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CBJSprague24
Dec 5, 2010

Again, Torts took him to a very high mountain and showed him Nationwide and all its splendor.

"All this I will give you," he said, "if you will lay down and block for me." -Jackets 15:16




https://epicflightacademy.com/airline-direct-program/?fbclid=IwAR2hOtkdXMtcW2FObNZL5ugBOmFzWmrwI5wgoZpbGuuFTQVCaVfD4FrSDL8

Who the gently caress wants to be committed to flying a Caravan from 350-1,850TT?

Arson Daily posted:

Anybody ever leave a job and wish they really hadn't? I really like working for my airline and it's genuinely a good place to work, but it isn't fun. My old ACMI job was way more interesting and the crews just better to be around most of the time. Given another chance I probably wouldn't have left, especially since I would have been a 767 captain and looking forward to upgrading on the 74. Not that that really matters but still. Just sad that I'll probably never go back to a bunch of the places I used to regularly go almost monthly.

After about a year of frustration (during which I was offered a gig as a Flight School Manager and thank gently caress I passed (which I posted about itt in July '19)), I had reached the gently caress it point with my current aviation job just before COVID and had been flirting with two regionals for openings, had the makings of a solid lead at a company that deals in the safety of flight, and had even considered going back full-time to my family business. Then the 'Rona happened and all the aviation alternatives imploded, so I stayed put.

As it turned out, things improved dramatically. I'm working from home (and, if boss man wants me to stick around once this is over, that'll continue). Karen, the office pet who was sent to California for what turned out to be a partially-employer-paid trip to Galaxy's Edge, ragequit and was replaced by someone infinitely easier to work with, and some of the minor slights in my job have been corrected.

TL;DR- things sometimes work out in weird ways. Things at Citrus Killer may get better even though they're not great now.

CBJSprague24 fucked around with this message at 17:56 on Mar 17, 2021

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ausgezeichnet
Sep 18, 2005

In my country this is definitely not offensive!

Nap Ghost

Animal posted:

I have a friend who is a CA at SW, doesnít have kids, and is always posting pictures of his brand new Lamborghini.

I make enough money now that itís hard to gather the motivation to do everything required to move on. I donít have a degree so the choices as limited. Liking my job is not making it any easier.

You guys are one contract away from having one of the best jobs in aviation. Yeah, I know you've been negotiating since the last millenium.

I left AirTran in 2007 and would be a junior captain at SWA if I had stayed. I regret nothing. The years after I left would have been nearly unbearable with all the tribal bullshit dealt by the anti-Tranny, RSW jerkoffs. And loving kernals.

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


Animal posted:

I have a friend who is a CA at SW, doesnít have kids, and is always posting pictures of his brand new Lamborghini.

I make enough money now that itís hard to gather the motivation to do everything required to move on. I donít have a degree so the choices as limited. Liking my job is not making it any easier.

Thatís pretty much where Iím at, which sucks because itís entirely the wrong attitude to have in a long drawn out bloody contract negotiation. Sure I could make more money elsewhere, but then I might end up hating my job, and I donít know if thatís worth it, especially since this is my second career. And I think the company knows thatís the case for a lot of us here.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



KodiakRS posted:

This is the closest you're going to get.



I would rehost this, but itís too long for Imgur so apologies for the Reddit link.

CBJamo
Jul 15, 2012



New spintires map looking good.

DuckConference
May 27, 2004



Decided to catch up on the thread over the past couple of weeks, lol at this post from 2019:

Pryor on Fire posted:

This is a pretty good untangling of the whole MCAS thing

https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/2/18518176/boeing-737-max-crash-problems-human-error-mcas-faa


Boeing is completely hosed. Massive reform is coming for the FAA.


Anyway I'm thinking of getting back into the air. I did a few hours of flying lessons as a teenager and then never went back to it, but a few weeks ago I realized that I actually have enough time and money to actually do a PPL now if I want to. I'm thinking of going in for a discovery flight once I'm fully vaccinated and see if it's something I want to go through with. If Sagebrush or someone else has opinions on bay area flight schools I'd be interested to hear them.

I also found out about paramotoring and it looks pretty awesome but I'm having a hard time understanding the level of risk it presents. As in even if you make good decisions it can turn out that -whoops- there was some wind shear that wasn't in the forecast and now your wing is just a piece of cloth flapping in the breeze and you dead. It seems to draw in a lot of BASE jump type people and that kind of gives me pause.

Prefect Six
Mar 27, 2009



Just catching up on the thread, but added my IR in November.

Sagebrush
Feb 26, 2012


"Why does that Subaru break down every time you look at it, Travis", Punchy said. I nearly fell out of the jump seat in my Brat, aghast. "That thing a princess?" I coughed and gulped. "Hahahaha, nice one, Punchy", I said

DuckConference posted:

Anyway I'm thinking of getting back into the air. I did a few hours of flying lessons as a teenager and then never went back to it, but a few weeks ago I realized that I actually have enough time and money to actually do a PPL now if I want to. I'm thinking of going in for a discovery flight once I'm fully vaccinated and see if it's something I want to go through with. If Sagebrush or someone else has opinions on bay area flight schools I'd be interested to hear them.

I also found out about paramotoring and it looks pretty awesome but I'm having a hard time understanding the level of risk it presents. As in even if you make good decisions it can turn out that -whoops- there was some wind shear that wasn't in the forecast and now your wing is just a piece of cloth flapping in the breeze and you dead. It seems to draw in a lot of BASE jump type people and that kind of gives me pause.

I sent you a PM re. local flight schools.

Paramotoring also looks like a blast and apparently you can get certified in a long weekend down in San Luis Obispo for like 3k so I kinda wanna do that when covid is over.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

ASK ME WHY THE HYUNDAI KONA IS THE GREATEST CAR ON GOD'S EARTH, I HAVE STRONG OPINIONS ON THIS SUBJECT


DuckConference posted:

Decided to catch up on the thread over the past couple of weeks, lol at this post from 2019:



Anyway I'm thinking of getting back into the air. I did a few hours of flying lessons as a teenager and then never went back to it, but a few weeks ago I realized that I actually have enough time and money to actually do a PPL now if I want to. I'm thinking of going in for a discovery flight once I'm fully vaccinated and see if it's something I want to go through with. If Sagebrush or someone else has opinions on bay area flight schools I'd be interested to hear them.

I also found out about paramotoring and it looks pretty awesome but I'm having a hard time understanding the level of risk it presents. As in even if you make good decisions it can turn out that -whoops- there was some wind shear that wasn't in the forecast and now your wing is just a piece of cloth flapping in the breeze and you dead. It seems to draw in a lot of BASE jump type people and that kind of gives me pause.

Paramotors are pretty cool, I don't know a lot about them but my friend flies them and loves it.

With regards to getting a PPL, I will say this: I've talked to zero people who have any regret about completing any level of flight training that isn't based in "wow that was very expensive." My Dad started it when I was learning to fly, just to sort of share the experience, he quit a few weeks in and said "hey, it's not for me, but I'm glad I tried." That's the worst case scenario for you, unless you are taking out loans to afford the training and banking on it as a career, so if you take a discovery flight and it seems like something you might like to pursue, give it a go. The worst case scenario is you spend some money and end up with a story to tell over drinks about how you learned to fly a a plane once.

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


DuckConference posted:

I also found out about paramotoring and it looks pretty awesome but I'm having a hard time understanding the level of risk it presents. As in even if you make good decisions it can turn out that -whoops- there was some wind shear that wasn't in the forecast and now your wing is just a piece of cloth flapping in the breeze and you dead. It seems to draw in a lot of BASE jump type people and that kind of gives me pause.
I did a lot of research on paramotors last year considering getting in to them and from what I found wing collapses aren't really a huge concern unless you're looking to do acrobatic stuff. There are a variety of wings that offer different levels of speed performance stability, with the faster and more maneuverable wings also being more likely to collapse. The ones intended for beginner use I've seen videos of professionals intentionally attempting to induce collapses and having a hard time doing it, plus even if they manage to make it happen it tends to self-recover.

Here's one example of intentionally trying to disrupt a stable wing:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20i6UGDvwEI#t=141s

And here's another of a wind-caused partial collapse:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VWLdKRF6Ek#t=178s

If you're not pushing the limits it doesn't seem to be too big of a deal.

The performance wings though will definitely give you all the rope in the world with which to hang yourself, especially if using a "speed bar" to reduce drag.

Here's one of those completely collapsing more or less on its own when being used for high speed but still supposedly within spec flight:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQpmkSrDJaU#t=134s
Earlier in the video that same wing had a partial collapse with the video host flying.

This also demonstrates the backup plan that's recommended for all paramotors, a parachute. As with all aircraft the old saying about altitude, airspeed, and ideas applies. There's always a point where you're close enough to the hard stuff that anything going wrong is going to hurt no matter what.

wolrah fucked around with this message at 16:13 on Mar 25, 2021

DuckConference
May 27, 2004



wolrah posted:

I did a lot of research on paramotors last year considering getting in to them and from what I found wing collapses aren't really a huge concern unless you're looking to do acrobatic stuff. There are a variety of wings that offer different levels of speed performance stability, with the faster and more maneuverable wings also being more likely to collapse. The ones intended for beginner use I've seen videos of professionals intentionally attempting to induce collapses and having a hard time doing it, plus even if they manage to make it happen it tends to self-recover.

Here's one example of intentionally trying to disrupt a stable wing:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20i6UGDvwEI#t=141s

And here's another of a wind-caused partial collapse:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VWLdKRF6Ek#t=178s

If you're not pushing the limits it doesn't seem to be too big of a deal.

The performance wings though will definitely give you all the rope in the world with which to hang yourself, especially if using a "speed bar" to reduce drag.

Here's one of those completely collapsing more or less on its own when being used for high speed but still supposedly within spec flight:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQpmkSrDJaU#t=134s
Earlier in the video that same wing had a partial collapse with the video host flying.

This also demonstrates the backup plan that's recommended for all paramotors, a parachute. As with all aircraft the old saying about altitude, airspeed, and ideas applies. There's always a point where you're close enough to the hard stuff that anything going wrong is going to hurt no matter what.

Yeah those are good points. Watching some of the crash videos he has on his channel, they mostly seem to involve low-altitude aerobatics and taking off straight into an obstruction, and don't seem to involve someone doing reasonable flying but falling out of the sky for no reason.

greasyhands
Oct 28, 2006

Best quality posts,
freshly delivered


I dont know a lot about paramotors either, but they sell a like hip mounted rocket propelled emergency chute that will fully deploy in like 150ft or something crazy

dexter6
Sep 22, 2003


Which one of you is this? https://youtu.be/nQaYKOquFyI

Lord Stimperor
Jun 13, 2018

I'm a lovable meme.



greasyhands posted:

I dont know a lot about paramotors either, but they sell a like hip mounted rocket propelled emergency chute that will fully deploy in like 150ft or something crazy

What where

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


DuckConference posted:

Yeah those are good points. Watching some of the crash videos he has on his channel, they mostly seem to involve low-altitude aerobatics and taking off straight into an obstruction, and don't seem to involve someone doing reasonable flying but falling out of the sky for no reason.
Yeah, that's the conclusion I've come to as well. People who aren't doing risky things tend to not have major problems. Like any aircraft there are a couple of ways you can get totally hosed by the atmosphere with no reasonable way to avoid it or recover, usually involving weird wind at low altitude, but more likely than not if you trace back a bad crash you find multiple risky or just plain bad decisions having been made to get there.

I'm figuring this year will probably still be a write off as far as doing things involving other people, but I will probably be booking training for 2022. It looks like just the kind of thing I need in my life to counteract days spent in front of screens.

KodiakRS
Jul 11, 2012



One of the things to keep in mind is that as a new pilot you don't always know how much risk you're taking, or how much is acceptable. There have been plenty of accidents where someone did something they thought was safe and then got surprised when things went bad simply because they didn't realize how dangerous what they were doing was. Taking lessons, learning from other pilots, and establishing good routines/limits help mitigate risk but at the end of the day there's no true replacement for experience.

Lord Stimperor
Jun 13, 2018

I'm a lovable meme.



Guessing that the opposite is also true - people not realizing that an unusual situation is, in fact, in itself not dangerous. The subsequent overcorrection then creating the dangerous situation. Gonna mention this to my instructor so he lets me spin things wheeeeh

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


KodiakRS posted:

One of the things to keep in mind is that as a new pilot you don't always know how much risk you're taking, or how much is acceptable. There have been plenty of accidents where someone did something they thought was safe and then got surprised when things went bad simply because they didn't realize how dangerous what they were doing was. Taking lessons, learning from other pilots, and establishing good routines/limits help mitigate risk but at the end of the day there's no true replacement for experience.
Something I've been very happy to see in all my research is that the community seems to be very strong on the point that while you legally can fly a paramotor without any kind of training it's a loving stupid idea to do so.

KodiakRS
Jul 11, 2012



Just got the word that I'll be returning to active flying status in May. Out of the 7 available bid options, 5 would require a transcon commute. Come on seniority, don't fail me now.

Lord Stimperor posted:

Guessing that the opposite is also true - people not realizing that an unusual situation is, in fact, in itself not dangerous. The subsequent overcorrection then creating the dangerous situation. Gonna mention this to my instructor so he lets me spin things wheeeeh

You mean like crashing an airliner into a swamp killing over 100 people all because a lightbulb in the cockpit burned out?

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

ASK ME WHY THE HYUNDAI KONA IS THE GREATEST CAR ON GOD'S EARTH, I HAVE STRONG OPINIONS ON THIS SUBJECT


wolrah posted:

Something I've been very happy to see in all my research is that the community seems to be very strong on the point that while you legally can fly a paramotor without any kind of training it's a loving stupid idea to do so.

Good god, really?

Canada has a separate permit. It's not onerous but at least it's something.

Pryor on Fire
May 14, 2013


https://twitter.com/scottiebateman/status/1376136145566765065

once local governments figure out this is possible about half the airports in the USA are going to require commercial airliners to take off like this

Cojawfee
May 31, 2006
I think the US is dumb for not using Celsius

What is so special about it?

Sagebrush
Feb 26, 2012


"Why does that Subaru break down every time you look at it, Travis", Punchy said. I nearly fell out of the jump seat in my Brat, aghast. "That thing a princess?" I coughed and gulped. "Hahahaha, nice one, Punchy", I said

They are using very low power and climbing slowly, which is usually undesirable because low and slow and fighting for altitude is a bad place to be in a plane. Normally a plane like that would be climbing at 2000-ish fpm just after takeoff. The A350 is 55 feet tall at the top of its vertical stabilizer, and in that video it appears to reach about 3-4 tails of altitude over 30 seconds. At best that's 400 feet per minute, which is like "Cessna 150 in summer in Flagstaff" climb rate.

But it sure is quieter, wouldn't want those people who live near the airport to hear airplanes

NightGyr
Mar 7, 2005
I � Unicode

How is it for fuel efficiency? If it saves gas, I'm sure the airlines will demand it.

The Ferret King
Nov 23, 2003

cluck cluck

I figure it'd be better to get them higher up before they left the airport perimeter.

MrYenko
Jun 17, 2012

#2 isn't ALWAYS bad...


Instead of noise, you can reach up and touch the departures as they fly over.

Cojawfee
May 31, 2006
I think the US is dumb for not using Celsius

Every take off is like a Group B rally. You can hear the hands of plane nerds slapping against the fuselage as you take off.

Two Kings
Oct 31, 2004

Get the scientists working on the tube technology, immediately.

Weíll see.

Iím still waiting for formation flying over the Atlantic to cut down on drag.

Arson Daily
Aug 11, 2003


Everybody does this. Every airline is doing some kind of de-rate or flex takeoff for many if not most departures. It's quieter and saves an assload of wear and tear on the engines. There are times when you won't, like if there is wind shear or other inclement weather but most of the time the airliner you're sitting in is doing a de-rated takeoff similar to that

Arson Daily
Aug 11, 2003


Double post!



Out of order?! Even in the future nothing works!

CBJSprague24
Dec 5, 2010

Again, Torts took him to a very high mountain and showed him Nationwide and all its splendor.

"All this I will give you," he said, "if you will lay down and block for me." -Jackets 15:16




Pryor on Fire posted:

https://twitter.com/scottiebateman/status/1376136145566765065

once local governments figure out this is possible about half the airports in the USA are going to require commercial airliners to take off like this

If I'd have seen that live, I would have hopped in my car just in case it were, in fact, stalling and prone to backing into the ground and exploding.

azflyboy
Nov 9, 2005


Arson Daily posted:

Everybody does this. Every airline is doing some kind of de-rate or flex takeoff for many if not most departures. It's quieter and saves an assload of wear and tear on the engines. There are times when you won't, like if there is wind shear or other inclement weather but most of the time the airliner you're sitting in is doing a de-rated takeoff similar to that

We have a button for doing reduced torque takeoffs on the Q400, but since the engines are so heavily de-rated anyway (they're rated for 4500hp, on an engine that's capable of producing 7000hp), the reduced torque has almost zero impact on fuel use or engine wear, so we quit using it a few years ago.

Likewise, we used to have a procedure where just after takeoff, the pilot monitoring would bring the condition levers from 1020rpm (the takeoff setting) back to 850rpm (the cruise setting), and then hit a button that kept the props at 850, but bumped the engine torque back up to the climb power setting.

Theoretically this saved fuel, and it did make the cabin quieter, but because of how the FADEC is set up, if the PM accidentally brought the condition levers aft of the 850 RPM detent, the FADEC assumed you were going to feather the engines, and essentially disabled the propeller governors, which meant a return to field.

After something like 15 years of that procedure, someone finally decided to actually look at the underlying numbers, and realized it actually saved zero fuel and cost a fair amount of money when people accidentally missed the detent, so it too was abandoned.

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


PT6A posted:

Good god, really?

Canada has a separate permit. It's not onerous but at least it's something.

In the US our definition of "ultralight" is a lot more restrictive than the rest of the world, apparently. The majority of the range you guys call ultralight is what we'd call "light sport aircraft" which does have a separate permit that's easier to get than a normal pilot's license but still requires some level of testing.

The entirely category is defined as such in part 103 of the Federal Aviation Regulations:

quote:

For the purposes of this part, an ultralight vehicle is a vehicle that:

(a) Is used or intended to be used for manned operation in the air by a single occupant;
(b) Is used or intended to be used for recreation or sport purposes only;
(c) Does not have any U.S. or foreign airworthiness certificate; and
(d) If unpowered, weighs less than 155 pounds; or
(e) If powered:
--(1) Weighs less than 254 pounds empty weight, excluding floats and safety devices which are intended for deployment in a potentially catastrophic situation;
--(2) Has a fuel capacity not exceeding 5 U.S. gallons;
--(3) Is not capable of more than 55 knots calibrated airspeed at full power in level flight; and
--(4) Has a power-off stall speed which does not exceed 24 knots calibrated airspeed.

Anything fitting those requirements does not require any kind of license, but there are fairly strict limitations on how they're allowed to be used. Most notably, they can only be flown during the day and sometimes twilight, not over populated areas, and have very little access to the various limited airspace classes around towered airports.

greasyhands
Oct 28, 2006

Best quality posts,
freshly delivered


Pretty sure they are just testing things and no one intends to take off an airliner like that...

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

ASK ME WHY THE HYUNDAI KONA IS THE GREATEST CAR ON GOD'S EARTH, I HAVE STRONG OPINIONS ON THIS SUBJECT


wolrah posted:

In the US our definition of "ultralight" is a lot more restrictive than the rest of the world, apparently. The majority of the range you guys call ultralight is what we'd call "light sport aircraft" which does have a separate permit that's easier to get than a normal pilot's license but still requires some level of testing.

The entirely category is defined as such in part 103 of the Federal Aviation Regulations:


Anything fitting those requirements does not require any kind of license, but there are fairly strict limitations on how they're allowed to be used. Most notably, they can only be flown during the day and sometimes twilight, not over populated areas, and have very little access to the various limited airspace classes around towered airports.

We have ultralights in Canada too, and the requirements to get a license (or indeed to instruct in them) are laughably low, but at least it's something.

Here are the requirements for an ultralight permit in Canada (CARS 421.21)

- 20 hours ground school and a written exam
- 10 hours total flight time (minimum 5 hours dual and 2 hours solo)
- 30 takeoffs and landings total, 10 of which must be solo
- The instructor submits a note saying you're competent

For powered parachutes, this is reduced to 5 hours flight time with the 5 hours dual "deemed to have been met."

It seems like the ultralight category in the US is both very restrictive and ridiculously lax at the same time. There's quite a bit that you simply cannot do, but you don't require any training at all. That seems quite silly to me.

Mao Zedong Thot
Oct 16, 2008



Mao Zedong Thot posted:

high performance 172

So yeah, I think I'm going to actually buy into this plane (a 1977 172xp). My flight school owned it until about 9 months ago when they sold it to a student, and now he's looking for a partner. Pretty loving excited -- it's not perfectly my dream plane (a 180) but it's pretty close, and cheap to boot. Definitely satisfies my mission for the next couple years: local VFR loving around, mild backcountry, finish instrument rating and occasional regional trips. Unfortunately it needs a new engine at the moment, so no chance of fly-before-I-buy. All of my instructors vouch for the plane and the partner though.

Animal
Apr 8, 2003


Mao Zedong Thot posted:

So yeah, I think I'm going to actually buy into this plane (a 1977 172xp). My flight school owned it until about 9 months ago when they sold it to a student, and now he's looking for a partner. Pretty loving excited -- it's not perfectly my dream plane (a 180) but it's pretty close, and cheap to boot. Definitely satisfies my mission for the next couple years: local VFR loving around, mild backcountry, finish instrument rating and occasional regional trips. Unfortunately it needs a new engine at the moment, so no chance of fly-before-I-buy. All of my instructors vouch for the plane and the partner though.

Thatís awesome. drat I miss GA.

Mao Zedong Thot
Oct 16, 2008



Animal posted:

Thatís awesome. drat I miss GA.

I'll let you fly my 172 if you let me fly your 767

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Animal posted:

Thatís awesome. drat I miss GA.

I forgot what thread I was in and thought you were expressing love for Georgia.

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a patagonian cavy
Jan 12, 2009

UUA CVG 230000 KZID /RM TODAY IS THE FIRST DAY OF THE BENGALS DYNASTY

In reality, heís expressing his love for go arounds.

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