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Monagle
May 7, 2007
Wonka Wash spelled backwards.

Magic Hate Ball posted:

I remember reading a suggestion that it was a Buddhist hand symbol meaning "fear not", which makes a gigantic wad of sense unless it's entirely false.

I always thought it was supposed to be the kind of hand gesture that you would see for example a woman on the price is right displaying a prize. Its a kind of "presenting" gesture, which makes sense given that shes saying meanwhile then presenting whats happening in the meantime.

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Solice Kirsk
Jun 1, 2004



So has the thread determined what was going on with Audrey? Was I correct that she's in a mental institute?

HD DAD
Jan 13, 2010

Generic white guy.

Maybe in an institution within the context of the show. But I always thought it was sort of a meta-commentary on whatís going on with the story as a whole. Realities as dreams, waking into other realities and dreams...or something along those lines.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



S2E8: another one that focuses on the more grounded storylines... except I actually quite liked the writing in this one. It seems overall tighter than usual, and there are some standout lines ("As your attorney, your friend, and your brother... I advise you to get a better lawyer" and Cooper's quip about driver education). It does soap opera parody more than straight soap opera, unlike many other episodes. Maybe not David Lynch's vision of Twin Peaks, but a good vision nonetheless.

Except for the storyline about Norma's family, that one's a non-starter. Who's the showrunner that loved Hank so much they involved him in everything? At times he feels like he was written as a substitute for Leo except Leo's still in this show. Might as well just not have him get shot if you needed a shady rear end in a top hat around.

Wait, Hank was the one who shot Leo. Is this the shady rear end in a top hat version of Highlander?

The Walrus
Jul 9, 2002



Solice Kirsk posted:

So has the thread determined what was going on with Audrey? Was I correct that she's in a mental institute?

if it's canon the secret dossier basically confirms this.

And More
Jun 19, 2013

How far, Doctor?
How long have you lived?


Monagle posted:

I always thought it was supposed to be the kind of hand gesture that you would see for example a woman on the price is right displaying a prize. Its a kind of "presenting" gesture, which makes sense given that shes saying meanwhile then presenting whats happening in the meantime.

I still think it's an upside down time out gesture signalling Cooper that he's gonna have to chill in the red room for 25 years.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



S2E9: Cooper brings everybody together at the roadhouse, and I have to confess, I'm not so sure exactly why except it makes for a traditional scene setup. He doesn't do anything he couldn't have done on his own, leaves almost immediately after everyone arrives, and the actual climax happens somewhere else entirely. It's a weird and kind of patchy scene.

Ray Wise is loving killing it.

Dick Tremayne asks Andy "got a light" and I nearly jumped from the couch.

The way I hear it, it's all downhill from here.

CelticPredator
Oct 11, 2013

I bet you would really enjoy One Punch Man.


Escobarbarian posted:

I donít think itís bad - I like it overall - but I will forever be baffled by the amount of people who completely love it.

Itís one of the most powerful films Iíve ever seen. Itís hard to explain but Lauraís death just gets at me in the most haunting and horrific way that no film ever has. I remember not liking it much after I watched it, but there was this sense of...dread and sadness that stuck with me long after.

Even like Bob by the dresser where itís not done in a typical horror movie fashion (like Bob pops out or something) still freaks the gently caress out of me. Itís so creepy and off putting that this man is just there, in broad daylight and you canít get away from him.

Ahhh.

Movie is so drat good.

Flyinglemur
Jul 2, 2004

Oh Lucy, I do apologize, I been so terribly busy. Honestly, I barely have the time to drink deep and descend.


My Lovely Horse posted:

Dick Tremayne asks Andy "got a light" and I nearly jumped from the couch.

Ya don't say

regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006

More pretentious than thou


My Lovely Horse posted:


The way I hear it, it's all downhill from here.

It's not *all* downhill. You have the last two episodes to look forward to. And just keep in the back of your mind that everyone thought that was how the series ended, and then we heard there was a movie, and then the movie didn't really address the questions we had (which is a big part of why the movie wasn't well regarded initially).

I didn't watch it when it aired but I did watch it on vhs a couple years later and after the series finale I was completely dumbstruck. I couldn't believe a series could or would end that way. It was about 70% outrage, 20% incredulous, and 10% amusement.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


It's funny that everyone dumps on Super Nadine, but I love that subplot, it's grotesque and kind of funny in all the right ways and I wish the other subplots (civil war, James) were as efficiently bent.

A True Jar Jar Fan
Nov 3, 2003

Diamond


Nadine rules and I agree that she should have shoveled the Bob Orb.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


The Simple Minds picture on our office shredder was getting beat up so:



I wish I knew where the laminator sheets were so I could just remake the whole thing. He's...wrapped in plastic...?

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



E10&11: we're starting to get some lodge mythology in here, James and Nadine do whatever they do, and Ben Horne invents Feng Shui. Apart from the lodge stuff, it's all starting to feel like characters are being put in a holding pattern until someone figures out what to do with them.

Nadine at the cheerleader tryouts has some super dodgy editing but after really enjoying the CGI and off-screen car explosion in S3 I'm not gonna complain too much about that.

that ivy guy
May 20, 2015



https://roamaboutmike.com/2013/02/1...amera-an-atomic

Just when I thought atomic bombs couldn't get any more interesting...

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!


CelticPredator posted:

Itís one of the most powerful films Iíve ever seen. Itís hard to explain but Lauraís death just gets at me in the most haunting and horrific way that no film ever has. I remember not liking it much after I watched it, but there was this sense of...dread and sadness that stuck with me long after.

Even like Bob by the dresser where itís not done in a typical horror movie fashion (like Bob pops out or something) still freaks the gently caress out of me. Itís so creepy and off putting that this man is just there, in broad daylight and you canít get away from him.

Ahhh.

Movie is so drat good.

It's Lee's performance. I've seen other movies that have similar elements of tragic inevitability, but Lee is just so intense yet so real and you already know so much from the show about all of the horrible things she carries on her shoulders. The conflict between her public life, where she's literally the most popular person in town, and her private life where she's isolated to the point of basically giving up and allowing herself to be killed, is I think not an easy thing for an actress to portray and Lee knocks it out of the park in scene after scene.

The final scene with her and Cooper is one of the more soul crushing things I've seen in film. She's feeling relief, because she's no longer suffering, but the viewer and Cooper know everything she had to go through for that relief. And there's a unmistakable sadness in her face even as she laughs, it's a very complex performance.

HD DAD
Jan 13, 2010

Generic white guy.

And itís mind boggling that she was originally just gonna be a body - Lynch had no idea she could act at first.

The Merkinman
Apr 22, 2007

I sell only quality merkins. What is a merkin you ask? Why, it's a wig for your genitals!

No one saw the Twin Peaks Valentine's Day Card contest?

And More
Jun 19, 2013

How far, Doctor?
How long have you lived?



Some of these are yrev very good.


My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



E12: this is news to no one who knows the first thing about Twin Peaks, but the Laura murder mystery was what tied all those characters together, and the whole thing falls apart without it. Basically just watching for lodge bits now.

oneforthevine
Sep 25, 2015




My Lovely Horse posted:

E12: this is news to no one who knows the first thing about Twin Peaks, but the Laura murder mystery was what tied all those characters together, and the whole thing falls apart without it. Basically just watching for lodge bits now.

This is one of the reasons Season 3 works - because even after her murder's been solved for 25 years, Laura still hangs over that town like a thick fog.

Solice Kirsk
Jun 1, 2004



Ha, I forgot I made this:

romanowski
Nov 10, 2012


I wish dale cooper was my dad

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



There is still some interesting stuff in season 2. We see Cooper employ his intuition techniques again (picking a house to look at by coin toss) and it got me thinking about how as Dougie in S3 he relies purely on intuition. He doesn't interpret the results of his actions nor does he voluntarily trigger random events like when he sets up the rock throwing range or tosses a coin, he just does things and they work out. And in S3 that's all portrayed as the intervention of lodge spirits/probably MIKE. I think there's a point to be made that these scenes in S3 retroactively characterize Cooper's intuition techniques in S1 and 2 as similar interventions of otherworldly forces, especially considering how this knowledge was relayed to him "in a dream."

kaworu
Jul 23, 2004



You know, I've been watching Mindhunter, and in truth it does deal with some subject matter somewhat similar to Twin Peaks in a strictly Big Picture sense - both shows are concerned with the same greater philosophical question - "Why is there such evil in the world? Why do the truly evil men commit the acts which they commit?"

But one show goes about it in an entirely dreamlike and intuitive sense of heightened reality. Because I was also trying to figure out what the difference was between the mundane scenes - the parts that deal with everyday life. Mindhunter handles it in a more 'normal' and 'traditional' sense. We get shots of the characters looking tortured. Their feelings and motivations are clearly telegraphed and clearly layered through the subtext - we know exactly what the filmmakers mean when they linger on a particular shot, or zoom in on a particular character at a particular moment, or whatever.

I was realizing that why I always felt on the edge of my seat for every season 3 episode - even when it was just a guy bitching about sweeping the floor or Audrey and her "husband" having frustratingly circular arguments about whether to go out or not - there is always that sense of heightened reality, as well as the feeling that there is just something truly "off" in that scenes that otherwise feel normal.

I actually liken it to Time Signature in songwriting, for example. It's like the vast majority of film has been written using the equivalent of... more simple or "tried and true" formulas (or in this metaphor time signatures) even though there are dozens upon dozens of esoteric places to go, films tended to be largely mainstream simply by nature of what they were. In fact, Kenneth Anger's films (Which is more or less directly referenced more than once in Season 3) were the first to really sort of... create films with truly unconventional "time signatures", where things felt off-kilter and vaguely disturbing or upsetting or somehow "wrong" in a way you could not quite place your finger on.

The world of Twin Peaks and the works of David Lynch in general have that feeling of uncomfortable "wrongness" of course, and it's rather at the essence of what he does with The Grandmother sort of laying that out even before Eraserhead.

I keep thinking back to the image of "The Real Diane" - strikingly red hair, heavily made up face - was directly echoing the concept of "The Scarlet Woman", which we probably have all read about it. But what I never fully grasped was that Marjorie Cameron, who played this role of 'The Scarlet Woman' in the Kenneth Anger 1954 film Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome, was also the REAL 'Scarlet Woman' to Aleister Crowley (and the one-time wife of Jack Parsons) and as such she was a sort of... religious icon to all of his followers.

What's interesting is that Crowley religion called Thelema which was... Pagan and almost pseudo-satanist and certainly very ritualistic, it's all rooted in sort of the seedy underbelly of Post-war Hollywood in the late 40s, which was also the time and place where Anger grew up and made his first films and where Crowley and Parsons and Cameron and all these characters were. The whole "sad/scary/weird/darkly humorous Hollywood underbelly vibe of it all reminds me also strongly of Lynch's favorite film, Billy Wilder's 'Sunset Boulevard' which should be required viewing for all the main contributors to this thread if they haven't seen it half a dozen times already!

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


kaworu posted:

What's interesting is that Crowley religion called Thelema which was... Pagan and almost pseudo-satanist and certainly very ritualistic, it's all rooted in sort of the seedy underbelly of Post-war Hollywood in the late 40s, which was also the time and place where Anger grew up and made his first films and where Crowley and Parsons and Cameron and all these characters were. The whole "sad/scary/weird/darkly humorous Hollywood underbelly vibe of it all reminds me also strongly of Lynch's favorite film, Billy Wilder's 'Sunset Boulevard' which should be required viewing for all the main contributors to this thread if they haven't seen it half a dozen times already!

I have not seen it. Maybe this is the final impetus I need to sit down and watch it. Thank you for your insightful posts, as always!

Escobarbarian
Jun 18, 2004

"Why is it blue?"
"It's always blue."


Sunset Blvd is good as hell

Dirt Road Junglist
Oct 8, 2010

I made it to the rage phase



kaworu posted:

I keep thinking back to the image of "The Real Diane" - strikingly red hair, heavily made up face - was directly echoing the concept of "The Scarlet Woman", which we probably have all read about it. But what I never fully grasped was that Marjorie Cameron, who played this role of 'The Scarlet Woman' in the Kenneth Anger 1954 film Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome, was also the REAL 'Scarlet Woman' to Aleister Crowley (and the one-time wife of Jack Parsons) and as such she was a sort of... religious icon to all of his followers.

What's interesting is that Crowley religion called Thelema which was... Pagan and almost pseudo-satanist and certainly very ritualistic, it's all rooted in sort of the seedy underbelly of Post-war Hollywood in the late 40s, which was also the time and place where Anger grew up and made his first films and where Crowley and Parsons and Cameron and all these characters were. The whole "sad/scary/weird/darkly humorous Hollywood underbelly vibe of it all reminds me also strongly of Lynch's favorite film, Billy Wilder's 'Sunset Boulevard' which should be required viewing for all the main contributors to this thread if they haven't seen it half a dozen times already!

The Scarlet Woman of Aleister Crowley and Thelema are deeply tied to sex magick as well.

Like a certain scene in a certain last episode.

And More
Jun 19, 2013

How far, Doctor?
How long have you lived?


Dirt Road Junglist posted:

The Scarlet Woman of Aleister Crowley and Thelema are deeply tied to sex magick as well.

Like a certain scene in a certain last episode.

I saw both first put into context in that article kaworu was referencing. Kenneth Anger's music video flicks definitely seem interesting, and the Magick Lantern Cycle is available on blu-ray in Britain, too. It's Kind of a shame that you can't purchase the Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome with its ELO soundtrack.


Escobarbarian posted:

Sunset Blvd is good as hell

Yeah, Lynch's got impeccable taste.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



I still remember watching the combined first and second episode of S3 and realizing that after everything he'd put in it already, the man had decided to top it off with Chromatics at the end. This is my show, it was made for me.

And More
Jun 19, 2013

How far, Doctor?
How long have you lived?


My Lovely Horse posted:

I still remember watching the combined first and second episode of S3 and realizing that after everything he'd put in it already, the man had decided to top it off with Chromatics at the end. This is my show, it was made for me.

Shadow is genuinely a really good match for Twin Peaks. I know it's been pointed out that basically all Chromatics songs are somewhat similar to it, but stillÖ If you told me that Lynch himself wrote the lyrics:
"For the last time",
"At night I'm driving in your car pretending that we'll leave this town",
"And now you're just a stranger's dream",
"I took your picture from the frame",

and

"Can you hear me?"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4NWOyPp1yg#t=72s

I'd totally buy it.

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My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



I've lost track of what exact episode I'm on but all these storylines are really boring and dumb. Sometimes I think General Ben Horne is the dumbest, sometimes I think the mayor's brother's widow is the dumbest, surprisingly they're both very clearly worse than James', and we mercifully don't see too much of Nadine after she beats Hank into a pulp and presumably out of the show.

Maybe it felt different in the early 90s, but Jean Renault seemed like an ineffective villain. Or a warmup act that had to stall because the main act was late, then got yanked off stage with one of those vaudeville hooks once the star arrived, who in this case is, of course, Windom Earle. Kind of a waste of a perfectly good Michael Parks.

e: yeah I'm at the one where Leo meets Earle at the end, whichever number that is.

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