved to LO. Not wealthy, but reasonably well-to-do. The house they bought has a climate controlled wine cellar that can hold something like 300 bottles and is bigger than my apartment's master bedroom. They weren't really wine people, but since it's there and can't really be repurposed effectively, they've started paying attention to what they stock. They gettin' fancy.

Also, my predatory, unstable former landlady grew up in LO, because her mom owns Pendleton. It explains everything.

Progressive JPEG
Feb 19, 2003



DirtRoadJunglist posted:

I have a cousin who moved to LO. Not wealthy, but reasonably well-to-do. The house they bought has a climate controlled wine cellar that can hold something like 300 bottles and is bigger than my apartment's master bedroom.

I once had a coworker who was really into wine that owned a small house in San Jose. He had insured the contents of his wine cellar instead of the house itself, with the reasoning that any insurance payout would effectively cover everything else

cheese eats mouse
Jul 6, 2007



This is my aesthetic for a kitchen. I want bright and vibrant and that backsplash . I like having cooking things at the ready. I have some things hanging on my wall above the sink because I lack countertop space. I wouldn't do that red everywhere, just on that main wall with the stove.

I'm going to crosspost my grandma's time capsule bathroom from the sexist bathroom thread. She's 84 and her house hasn't changed since the 70s and since I've been alive it's always amazingly clean. Bonus tiled countertops. Honestly I love it and wouldn't change a thing, but probably because she's kept it in tip-top shape.

Off camera there is storage space for towels and even a dirty clothes bin built in.





How would you update it? I'd try to save the cabinets and get ride of the tiled counter tops. I might have some nostalgia though and that's why I'm loathe to change it.

beep-beep car is go
Apr 11, 2005

I can just eyeball this, right?



When I see that kitchen, all I hear is "I love how much my dishes are covered in sticky greasy dust all the time!"

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


beep-beep car is go posted:

When I see that kitchen, all I hear is "I love how much my dishes are covered in sticky greasy dust all the time!"

What kind of kitchens do you like? I like them on the sterile laboratory side myself

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


beep-beep car is go posted:

When I see that kitchen, all I hear is "I love how much my dishes are covered in sticky greasy dust all the time!"

Same, I was staying with a friend who had a cluttered "country kitchen" mess like that and it seemed impossible to clean. We made a cake and everything hanging exposed like that got a slight dusting of flour, everything cooking near the stove got slightly greasy, and everything was a huge pain to clean because you had to move everything off the counter, which they never did, so every countertop appliance was glued to the counter from generic stickyness.

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



beep-beep car is go posted:

When I see that kitchen, all I hear is "I love how much my dishes are covered in sticky greasy dust all the time!"

I really want to know the backstory on your red text, it's fascinating.

beep-beep car is go
Apr 11, 2005

I can just eyeball this, right?


Bad Munki posted:

I really want to know the backstory on your red text, it's fascinating.

I "won" a dorkroom photo contest. I fully deserved it, so I kept the text.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Baronjutter posted:

Same, I was staying with a friend who had a cluttered "country kitchen" mess like that and it seemed impossible to clean. We made a cake and everything hanging exposed like that got a slight dusting of flour, everything cooking near the stove got slightly greasy, and everything was a huge pain to clean because you had to move everything off the counter, which they never did, so every countertop appliance was glued to the counter from generic stickyness.

I love this one (tho not those chairs)

Also this yurt house is cool.

Progressive JPEG
Feb 19, 2003



That first one looks like it was already back out of fashion before they finished the photo shoot tbh

Followup question: What sorts of styles actually last? We're thinking about doing a large remodel in a couple years and I'm always worried that whatever we put in will be out of fashion shortly afterwards

Progressive JPEG fucked around with this message at 21:12 on May 12, 2017

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Progressive JPEG posted:

That first one looks like it was already back out of fashion before they finished the photo shoot tbh

What kind of kitchens do you like?

I like that it's simple and has counter space, light, natural elements and looks easy to clean/see if it's dirty. (I used to be a live in nanny for a family with a 5 year old, 3 year old, and four 1.5 year olds, so my fear of hidden messes is very real.)

To respond to your follow up question: I don't know if this is a good way to gauge things, but what kind of kitchens are in houses for sale in your area?

I also like many things in this photo:

WrenP-Complete fucked around with this message at 21:22 on May 12, 2017

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Simple clean modern designs are pretty timeless. My friend re-did his kitchen and did it with, what I consider, ridiculously old fashioned 80's grandma style. He's a woodworker and knows his stuff, but every single cabinet door was a very finely done mess of arches and bevels and details and then left quite light and woody looking for finish. But just because you're good at woodworking doesn't mean you've got good taste.

I think designs like this will feel dated and even silly eventually


While something like this will remain fine for a long time, although boring


Goofy poo poo like this underlighting belongs in a restaurant, not a household kitchen and will probably end up breaking and not getting fixed and looking like poo poo years later.


A simple modern design like this will most likely hold up well too, although I'd have done something a little different with the back of that island.


This small apartment kitchen (still about 2x as big as mine...) is pretty timeless and will hold up fine.


But I think fake wood like this will be an instant tell for "2010 kitchen" because seriously every new condo I've seen in the last 10 years or so has had some variety of this design and that fake grainy wood

Baronjutter fucked around with this message at 21:42 on May 12, 2017

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


I have started to really dislike counter island seating after too many years in cramped apartments where that was the only option. I think a lot of design trends are reactionary like that - luxury to me is a dining room table and the space to put it in. People went nuts for granite countertops after laminate became the cheapo standard.

I think natural materials will always age better than engineered ones (from a style perspective at least. Ask me about my finicky pet, a butcher-block prep table), and less adornment better than more. There's a similar principle in fashion - 60s styles never fully go out of style because they fit close to the body, and the human body always makes sense to us aesthetically. Styles that obscure the shape of the body tend to go out of fashion faster and look silly, because the reference point is lost.

So I think if you're designing a kitchen now that you want to age well, focus on the design "speaking" to the basic functions of the kitchen - wash, prep, cook. Kitchens that try to "say" "we entertain so much our place is practically a restaurant" or "we're exquisitely modern and only eat things that have been microwaved sous vided" are gambling that future buyers will want to say the same things about themselves.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

I have started to really dislike counter island seating after too many years in cramped apartments where that was the only option. I think a lot of design trends are reactionary like that - luxury to me is a dining room table and the space to put it in. People went nuts for granite countertops after laminate became the cheapo standard.

I think natural materials will always age better than engineered ones (from a style perspective at least. Ask me about my finicky pet, a butcher-block prep table), and less adornment better than more. There's a similar principle in fashion - 60s styles never fully go out of style because they fit close to the body, and the human body always makes sense to us aesthetically. Styles that obscure the shape of the body tend to go out of fashion faster and look silly, because the reference point is lost.

So I think if you're designing a kitchen now that you want to age well, focus on the design "speaking" to the basic functions of the kitchen - wash, prep, cook. Kitchens that try to "say" "we entertain so much our place is practically a restaurant" or "we're exquisitely modern and only eat things that have been microwaved sous vided" are gambling that future buyers will want to say the same things about themselves.

I read an article a while back about different kitchen arrangements and different kinds of cooking - like baking or chopping vegetables (I can't remember) or whatever. I wish I had saved it. My dad and his girlfriend (both Argentine) are always running out of counter space making pastas by hand.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Agreed, "centre island with bar seating on cool ultra-contemporary seats" is like a checkbox every new "luxury" kitchen just has to have and they'll put that in at the expense of actually having space for a proper little dining table. Sometimes even at the expense of the functionality of the kitchen itself because there was never room for an island in the first place because it's a loving 800 sqft condo.

And yeah, kitchen design should be functional. I've tried doing real cooking in some McMansion style kitchens that look good but were clearly not designed by anyone who ever cooks. There was no efficiency of motion, you had to walk steps and steps to go between common tasks because there was so much wasted open space, yet counter space didn't exist next to the locations you actually did need it. All because it was designed for looks, symmetry, not actual cooking.

Baronjutter fucked around with this message at 22:05 on May 12, 2017

elise the great
May 1, 2012

NECROTIC BUTTSLOUGH


I rent a condo that's been the tragic victim of multiple trendy renovations and has so many different types and colors of granite that I lost count at eight. Seafoam granite bathroom walls with pink and pure-black granite details, pink-shot black granite vanities, olive-shot black kitchen counters with mica, chessboard black-and-white entryway flooring with complementary white-and-black flecks, a beige-and-gray large-grain fireplace, and a truly repulsive rust-and-olive doorstop in the entryway that we actually removed just for its sheer ugliness. The dark kitchen counters are so gross they cause me physical pain, and combined with a high bar-style countertop separating the kitchen from the rest of the living space, the whole mess makes an uncomfortable and poorly-lit food prep space that will never, ever look good.

The floor is cherry-wood and the counters are mid-grade oak finish. The crown molding is Federal-ish and the windows and doors are flat glass with weird fluted trim plus Southwest-style medallion corner accents. The fireplace is Art Deco. There is track lighting and recessed lighting and inset crown-molding lighting and a contemporary chandelier that we mostly disassembled and tied to the ceiling in shame. All the fixtures are brushed stainless steel.

It's such a mess I can't gently caress it up any worse, so it's actually kind of relaxing to live in. "Does this giant cardboard triceratops head look silly beside the 1880s cherry drop-leaf table and the Ikea lamps?" "Who cares, everything clashes anyway."

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Coca Koala
Nov 28, 2005

ongoing nowhere


College Slice

Baronjutter posted:

I think designs like this will feel dated and even silly eventually



What do you think is going to look dated and silly about this? The only thing that really strikes me as objectionable is the stools, although I guess I'm not certain how I feel about the cupboards as well. I am not used to looking at things with an eye towards how they might fare in the changing aesthetics of the future, so I'm curious what you're seeing that I'm not.

I've recently started thinking about what sorts of things I would want in my own home, so I'll be following this thread closely for design ideas.

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