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Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Coca Koala posted:

What do you think is going to look dated and silly about this? The only thing that really strikes me as objectionable is the stools, although I guess I'm not certain how I feel about the cupboards as well. I am not used to looking at things with an eye towards how they might fare in the changing aesthetics of the future, so I'm curious what you're seeing that I'm not.

I've recently started thinking about what sorts of things I would want in my own home, so I'll be following this thread closely for design ideas.

The pendant lights for sure, the horizontal wood grain, goofy giant faucet, super-thick counter slab, and eventually the ravages of time are going to turn those nice shiny stainless steel appliances into "ew it's like the 2010s in here, we have to rip this all out"

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beep-beep car is go
Apr 11, 2005

I can just eyeball this, right?


Coca Koala posted:

What do you think is going to look dated and silly about this? The only thing that really strikes me as objectionable is the stools, although I guess I'm not certain how I feel about the cupboards as well.

I can't speak for others, but the wood color and the style of cabinets - while simple - is pretty striking. Striking usually means dated in a few years.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


beep-beep car is go posted:

I can't speak for others, but the wood color and the style of cabinets - while simple - is pretty striking. Striking usually means dated in a few years.

Yeah it's not so much "this is objectively ugly, avoid" as a reminder to renovate for what you personally like, because there's no such thing as a futureproof remodel. The only thing that might come close is if you live in a historical home and restore a room to period-appropriate style.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Hm I'll take a look tomorrow and see if I can find one I love that's less trendy looking. I used to live in a historic home with a remodeled kitchen I adored (except for marble counters) and it was very simple and very classic.

RobotDogPolice
Dec 1, 2016


I'm not sure what to do with our living room. The TV stand doesn't fit on the mantle, so we're going to get it mounted on the wall, preferably with one that allows us to lower the TV closer to eye level. The closest outlet is on the adjacent wall, so we might try installing a new outlet as well. We eventually plan on getting some small speakers too. How much does it usually cost to have an electrician install an outlet and route some cables? The lamp and the end table are what we have on hand. I'll eventually shop around for something nicer. I'm not wild about the pillows, the yellow ones are pretty limp and the fuzzy ones feel weird.

Also, I'm not a fan of the grey shades, and I'd like to get some curtains. Any ideas as to what colors will work, or where I can go for ideas? Is the space to small for a coffee table or a rug?

RobotDogPolice fucked around with this message at 07:04 on May 13, 2017

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


RobotDogPolice posted:

I'm not sure what to do with our living room. The TV stand doesn't fit on the mantle, so we're going to get it mounted on the wall, preferably with one that allows us to lower the TV closer to eye level. The closest outlet is on the adjacent wall, so we might try installing a new outlet as well. We eventually plan on getting some small speakers too. How much does it usually cost to have an electrician install an outlet and route some cables? The lamp and the end table are what we have on hand. I'll eventually shop around for something nicer. I'm not wild about the pillows, the yellow ones are pretty limp and the fuzzy ones feel weird.

Also, I'm not a fan of the grey shades, and I'd like to get some curtains. Any ideas as to what colors will work, or where I can go for ideas? Is the space to small for a coffee table or a rug?



This is a great room to work with! Lovely floors and nice sunlight

Do you ever light the fireplace? That affects your curtain choices since the window's kind of close. I always feel like you can't go wrong with a shade + gauzey tie-back curtains combo, so you can block out all light or just have some diffusion for privacy.

What about a jute shade?


Or roman blinds:


I'm a big fan of using window treatments for color since they get so nice and translucent like this, but you can of course find them in any neutral you'd want too

I see a coatrack behind the couch - I assume that's the entryway area back there? Would it be at all possible to push the couch back so it's not blocking the window, and move the rack or hang hooks on another wall? That would give you enough space for a coffee table and let the window be more of a showpiece.

I think mounting the TV with a height adjustment arm is a great idea. Instead of separate speakers you might look at a slim-profile soundbar that can just sit on the mantel there.

For electricity, what's on the other side of the fireplace wall? If it's a room with outlets on that side I think that makes it a little less expensive to install them on this side.

Hambilderberglar
Dec 2, 2004



Thanks for making this thread, I'm immensely enjoying the little differences in stylistic preferences that I don't see here in Europe (as often) and the glimpse into what people are finding beautiful where they live. Which brings me to...

Baronjutter posted:

This small apartment kitchen (still about 2x as big as mine...) is pretty timeless and will hold up fine.


Looking at that kitchen, all I can see is the tile back splash which uses the exact same tile as literally every housing project built in the early 90s that I grew up in.
If I never see a white tile in those proportions again it will be too soon, and it already looks super dated to me as it is now.

Style trends where I am now tends heavily towards the whole "found furniture" aesthetic and 50-70 year old use objects like old school desks and worn wood being ridiculously hip:


I'm not wild about this aesthetic, but maybe the problem is me.

As for kitchens I am a bigly fan of concepts like this:

Except with stainless steel worktops. Sink is directly welded in and it's so, so cleanable. My girlfriend thinks it looks like a 23rd century auto-shop so I'm still fighting that fight.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Requesting your thoughts on bathrooms.

The house is getting a full renovation so the bathrooms can go back in however I want. Current plan is to have a shower room downstairs next to the guest bedroom for their use and general downstairs needs. My instinct is to replace the original upstairs bathroom which had a really tiny bath with another shower room, entrance close to the master bedroom but not fully en suite so it can be used from upstairs in general.

Resale value and the preferences of people who aren't me is in the back of my mind, since this would leave the house with no bath. I don't use baths myself but how much of it is a dealbreaker when selling? (I hear they make women swoon)

Should I have it done with only me in mind and deal with it come time to sell? This isn't a house for flipping, but I probably won't be here for decades.

Should I rearrange rooms so I can have a good shower and a bath? The current planned layout of the upstairs back of the house is like this, though none of it is.. set in stone:


The front-to-back wall is probably going to have to go back in this location because of the drop in ceiling height, but I've put a beam in so it's not structural. The flat roof to the right may have to be replaced due to mould and if it does I might be able to level them out, but no guarantee.
The room to the bottom is planned as an office. The room to the right for instruments etc, becomes a bedroom on sale. The top-left room is the existing bathroom shape, there's a window missing from the model in the left wall.

Anything I should take into account when laying out the bathrooms that might be outside my experience? e.g. I don't have long hair, don't wear makeup, don't shave my legs etc.

Any current bathroom trends that I should avoid either for practical or fad reasons?

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



No bathtub is a total deal breaker for parents with kids, maybe less so kids out of elementary, but definitely with toddlers and preschoolers and early elementary kids.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Bad Munki posted:

No bathtub is a total deal breaker for parents with kids, maybe less so kids out of elementary, but definitely with toddlers and preschoolers and early elementary kids.

I hadn't even thought about kids. I guess in that situation even a short bath is better than nothing.

One option I have is to convert the office over to a full bathroom when it comes time to sell, though that loses a "bedroom", or rejig the shower room into a bath-with-shower-head, or take a hit on the price though I suspect the hassle factor for a buyer would require an extra premium.

Edit: plus many of my friends have had kids recently, so accommodating them when they visit is worth something.

Jaded Burnout fucked around with this message at 13:22 on May 14, 2017

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Yeah, sorry, just wanted to make sure you didn't eliminate a significant portion of your market without even realizing it.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Bad Munki posted:

Yeah, sorry, just wanted to make sure you didn't eliminate a significant portion of your market without even realizing it.

No that sort of thing is exactly what I'm looking for. I can make a perfect place for me but apparently there are assholes in the world with different needs, the pricks.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Oh man, trying to find example images for this thread has made me realize that I both love modern farmhouse style done well and HATE it done badly.

Caveat: I hate bare bulbs in all cases.

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Arachnamus posted:

...there are assholes in the world...the pricks.

As a kid-haver, I can tell you that at the very least, you're using the standard nomenclature.

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

Hambilderberglar posted:

As for kitchens I am a bigly fan of concepts like this:

Except with stainless steel worktops. Sink is directly welded in and it's so, so cleanable. My girlfriend thinks it looks like a 23rd century auto-shop so I'm still fighting that fight.

Look at that staircase! Riserless glass treads? I have a mild phobia of see-through floors and riserless stairs, so combining those makes me very uncomfortable. They're like a more terrifying version of these stairs at the Des Moines Art Center, which I had a very hard time with.



They look awesome though.

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


By "shower room," do you mean a total wet room? If you're in the US, those are really unusual, and a lot of people strongly dislike them. Having used one, I'm not a fan either; I would do whatever had to be done for the other options.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Anne Whateley posted:

By "shower room," do you mean a total wet room? If you're in the US, those are really unusual, and a lot of people strongly dislike them. Having used one, I'm not a fan either; I would do whatever had to be done for the other options.

I meant the equivalent of a bathroom but with the shower being the focus rather than the bath, i.e. shower, toilet, sink etc. The actual form the shower takes isn't that important but I wouldn't go for the complete water-everywhere style, the most I'd go in that direction would be a glass partition and change in tiling rather than a full shower tray.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

I have a mild phobia of see-through floors and riserless stairs, so combining those makes me very uncomfortable.

The Architect and builder tried to get me to go for riserless stairs because of the light and sightlines in the house and while that would sure be nice I really don't like them. I always feel like I'm going to catch my ankles.

The Apple stores in London have glass slab riserless stairs and it's very unpleasant even with the frosting.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Riser less stairs are pretty much not allowed by the building code here and lots of fussy architects get pissed off that those pencil pushers are getting in the way of their amazing artistic vision and oh my god they are demanding railings too?????

elise the great
May 1, 2012

NECROTIC BUTTSLOUGH


The problem with wet rooms is that I like wearing fluffy slipper socks and a bathrobe after I finish a shower, which means I have to UGH GET DRESSED and/or take off my socks to pee on the weekends when there's no reason to rush out the door after a scrub.

Elendil004
Mar 22, 2003

The prognosis
is not good.



I'm looking to remodel both my bathrooms. My house is a modular, 1983-build and it's just dated. I have a decent idea what I want to do but really looking for clever ideas, things I haven't thought of, pitfalls, etc. I'll be doing most of the work with a family friend who has been building for his entire adult life so the work will be overdone, no code issues, no I-beams to saw through, etc. That said, if you see something, say something.

The main bathroom:



As you can see, dated vanity, old tub, garish wallpaper, awful cabinet, basic non-tile floor.

This is the only window, which is pretty awful but I don't want to do much with it, I don't want to get into the shingles on the outside of the house so I plan on leaving this window.

Basic idea is wainscoting around the side, probably go pretty high without looking silly. Replace the tub/shower, new toilet, new vanity.

With regards to vanity, I really don't know what I want there. This one is hideous, but I don't know what I like or what will look good. Wide open to ideas here.

Color wise, probably white wainscoting, but the wall maybe a light grey, or light blue possible. My living room/main room is a sage green.

Master Bathroom. This is a tight space right now, but I am getting another maybe a foot, or two depth in the shower by knocking the wall down behind it and eating up a stupid hallway closet.


View from my bedroom, shower is in and to the left. Right now I have no door there, but that's just because it frustrated me. I am considering a barn door that slides. To the left is a closet so it could either cover the closet or the bathroom, might be neat.

From the shower looking down. I plan on putting a really thin profile ikea sink in place of the vanity in here, so I'll get some room there. That would let me open the doorway up so it's less narrow, but may not need to. This toilet will remain, it's pretty new.

The shower, again, just dated. Going to tear it out and put in a tile one. Hopefully I don't have to make the pan by hand.

For both bathroom floors I'll do a tile, but not sure if I should go big tile or smaller tile, design or not, I'm still looking at all sorts of design stuff online amd open to suggestions here.

Couple of other design choices. Only the main bathroom has an exhaust fan, so considering adding one to the master, maybe finding a way to route them both into the same stack (less holes in the roof).

I will probably have to do a full gut on both, doubt I can save any of the walls, and the ceiling is popcorn so getting rid of it is doing humanity a favor. The ease of being able to do any electrical work or plumbing work in the open vice from the attic outweighs have to re-sheetrock I think.

I have all electric heat, but am looking at electric mats for under the tile. Heated floors are nice and classy and I'm going to have it all up already, but it'd have to run on the same line as the baseboard does now. Any horror stories with electric heated floors?

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
i like nice words


Arachnamus posted:

I meant the equivalent of a bathroom but with the shower being the focus rather than the bath, i.e. shower, toilet, sink etc. The actual form the shower takes isn't that important but I wouldn't go for the complete water-everywhere style, the most I'd go in that direction would be a glass partition and change in tiling rather than a full shower tray.
I don't think a shower stall is nearly as much of a dealbreaker as a wet room. I think they're still called bathrooms even if they have a bath rather than a shower. My personal preference would be to redistribute space so you can have the usual shower/tub combo upstairs, next to the master but not en suite, and then if it makes life easier, you could just do a half-bath (toilet and sink) downstairs.

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

Look at that staircase! Riserless glass treads? I have a mild phobia of see-through floors and riserless stairs, so combining those makes me very uncomfortable. They're like a more terrifying version of these stairs at the Des Moines Art Center, which I had a very hard time with.



They look awesome though.

Hey Des Moines Art Center Stairs Freakout Buddy. Also that weird little balcony up at the top that looks down through the entire stairwell.

It's made worse when you're climbing them while holding the hand of a two year old, as if the child will suddenly get sucked into the undertow and squirt out through the stairs without any warning.


Baronjutter posted:

Riser less stairs are pretty much not allowed by the building code here and lots of fussy architects get pissed off that those pencil pushers are getting in the way of their amazing artistic vision and oh my god they are demanding railings too?????

Pffft, why even have stringers

Bad Munki fucked around with this message at 18:32 on May 14, 2017

stone cold
Feb 15, 2014



WrenP-Complete posted:

Oh man, trying to find example images for this thread has made me realize that I both love modern farmhouse style done well and HATE it done badly.

Caveat: I hate bare bulbs in all cases.

How do you feel about what Chip and Joanna Gaines do?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Anne Whateley posted:

I don't think a shower stall is nearly as much of a dealbreaker as a wet room. I think they're still called bathrooms even if they have a bath rather than a shower. My personal preference would be to redistribute space so you can have the usual shower/tub combo upstairs, next to the master but not en suite, and then if it makes life easier, you could just do a half-bath (toilet and sink) downstairs.

Part of the benefit of the full shebang downstairs (apart from convenience for guests) is forming what's colloquially called a "granny annex", i.e. a sort-of-self-contained bit on the ground floor for moving your mother into when she's too frail for the stairs, which is a decent selling point in my area since most homeowners are hitting their 50s. Also space is at more of a premium than money in this case.

If you mean shower/tub combo as in a room with both in that might work if I can find space, but a shower inside a bath is a dealbreaker for me because I hate using them.

Wet rooms seem to be a big trend in this country right now but it feels like it's through a sense of opulence rather than convenience in most cases, or they're thinking about a glassed-off area, not a full wet room. The proper ones are good for disabled people because there's no lip to get over and loads of room for wheelchairs and seated showering.

elise the great posted:

The problem with wet rooms is that I like wearing fluffy slipper socks and a bathrobe after I finish a shower, which means I have to UGH GET DRESSED and/or take off my socks to pee on the weekends when there's no reason to rush out the door after a scrub.

Yeah not a fan of wet bathroom floors under any circumstances.

bee
Dec 17, 2008
Fitness Goal: To bench press at least one teenage Defiant Sally.

Our ensuite is a wet room and I hate it. Sure, it looks nice and modern and I'm sure that the previous owners did it to make the house more saleable, but it's a nuisance. After a shower water goes everywhere, so I keep a squeegee in there so I can herd it into the drain and have the floor dry out more quickly. Otherwise I end up stepping in tiny puddles if I need to get up during the night to pee.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



stone cold posted:

How do you feel about what Chip and Joanna Gaines do?

I didn't know who they were, but I found this website:
http://www.countryliving.com/home-d...farmhouse-tour/
and I hate a lot of it. It looks full of antiques that would crumble when you touch them, be a hard space to exist in, it's really decorative rather than functional, not my kind of thing at all.

stone cold
Feb 15, 2014



WrenP-Complete posted:

I didn't know who they were, but I found this website:
http://www.countryliving.com/home-d...farmhouse-tour/
and I hate a lot of it. It looks full of antiques that would crumble when you touch them, be a hard space to exist in, it's really decorative rather than functional, not my kind of thing at all.

Yeah, for me, I don't necessarily enjoy the way they stage and the decor elements, but I like their designs.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.

Where did the "putting words on walls" thing come from (or, pictures with words and/or phrase on it)? Was it like this big high-art thing that got diluted down and cheapened, or did it appear independently in it's current state somewhere?

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


PRADA SLUT posted:

Where did the "putting words on walls" thing come from (or, pictures with words and/or phrase on it)? Was it like this big high-art thing that got diluted down and cheapened, or did it appear independently in it's current state somewhere?

I think it was driven by two factors, which really have the same root. "Lifestyle" social media stars propelled the trend, because photographing yourself in front of some BIG words OF varying SIZES is an easy way to fake a sense of significance. It's part of how middle-class interior design is increasingly looking to commercial spaces for inspiration. Hey, Chipotle puts words on their walls, why not us. Underneath both aspects of the trend is the problem of people having no artistic reference points besides advertising.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.

Is there any way to mount a Nelson Sconce to concrete? I've got a raw concrete wall behind a bed I want to mount some sconces to, in a non permanent way. The sconces normally mount with screws to the back, which is fine for drywall but not concrete. Ceiling is concrete as well, so no ceiling-mounted options.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Any glue strong enough would most likely leave marks on the wall. Why not just drill it? The holes would be small and easily patched but you'd probably never get that monolithic raw concrete look again, or maybe you could?

HelloIAmYourHeart
Dec 29, 2008

Send us signals in the glow
of night windows



Fallen Rib

Tomorrow I will make an album of my grandparents' house, because it was quite something, but for now here is a teaser: 100% toile bedroom. Toile wallpaper, lampshades, bedding, and upholstery.



My grandmother broke both her hips falling out of that drat bed (twice, one hip each time).

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


PRADA SLUT posted:

Is there any way to mount a Nelson Sconce to concrete? I've got a raw concrete wall behind a bed I want to mount some sconces to, in a non permanent way. The sconces normally mount with screws to the back, which is fine for drywall but not concrete. Ceiling is concrete as well, so no ceiling-mounted options.

You have killer taste - is the rest of your bedroom Herman Miller-y too? I like the idea of pairing something graceful like this with a raw concrete wall.

There are ways to screw into concrete, which will leave a mark but you can dye to match when you patch it. Depending on how heavy the lamps are you miiiight be able to do something with heavy-duty adhesive strips? But if a lamp falls off in the middle of the night you'd probably die of a heart attack.

HelloIAmYourHeart posted:

Tomorrow I will make an album of my grandparents' house, because it was quite something, but for now here is a teaser: 100% toile bedroom. Toile wallpaper, lampshades, bedding, and upholstery.



My grandmother broke both her hips falling out of that drat bed (twice, one hip each time).

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Part of my job is mounting things on walls, mostly signs, and we go about it two ways. For lighter objects we use 3M "very high bond" tape, which is expensive but is actually used in construction to literally tape entire window frames into skyscrapers and such. It's a foam backed tape so you'd get a couple mm of gap but the super thin stuff doesn't hold so well on concrete or any surface that isn't something like drywall. Even then I wouldn't want to use it for a nice fixture like that. It would probably hold, and it would probably pry off once you move out and clean off with some goo-gone. It's also pretty expensive and you can't just order a tiny bit, we tried some knock-off brands that were cheaper and claimed to be the same and we had signs falling off walls, so if you do go this route get the 3M VHB.

The best method though is properly drilling it into the wall. All you'd need is a concrete drill bit and some of those plastic plugs (make sure to get the ones designed for concrete, not drywall) and it will secure very nicely. Sometimes it's a pain drilling into concrete without a proper hammer-drill. If you have or can borrow one it makes drilling into concrete almost as easy as drilling into wood.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.

Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

You have killer taste - is the rest of your bedroom Herman Miller-y too? I like the idea of pairing something graceful like this with a raw concrete wall.

There are ways to screw into concrete, which will leave a mark but you can dye to match when you patch it. Depending on how heavy the lamps are you miiiight be able to do something with heavy-duty adhesive strips? But if a lamp falls off in the middle of the night you'd probably die of a heart attack.




Most of my place is Herman-Miller-esque. I have a number of pieces from Herman Miller, but I'm trying maintain as few pieces of furniture or decor as possible so it doesn't look like I just bought an entire Design Within Reach catalog. The living room has an Arco and an Eames, surrounding a Noguchi Geek Chic Envoy with one of those Herman Miller combo stool/side table things that look like a lathed spool. That's actually the entirety of the furniture in the entire room (save for an unspecified rug and painting); the idea is that because the pieces are fairly.. ubiquitous and thick, it keeps the room from looking overloaded or like I just bought every piece of ~*iconic*~ furniture I could get my hands on.

The bedroom is a Parallel Wide bed but due to the concrete wall and ceiling, there isn't really any light aside from the window. Topping the bed with a Pendleton quilt.

I'm in the middle of a move but I could take pictures of things in a few weeks. Some things (like the bed) aren't even up yet, but Herman Miller has their sale right now so I'm considering options.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


PRADA SLUT posted:

Most of my place is Herman-Miller-esque. I have a number of pieces from Herman Miller, but I'm trying maintain as few pieces of furniture or decor as possible so it doesn't look like I just bought an entire Design Within Reach catalog. The living room has an Arco and an Eames, surrounding a Noguchi Geek Chic Envoy with one of those Herman Miller combo stool/side table things that look like a lathed spool. That's actually the entirety of the furniture in the entire room (save for an unspecified rug and painting); the idea is that because the pieces are fairly.. ubiquitous and thick, it keeps the room from looking overloaded or like I just bought every piece of ~*iconic*~ furniture I could get my hands on.

The bedroom is a Parallel Wide bed but due to the concrete wall and ceiling, there isn't really any light aside from the window. Topping the bed with a Pendleton quilt.

I'm in the middle of a move but I could take pictures of things in a few weeks. Some things (like the bed) aren't even up yet, but Herman Miller has their sale right now so I'm considering options.

I would love to see pictures! I'm always lusting after a Pendleton quilt but Much Bigger Brontosaurus is always like "we live in a desert" "you kick off all the blankets every night anyway" "why don't you just cover the bed in Kinfolk magazines if you wanna be basic"

So we have a TJ Maxx special and I live unfulfilled

Computer viking
May 30, 2011
Now with less breakage.

I'll be the dissenter that likes all-wet bathrooms. Yes, you need a squeegee by the shower, but with shower drapes it's just a couple of small puddles. You can still keep your clothes or fluffy bathrobe in there, just keep it off the floor (which you probably want to do either way).

On the positive side it makes the useful shower area larger than most shower stalls, and it makes the floor completely flat so there's nothing to trip on with wet slippery feet. Practically speaking it makes it trivial to wash the floor, and easier to wash large objects in the shower. I also use the bathroom as a place to let dripping-wet jackets and the like hang and dry, since I live in a small apartment and the wooden floor in the hallway probably wouldn't appreciate it.

(No pictures, though. It's a minimum-effort 1998 "built as an investment by a rental company" apartment, and we've put a matching amount of care into decorating it.)

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.

Is there a resource of bad design and why it's bad? I'm not looking for "LUL design fail" blogs or whatever, but more like the ones that take an analytical approach to why something is good / bad. I often see photos of interior design that feel "off" to me, but I can't specifically say why.

It's like when you see a bad movie and you know something is wrong, but then you see an analysis from a film critic who points out where all the problems lie and the underlying bad decisions become clear.

Like this for example (10,000 sqft house): Something about this aesthetic is throwing me off but I don't know what. Something about it seems superficial or uninspired. The rock slabs? The excess (generic-looking) furniture? That it looks like it was just plucked out of a default design for something? The other house stuck right next to it? That weird-rear end diamond thing above the fireplace? All of the above?

Or is it perfectly fine but I just don't "get it" since I'm into downtown lofts and not the suburbs?

PRADA SLUT fucked around with this message at 16:44 on May 15, 2017

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Penpal
Apr 6, 2009


All of that furniture looks like it was bought at costco or something and everything's kind of the same colour so nothing's really popping out. They might have a decent lighting situation when it's evening wine times but it's overall seems prepped for utility. Reminds me my relatives decks.

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