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FatCow
Apr 22, 2002
I MAP THE FUCK OUT OF PEOPLE


I'm going down the mini split road as well. They aren't very expensive and if you have the tools to replace an AC compressor in a car you likely have the tools to install a mini-split.

I haven't updated in a long time. Here's about two years worth of progress.

Here is where we left things:


Epoxied the floors with Armorpoxy. Holding up 2 years later fine. If it's going to see brake fluid spills spring for the 2 part epoxy top coat.


Insulated about 1/2 the walls and put up some drywall so I could hang cabinets/place shelves.




Finished up cabinets, plumbed the compressor into the in-wall piping. There will be pegboard all along the wall there so my mediocre drywall ability will be appropriately hidden.


Didn't do all that much for about a year after that. I built the center section of the lift 'plug' pretty quick since it was pretty non-optional. Finished up the plug finally. You can see the stains from the brake fluid, doesn't seem to have affected the epoxy, but it discolored/burned the top coat.


Wrote a check to finish the drywall because there are very few thing worse than hanging 5/8 drywall.


Painted the walls. Ceiling and some other bits need to be finished soon. That's going to wait for the fall or AC.


About how things stand today. Slowly moving things back in from the house garage where they sat to avoid the drywall mess. Have some 2x8' wall shelving on order as well as some filters/driers to see if I can get pretty dry air out of my compressor for filling tires.

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LobsterboyX
Jun 27, 2003
I want to eat my chicken.

I realized I never really thought about posting in this thread...

Taking photos of my garage is a bit difficult considering the amount of stuff that lives within it. I was combing thru my imgur and thought, I've got enough content to post in the thread!


a bit of a back story. My grandparents purchased my house in 1947 from the original owner that had lived there for 10 years. It was built in 37 on the former site of a orange orchard in the San Fernando Valley. My mom and uncle grew up here, and my cousins and I as well. In 97 my grandfather passed and my grandmother lived up until 2008 - by then I was out on my own and my mom rented out the house for a short time, then made the decision to renovate it and give it an add-on and live in it herself. She lived here until I sadly lost her in 2015, and I had to make the decision to get rid of my own home, and move in to the old family home.

with that decision came the fact that my grandfathers garage, where I learned so much about everything was now my own garage. The house I was in previously had a model t style garage that was good for nothing but storage, so moving from that to a 2 car big garage had plenty of appeal to me.

I had always stuck close to home and my life is here in LA, so I knew what I was getting in to. When I got in to my home, I opened the garage and there was a wall of stuff, no possible way for a car to fit inside.

after about a year of cleaning and 4-5 garage sales, and a massive amount of trash and donations, I was finally able to get a car in the garage. This photo from 2015 is the first time a car had been in the garage since 1999 when my grandmother gave up her car and license



the age of the garage was really personified by its fittings:



My grandfather was 110% a product of the depression era, he started as a machinist at Douglas Aircraft in 1937 at the age of 26 - by the time he was forced to retire in the late 70s, he was head of procurement, had a top secret clearance and was instrumental the company in so many ways -

held within the garage was a lot of his tools... that hadn't been pillaged by my cousins



So I started brining my stuff home







things were beginning to fill up quickly

in addition to the house, my mom also added a guest house on to the garage- leaving one wall stripped of its original tar paper and real dimension 2x4 framing - so I got some flat black paint and scenic painted the wall to look correct. I have to tell people about it, otherwise it goes unnoticed



Things were really starting to take shape:



and it felt good to start working on projects in the same way I used to with my grandpa when I was a kid.



and to be using his tools:



more and more full it got:



lighting is probably my favorite part



My collection of vintage tools grew as well, this is a 1954 DeWalt Power Shop Radial arm saw - someone had the nerve to throw this thing away! their loss... the thing works amazingly.





in addition, you can see in some of the pics, I also have 1940s craftsman band saw, drill press, bench grinder and a table saw - all matching era - the table saw was my grandfathers, everything else I found over the years.

the spot right outside of the garage door is my main work area for the other cars aside from the model a





this stuff finds me...






























some of my friends have the same problem I do...




in recent days I've been developing the area behind the garage as well, this is about an 8' x 30' space that has a thick tree canopy overhead and this cool old awning set up. - I have yet another kennedy box and some other cool storage back there - I've been finding myself working on stuff back there recently too. the ultimate goal with this area is to turn it in to the facade' of a vintage gas station but it would truly be just a storage shed/aux workshop. If there's interest I'll take some more pics of my progress back there soon.






I've got a few more tricks up my sleeve with the garage tho, I've been designing some new more period correct garage doors for awhile now, and now with all this time on my hands I want to make it happen!




LobsterboyX fucked around with this message at 06:11 on Jul 17, 2020

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Continue...

Also radial arm saws.. my grandpa used his regularly but be damned if I can think of a use for one. My sliding compound miter does 90% of everything and a table or (gasp) skillsaw does the rest.

Boaz MacPhereson
Jul 11, 2006

Day 12045 Ht10hands 180lbs
No Name
No lumps No Bumps Full life Clean
Two good eyes No Busted Limbs
Piss OK Genitals intact
Multiple scars Heals fast
O NEGATIVE HI OCTANE
UNIVERSAL DONOR
Lone Road Warrior Rundown
on the Powder Lakes V8
No guzzoline No supplies
ISOLATE PSYCHOTIC
Keep muzzled...


LBX all your stuff is just cool as hell. That OA5599 plate definitely caught my eye, though.

LobsterboyX
Jun 27, 2003
I want to eat my chicken.

slidebite posted:

Continue...

Also radial arm saws.. my grandpa used his regularly but be damned if I can think of a use for one. My sliding compound miter does 90% of everything and a table or (gasp) skillsaw does the rest.

The radial arm saw is just an older more complicated compound miter saw - this product "the power shop" was marketed as an all in 1 kind of thing - the head of it can be articulated quite a bit. the original literature has some pretty sketchy "ideas" in it including a man walking a 4x8 sheet across it with the blade faced out towards his stomach. It also shows that its highly portable sitting in the trunk of a 53 chevy - i found that funny when I tried to lift the thing by myself. I recently used the power shop for building a new fence, I had it set up in a few different ways and I found it to be pretty drat good for ripping and chopping up 4x4's


Boaz MacPhereson posted:

LBX all your stuff is just cool as hell. That OA5599 plate definitely caught my eye, though.

could you just drive this car across country for me.. Kowalski?

Boaz MacPhereson
Jul 11, 2006

Day 12045 Ht10hands 180lbs
No Name
No lumps No Bumps Full life Clean
Two good eyes No Busted Limbs
Piss OK Genitals intact
Multiple scars Heals fast
O NEGATIVE HI OCTANE
UNIVERSAL DONOR
Lone Road Warrior Rundown
on the Powder Lakes V8
No guzzoline No supplies
ISOLATE PSYCHOTIC
Keep muzzled...


LobsterboyX posted:

The radial arm saw is just an older more complicated compound miter saw - this product "the power shop" was marketed as an all in 1 kind of thing - the head of it can be articulated quite a bit. the original literature has some pretty sketchy "ideas" in it including a man walking a 4x8 sheet across it with the blade faced out towards his stomach. It also shows that its highly portable sitting in the trunk of a 53 chevy - i found that funny when I tried to lift the thing by myself. I recently used the power shop for building a new fence, I had it set up in a few different ways and I found it to be pretty drat good for ripping and chopping up 4x4's


could you just drive this car across country for me.. Kowalski?

I'll have it there by Sunday.



Edit: Seriously though, where'd you get that plate?

Boaz MacPhereson fucked around with this message at 20:51 on Jul 17, 2020

LobsterboyX
Jun 27, 2003
I want to eat my chicken.

So if you notice theres plenty of Easter egg plates in the garage - every year https://celebritymachines.com/ has a black friday sale.. and every year I seem to spend 100 or so -

MomJeans420
Mar 19, 2007

Most of the gear, most of the time


I don't get the OA5599 reference

Boaz MacPhereson
Jul 11, 2006

Day 12045 Ht10hands 180lbs
No Name
No lumps No Bumps Full life Clean
Two good eyes No Busted Limbs
Piss OK Genitals intact
Multiple scars Heals fast
O NEGATIVE HI OCTANE
UNIVERSAL DONOR
Lone Road Warrior Rundown
on the Powder Lakes V8
No guzzoline No supplies
ISOLATE PSYCHOTIC
Keep muzzled...


^^^ Vanishing Point

LobsterboyX posted:

So if you notice theres plenty of Easter egg plates in the garage - every year https://celebritymachines.com/ has a black friday sale.. and every year I seem to spend 100 or so -

Very cool. I am supremely disappointed there's no California plate 614 HSO, though.

wallaka
Jun 8, 2010

Least it wasn't a fucking red shell


MomJeans420 posted:

I don't get the OA5599 reference

The Vanishing Point Challenger.

MomJeans420
Mar 19, 2007

Most of the gear, most of the time


Nice, I actually love that movie but I haven't seen it in what must be 15 years

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011
Probation
Can't post for 5 hours!


I was led here from the house buying thread- but I am about to close on the house, and this is what the garage looks like. https://imgur.com/a/OPnS0ci

What can I do to clean all of this up? The final walk through today was the first time I saw the garage in its full, as it was full of boxes of the seller's stuff.

I'm guessing I can just fill the gap with spray foam? I'm also worried about that stain coming out of the wall in the second picture. Could that be water damage?

Digital_Jesus
Feb 10, 2011



You could probably get someone to grind/epoxy coat that for $1200-$1500 if you want it to look brand new.

Phone postin but the stains on the floor could be from moisture seeping into whatever they were storing. Anything running down the walls Id check for drips/leaks near the roof line on the wall.

Dirt on the stucco could be anything from an active water spot from somewhere down to just dirt/sediment collection over time.

Digital_Jesus fucked around with this message at 21:36 on Jul 26, 2020

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Bioshuffle posted:

I'm guessing I can just fill the gap with spray foam? I'm also worried about that stain coming out of the wall in the second picture. Could that be water damage?

Clean it out and see what remains. Spray foam would probably take care of it.

The stain looks like oil, especially how it looks like it stained the molding above it, just in the area of the spill. Not uncommon with a garage, but something to double-check. The seller probably knows.

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011
Probation
Can't post for 5 hours!


Digital_Jesus posted:

You could probably get someone to grind/epoxy coat that for $1200-$1500 if you want it to look brand new.

Phone postin but the stains on the floor could be from moisture seeping into whatever they were storing. Anything running down the walls Id check for drips/leaks near the roof line on the wall.

Dirt on the stucco could be anything from an active water spot from somewhere down to just dirt/sediment collection over time.

The walls and along the roof looked clean and free of stains. Unfortunately the seller does not speak any english and we're having some communication issues.

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



The classic Ďpretend I donít speak English so I donít have to explain the stain in the garageí gambit.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Bioshuffle posted:

I was led here from the house buying thread- but I am about to close on the house, and this is what the garage looks like. https://imgur.com/a/OPnS0ci

What can I do to clean all of this up? The final walk through today was the first time I saw the garage in its full, as it was full of boxes of the seller's stuff.

I'm guessing I can just fill the gap with spray foam? I'm also worried about that stain coming out of the wall in the second picture. Could that be water damage?

Not saying that you should expanding foam that hole (there is certainly a more correct way) but if you do get the window foam that's low expansion, much more controllable so less of a mess.

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011
Probation
Can't post for 5 hours!


Mystery solved. There is a rack on that wall where the seller hung all their tools, so I'm guessing that's where the stains are from.

If I do a half-assed job cleaning before laying on epoxy, it'll just end up peeling, right?

What would be the "correct" way to fix that hole? I think a fresh coat of paint on the walls will make a huge difference.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Bioshuffle posted:

If I do a half-assed job cleaning before laying on epoxy, it'll just end up peeling, right?

What would be the "correct" way to fix that hole? I think a fresh coat of paint on the walls will make a huge difference.

Yes. You need to grind it and use chemicals to clean it up if you want it to adhere.

The hole looks like it's in the concrete. It's a garage so I wouldn't really be too bothered by it personally and just paint it or epoxy it the same color as the rest of the floor and slab. Otherwise guess you're repairing concrete.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


Our offer was accepted on a new house so that means new garage!





That I stupidly forgot to take pictures of while we were there. But it's pretty nice with a high ceiling and decent storage options.

boxen
Feb 20, 2011


Rhyno posted:

Our offer was accepted on a new house so that means new garage!





That I stupidly forgot to take pictures of while we were there. But it's pretty nice with a high ceiling and decent storage options.

Nice! Congratulations!

I'm house shopping and either a nice workshop or room to build one is top of my priority list. Post some pics when you get it sorted.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


This thread is good and needs more posts.
I put this in the tools thread but fits better here

Hypnolobster posted:

I'm like 50 hours deep on reorganizing the garage, and I absolutely despise storing jackstands. This is far and above the best way I've ever done it so far. I made a woodgears.ca style rolling drawer/cart thing and it slips under the work bench with just a liiiitle bit of friction.

It's so goddamn good. I've thought about this for years and finally did it. I did it out of steel because I was originally trying to hit a razor thin tolerance on the height of the yellow stands vs the height of the shelf supports, but I realized that I could cut the c-channel on the bench and roll it up.
So now it's unnecessarily steel, but it's fine.





and no, those aren't recall stands.

Continuing my gently caress shelves initiative, I made a ridiculously beefy drawer. I also didn't want to spend $80-$250 on heavy duty 30" drawer slides, so I made them from some R6 bearings and steel.





Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Hypnolobster posted:

This thread is good and needs more posts.
I put this in the tools thread but fits better here


Continuing my gently caress shelves initiative, I made a ridiculously beefy drawer. I also didn't want to spend $80-$250 on heavy duty 30" drawer slides, so I made them from some R6 bearings and steel.







I'd be interested in more info on how you made the slides. Neat!

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Hypnolobster posted:

This thread is good and needs more posts.
I put this in the tools thread but fits better here


Continuing my gently caress shelves initiative, I made a ridiculously beefy drawer. I also didn't want to spend $80-$250 on heavy duty 30" drawer slides, so I made them from some R6 bearings and steel.







R6 bearing will fit a standard 3/8 bolt nicely and you've got a fuckoff strong drawer.

Another way you can do it is by using a cam follower which is basically a needle bearing with a built in threaded stud - but I like your way and would almost certainly be more economical as well.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Yeah, this is like $18 worth of bearings and a bunch of 3/8 hardware. Just using a nut as a spacer and tapped the 4" plate.

Pretty much stole the idea from seeing truck bed drawer builds on YouTube. Using steel for the plate and good centerpunch practices meant I could easily hit a few thou tolerance on the tapped holes so it has zero perceptible play vertically. Way nicer than expensive commercial slides (except that mine aren't full extension).

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at 03:08 on Aug 18, 2020

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Cross posting this, since it's more related to this thread.


We last left the compressor directly hooked to a 75' Coxreels EZ-Coil. No regulation, but a big 3/4" in/out filter.

I spent Thursday doing a ton of work, including reinforcing the guardrail, adding a cross beam, and soldering a bunch of 3/4" and 1/2" copper.
I've had a ton of trouble with the "standard" unions, which use a bubble flare-type seal. I found someone on eBay clearing out a bunch of 3/4" and 1/2" Watts union valves, which have an O-ring seal. They're high-lead, so no good for plumbing any more, but perfect for air lines.
So... the new setup adds a T after the 3/4" hydraulic flex line. One side of the T goes to the reel, still unregulated. The other goes to the main 3/4" air line. All copper is clamped/isolated with rubber-lines P-clamps.


From there, it makes a couple of turns and crosses the 6' gap to the exterior wall:


The first valve/union is part way down the wall. It was the only way to install this solo and also works great to leak-test each section. The slope is intentional, as I want any water that condenses out to flow away from the compressor and toward a future drain leg.
Over my machine shop area, the first drop is installed. It's a T off the side of the main line, then turns down the wall. There's another valve/union at the mid-way point, mostly for installation ease, but also for easy reconfiguration if needed:

The drop terminates in a 12" drain leg with 1/2" ball valve, and a 90 to a regulator/lubricator and a Dynabrade swivel:


Now I just need to source a coiled airhose, and I'll have air to clean off parts right at the machines, instead of dragging the big hose down.

More to come, that's for sure. Eventually, I'll run a line up to the ceiling off the main line, and move the other reel up there next to the power drops. I also need to replace the current pump->tank line with copper and a radiator. It's currently sporting a piece of AC line which fits, but isn't rated for the heat of the compressor pump, and will eventually blow up. I've got a temperature-controlled switch module, and plan on mounting some sort of radiator/fan setup to the pump outlet. It'll knock a lot of water out of the air before it can get to the lines, and not burn much additional power.

The next step that I'd like to take is to install a motorized ball valve, an auto drain valve, and a compressor cut-off switch. I'm planning on running conduit down the front of the lab and installing a single switch that should: A) Enable the pressure switch to turn the compressor on, B) Enable the motorized ball valve which will replace the valve between the tank and main filter, C) Enable the timer on the auto-drain valve, and D) turn on an indicator light. The issue is that legit motorized ball valves are $$. I've got a couple of saved searches on eBay, and I'm hoping to snag some surplus parts. If not, I'll probably figure out some mickey-mouse Rube Goldberg wire rope and pulley system to open/close the main valve. The last thing I want is the compressor running non-stop if something breaks and I'm not around.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


My wife's step-step sister is a personal trainer and built an incredible home gym in their garage and it's inspired us to do the same so I will likely be clearing out anything I no longer use to save room in the garage. I have like, 9 corded drills I haven't touched in ages. And probably 3 old circular saws.

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Rhyno posted:

I have like, 9 corded drills I haven't touched in ages. And probably 3 old circular saws.

... why?

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



I think they start reproducing on their own once you get a few of them together

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Maybe he's like me when my dad went through the flea market phase where he couldn't afford to NOT buy a bunch of cheap rear end tools (despite owning every tool ever already) and then just gave them to me because I didn't have one. But 100x

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


Most of it is left from my grandfather. I don't have much from him except for tools so it's been hard to part with that stuff.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


^^ I totally get that. I still have things from my grandpa that I haven't even looked at in 25+ years. Just super tough to part with.

sharkytm posted:

The next step that I'd like to take is to install a motorized ball valve, an auto drain valve, and a compressor cut-off switch. I'm planning on running conduit down the front of the lab and installing a single switch that should: A) Enable the pressure switch to turn the compressor on, B) Enable the motorized ball valve which will replace the valve between the tank and main filter, C) Enable the timer on the auto-drain valve, and D) turn on an indicator light. The issue is that legit motorized ball valves are $$. I've got a couple of saved searches on eBay, and I'm hoping to snag some surplus parts. If not, I'll probably figure out some mickey-mouse Rube Goldberg wire rope and pulley system to open/close the main valve. The last thing I want is the compressor running non-stop if something breaks and I'm not around.
Solenoid valves aren't cheap brand new, but your surplus idea isn't crazy. I'd hook you up but being I'm in and shipping is anywhere from crazy to surprise sex, probably not economical for you.

Expand your searches to Red Hat, or Asco Red Hat. They're very often used as synonyms for valves like that in industry even if they aren't. Like Xerox and Kleenex.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

slidebite posted:

^^ I totally get that. I still have things from my grandpa that I haven't even looked at in 25+ years. Just super tough to part with.

Solenoid valves aren't cheap brand new, but your surplus idea isn't crazy. I'd hook you up but being I'm in and shipping is anywhere from crazy to surprise sex, probably not economical for you.

Expand your searches to Red Hat, or Asco Red Hat. They're very often used as synonyms for valves like that in industry even if they aren't. Like Xerox and Kleenex.

I wasn't actually looking at solenoid valves. Don't they draw power any time they're on, sometimes significant amounts? I was hoping there was a motorized valve with limit switches and either spring-return or battery-return if the power gets cut. I see bunches of Chinese ones on eBay, but I don't trust them.

RIP Paul Walker
Feb 26, 2004



We have a giant switch controlling the compressor and make sure to turn it off when we leave the shop.



Iím thousands of miles away right now and canít take a picture, but thatís the basic idea. Itís in an accessible spot by the door.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

RIP Paul Walker posted:

We have a giant switch controlling the compressor and make sure to turn it off when we leave the shop.



I’m thousands of miles away right now and can’t take a picture, but that’s the basic idea. It’s in an accessible spot by the door.

I've already got a fused disconnect up by the compressor. I'm talking about a single switch with an indicator light that does a bunch of stuff. I don't use air daily, so I don't want the system leaking down between uses. I also don't want the auto drain to run when the compressor isn't being used. I just need to find the right valve for the air supply. "Actuated valve" seems to be the keyword phrase I needed. Or I'll buy a Chinese one and see how that goes.

Slidebite: I looked up Redhat ASCO valves, and they draw 16w when actuated. That's a bunch of power and heat to hold a valve open.

RIP Paul Walker
Feb 26, 2004



Ah gotcha. We have a drain valve on a timer, it dumps every few weeks. I forget the details handy sadly.

Still prolly not what youíre after tho.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

RIP Paul Walker posted:

Ah gotcha. We have a drain valve on a timer, it dumps every few weeks. I forget the details handy sadly.

Still prolly not what you’re after tho.
It's the same idea.

I'll be using an electric valve that pops for ~10 seconds every hour. The tank is not exactly new, so I really don't want water sitting for very long. Once I upgrade the inlet line to have a radiator and drain leg, it should cut down the water production.

TacoHavoc
Dec 31, 2007
It's taco-y and havoc-y...at the same time!

Have you considered something like a taco zone sentry? Hit the terminals with 24vac (or dc), supercaps charge, valve opens, then the caps trickle charge until power goes away. Then the actuator uses the stored energy to close.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Hmm, out of curiosity why is 16W? That's less than a lot of LED light bulbs (I assume we're talking 115V here).

The valves can be NC or NO (normally closed/open) for when the power isn't on to it, and it takes no power (afaik) to do that.

I agree with your term "Actuated valve" - that is indeed what it is, but, of course you'll have to specify as to the type and actuation.

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ThinkFear
Sep 14, 2007



sharkytm posted:

I've already got a fused disconnect up by the compressor. I'm talking about a single switch with an indicator light that does a bunch of stuff. I don't use air daily, so I don't want the system leaking down between uses. I also don't want the auto drain to run when the compressor isn't being used. I just need to find the right valve for the air supply. "Actuated valve" seems to be the keyword phrase I needed. Or I'll buy a Chinese one and see how that goes.

Slidebite: I looked up Redhat ASCO valves, and they draw 16w when actuated. That's a bunch of power and heat to hold a valve open.

You are talking about like $3 a year to run that valve. That said, I've used "U.S. Solid" brand valves to good effect if you really want a motorized ball valve. Cheap, work fine, and even available in stainless.

If you're interested in how to do your switching scheme: Switch w/ pilot for a receptacle in the loft for the main valve and auto drain, hang a RIB off of it to break the pressure switch to the contactor.

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