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Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



I don't have any cool pictures to show off my very standard 2 car garage. Still, I'm working on making it better and removing the poo poo tile in it and getting the floor epoxied this summer, and redoing a bit of drywall and hopefully painting it.

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Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Got the asbestos tile removed from my garage floor today. Only it wasn't everywhere in the garage and there are random concrete patches.

Before:


After:


Going to see an epoxy guy soon and see what can be done. Hopefully it's salvageable.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Ferremit posted:

If that's concrete left over then it's either a case of grind down the remnant concrete to level with the slab or fill where the tile was with self levelling cement, then coat

That's my thought. I worry that I might have problems getting things to adhere based on whatever they used to remove the mastic. I will likely farm this job out anyway so I'll see what some pros recommend.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



^ How did imgur get so poo poo so quickly? Linked pics never work for me now.

Suburban Dad fucked around with this message at 00:24 on Jul 1, 2017

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



gimpsuitjones posted:

I'm trying to work out how to use it on mobile since Photobucket now wants me to pay (gently caress paying for literally anything)

Even on their main site if I copy the link they don't show up in threads, but open fine in a new window.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Olympic Mathlete posted:

Why was the asbestos removed in the first place? If it's sealed then it's fine... I feel that taking it up would've produced a whole lot more fibres than not taking it up and possibly sealing it forever under concrete.

Because it was cracking the tiles when I used a jack and breaking up in chunks. So, yeah.

Cached Money posted:

Careful with the sanding because there might be asbestos in the adhesive they used to lay down the tiles as well.

Mastic was tested, didn't contain asbestos. Still, the epoxy and floor grinding is going to be contracted out. Should happen next week. There's still a few spots that I'm going to grind myself and try and fill (low spot by the door on one side) but either way I'll be wearing a mask and having a dust collector for the grinder.

Last night I worked on the areas where I'm seeing wet drywall (water is coming up from the floor near the front side door and on the one exterior wall, looks like between the garage slab and the blocks of the foundation around the perimeter) and trying to divert water away outside. Seems like it's wicking in the wooden baseboards and going up to the drywall so I'm debating going with a different material for them on reinstall. Any suggestions? Thought about PVC or maybe just not even reinstalling them (since the water isn't high enough to get the drywall wet, there's a 1-2" gap from the floor to the drywall) so I don't have this problem again. Already I've tried to fill in the gap between the slab and the block with a bit of cement and did other measures outside the garage so hopefully I don't have this again, but I don't want it to gently caress up my drywall again in any case.

Suburban Dad fucked around with this message at 14:15 on Jul 12, 2017

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



CommieGIR posted:

I kind of want to knock down the back wall for my garage and make it drive through



Except it would be into my den.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



How about a grate? Would have been nice when you had the slab poured to put a little lip around it that you could just drop it on. Light gets through and it could lift right off.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Just don't turn into the literal goon in the well.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Olympic Mathlete posted:

I was wondering the same but it looks like it's for driving the car onto which helps centre it a bit perhaps?

Probably raising the car up a little as well to get the lift under it since it's a tiny little MR2.


Working on my garage more this week. Putting in some new drywall, ripped out the baseboard trim and am going to go with something like this:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/ROPPE-Se...1S100/100123333

This way I can have toolboxes/workbench right up against the walls (hey man, it's a small 2 car and all that space counts!). Need to get the drywall taped and mudded then hopefully paint before epoxy guy comes next Wednesday. I also need to do a little grinding before he comes. He's going to grind the slab but as pictured earlier in the thread there are uneven patches. I want to try and smooth them out a bit and also there's a low spot near the door which allows water in that I want to fill. I bought some of this stuff from Legacy Industrial (popular on garage journal).
http://www.legacyindustrial.net/pro...rete-patch.html

Will definitely post some more pictures once I'm getting closer to completed. I'm going with a dark grey epoxy with white and black chips, so I'm thinking of painting the walls a grey/silver and do a white ceiling.



I know most of you serious garage bros are like "who gives a poo poo, where's the lift?" but it drives me crazy that I had a lovely chipping tan floor and tan walls/ceiling. Beige everywhere! I just want my garage to not have water issues and have a good floor that doesn't crack anymore. Then I'll mess with adding more lighting and electrical in there and maybe a scissor lift if I can find one that fits in the space and makes sense. I still want to be able to park 2 cars in it daily.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



This should be interesting. My epoxy guy has a 5 year warranty on his, so hopefully that doesn't happen here (Michigan).

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Got the epoxy done yesterday. Can walk on it today supposedly and park cars in there in a week. Still plenty to do before that happens with getting it painted and the drywall done. (Don't judge me for my lovely large drywall gaps, first real time doing it and none of the walls are square of course. ) I had to do a little patch work here and there on some areas before they coated it.

Why I had to do this in the first place :


There's a large seam in the concrete going down the center of the garage that I must have tried jacking over (usually bring car to the center to do any work since it's a small 2 car garage) which cracked the tile below. It started chipping up in several places because my jack has small wheels (pressure = force/area).

Before, after asbestos tile and mastic removal. Skim coats of concrete all over the place.


Grinding:




Sneak preview:

Suburban Dad fucked around with this message at 15:25 on Aug 24, 2017

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Larrymer posted:

Got the asbestos tile removed from my garage floor today. Only it wasn't everywhere in the garage and there are random concrete patches.

Before:


After:


Going to see an epoxy guy soon and see what can be done. Hopefully it's salvageable.

The layout is essentially unchanged, here's the final result.





I'm pretty happy with the final result. I'm not proud of the lovely drywall work I did and the fact that the paint is really only primer at this point (had to get everything back in there this weekend), but I keep telling myself "it's just a garage." I finally put up the white board that's been sitting for years and hung a couple flags (not pictured) on the left wall looking in. With all that poo poo in there and I can still fit in 2 cars (22x20ish I think), which pleases me.

This will be the last time it is clean and organized.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Not sure how well it would and adhere down in the low spots unless it's prepped somehow and since it's a very thin skim coat. Since I coated mine with epoxy afterward, I used this stuff to fill in the spalled/low areas which came recommended on garage journal.

http://www.legacyindustrial.net/pro...rete-patch.html

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



I would consider having a drain for the floor if you plan to wash stuff inside there. Pretty much the only time to put that in, obviously much harder after the fact. Dreese nailed about everything else I could think of. Plumbing also (if desired) is something to think about.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



I probably wouldn't bother either. I think anything 40-80 degrees is pretty comfortable to work in.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Fermented Tinal posted:

It's my shirt.

Thanks, dad

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Garage2Roadtrip posted:

Came out pretty level.


Wait for the noise...


Looks pretty good, not wasting any time either. Better than my bird poo poo welds.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Nice French-Canadian garage.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



I finally bought the big rear end tool box (reward for selling my truck, so I had to have it delivered ) I've been eyeing for a long time finally. Still transferring everything over to it, but my garage should be nearly complete. Just needs some more lighting and wiring done.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



FatCow posted:

Haven't posted an update in a while. I pretty much have a structure at this point.







I wish I could add on a garage with a lift without it looking weird, and having the space to do so.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Nice, decent amount of space. 2.5 car I assume?

I would try to hook up a faucet in there (if there's not one already) to spray down the car from winter salt. As for the lift, you might look at max jacks as well. It'll get you higher but it's probably a little harder to move around vs. the quick jack. If you leave one side in position permanently though it may be a little better lift and not that big of a deal.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



It frustrates me to no end that MLS listings and zillow both say how many garage spaces the house has, but has no filter or way to search for it effectively.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Mr. Powers posted:

Is there a standard dimension for "car with room to move around it"? Will be a good reference to have when I'm looking at listings. someone earlier said they had asked for 1k sqft, but I guess I have no mental image for size for that.

Standard 2 car is around 20x20 (400 sq ft.) +- two feet or so on either of those dimensions. You can work on a car nicely in there (assuming it's by itself), and park two in there but it's tight. Minimum to work on one car fairly comfortably I'd say is a 1.5 car garage.

1k sq ft would be a dream for most of us.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007




Yep, this is what you want. I threw it on to seal up some cracks in my driveway and it's lasted well in Michigan.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



FBS posted:

I finally got rid of the spare washer/dryer clogging up my one-car apartment garage and I'm looking for tips on a small workbench for general garage stuff.

I've got four feet or so of width for a dedicated work surface and I don't want to spend a huge amount of money, and I'd like something I can move to a two-car garage eventually without it feeling worthless. Let me know what to look for please

I built this. I'm a terrible carpenter and it's solid as hell. You can adjust to your space.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/work...imple-50-bench/

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



My vise is mounted to the bench I linked above. No issues wrenching on it but it has a ton of fluids and poo poo on the shelves so it has some additional heft.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Heh, only half my workbench is cluttered with poo poo. Good nuff

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



^ Nice. Progress is progress.

Looking into adding on a 3rd bay to our standard 2 car attached garage. Need to talk to contractors to see if this is actually possible with our property/zoning and also, financially. Time to get reading and get some quotes. I wonder if it can be made to look decent since on that side there's a 2nd story above the garage which we won't be building that high (unless I want gently caress you attic storage space and room for possible future lift...might be nice actually).

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Best pic I have on hand while at work...from selling a previous car and doing the photo shoot. And a dated one from the county web site at least showing the truss direction. I think there's plenty of room to put it in, just hard to visualize it not looking terrible.



Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Bedroom above, and there's a den on the "back" of the garage so extending back isn't really an option.

The same roof slope with brick front is probably best aesthetically, I'd agree.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



There's a balcony off the master in the back that we never use, and a walk out patio under that.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



LloydDobler posted:

Super quick and dirty, but if you did a lower level at the same angle roof I think it'd look fine. Make it as tall or short as you need.



Thanks for this. We're having somebody stop by next week to have a look and see what options are. I think that could work if it was raised a little higher. I think I'll future proof myself for a lift even though I sort of hate cars at the moment. Doesn't stop me from working on the dailies and such though.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Suburban Dad posted:

Thanks for this. We're having somebody stop by next week to have a look and see what options are. I think that could work if it was raised a little higher. I think I'll future proof myself for a lift even though I sort of hate cars at the moment. Doesn't stop me from working on the dailies and such though.

So contractor has been selected, he's coming by today for deposit to start drawings and all that. Plan is to do a 12' wide bay that's the depth of the house (35'), assuming the city is ok with the massive depth/sq footage. Widening by another 3' was another $4500 or so so we'll probably keep it at 12' wide. Plan is to have another parking bay with storage in the back for tools and other crap that our tiny basement won't cover. It'll basically look like what Lloyd drew up, with the roof starting at the base of the 2nd story windows for maximum height. Here's the list of what he's quoting so far.

-Supply final design and blueprints for proposed garage
-Break out walkway next to existing garage and slab in front of new garage area and haul
-Dig and pour 12"x 42" footings for 12'x 35' attached garage
-Haul dirt
-Install (1) layer of block on footings
-Form new garage floor and approx.12'x 20' apron in front
-Install crushed gravel base and tamp
-Pour new 4" floor and apron with 6 bag mix
-Build 12'x 35' attached garage with shed roof
-Take down brick on east side of garage
-Match wall height of existing garage
-12" overhangs on eave and front gable
-Frame for 8'x 7' overhead door
-Cut in archway to existing garage
-Install 36" service door on rear wall of addition
-Install shingles to match house
-Install brick in front wall of garage up to eave using leftover brick
-Install vinyl soffit on overhangs; aluminum trim on rakes, eaves and doors
-Install Mastic Board & Batten vertical siding on walls and gables
-Install gutters and downspouts
-Upgrade electrical service to 30 circuit, 100 amp panel
-Run 60 amp panel to garage with basic wiring package
-Install 8'x 7' overhead door with opener to match existing as closely as possible

Anything else I should be thinking about or considering right now? Concrete 4" thick should be good for a lift in the future (?), but I'll check on ceiling height since I don't know what the trusses will look like with a "shed" style roof. Honestly a max jack is probably best case scenario at this point I'd guess.

I'm going to talk to him about insulating and drywall and expand on what the electrical "package" means. Obviously need to know what's planned there before drywall. Currently we have a big window on the exterior side of the existing garage that we're planning on turning into a big opening (no door planned) to the new garage, so makes sense to insulate it even though there's not going to be any HVAC to either garage. Also window on the room behind existing garage will be turned into a door most likely for another access point from inside the house.

Suburban Dad fucked around with this message at 14:39 on Jul 9, 2019

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



meatpimp posted:

Is he handling permits and inspections? Some areas are tight on that, others don't care. I walled up a loft to make a bedroom and I had to give plans, have a rough inspection and a final inspection to keep everything "on the books," all for 2 partition walls, a closet and a couple outlets.

Also, spray foam insulation on everything.

Yes, they're doing permits and all that as well.

I've done a few pieces of fiberglass before and while it's itchy and kind of sucks, it's not too hard. I'm debating if I let them leave it bare and do the insulation and drywall myself eventually. That leaves electrical options open in case we don't want to spend as much up front since already this is a big expense. However, I am a terrible carpenter and it will look much shittier if I do this.

Is the R value better with spray? Sounds potentially easier but possibly messier to do but costs more from my 5 seconds of searching.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



meatpimp posted:

Spray foam has comparable R value to fiberglass, in general, but it also performs better as an air barrier, since it's sealing all the nooks and cracks. It's the one thing I really wish I had in a 20 year old house, just for the energy savings and the air sealing. All the little holes and gaps add up, and the spray foam is a 1-stop fix for all the stuffs.

Fair enough. My house was built in the early 60s and has old windows, it's drafty as gently caress. I wonder how much insulation will really help on this addition that has no HVAC and is surrounded by exterior walls on 3 sides anyway. We're planning to maybe put another fridge out there (basement is probably the better idea once the electrical is dealt with) so it'll probably have a wide range of temps out there.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



slidebite posted:

4" @ 3000 PSI is pretty much the minimum for a lift. Not sure what "6 bag mix" is. If you are planing on a lift, an extra inch or so of thickness would not be a bad idea and get that ceiling as high as you reasonably can. RE: The electrical, if they wire it make sure you have outlets every 6-8' and lights. Lots of lights. Not sure where you live, but heat isn't important?

And yeah, spray foam is the bees knees. That sets apart the spec/mass builders in my area from the craftsman builders. They'll use batt insulation in the walls but spray in all the crawl spaces/inside the soffits/draft/tough areas.

Thanks, good questions I'll forward along.

E: As for heat, it's attached to the house and current garage is insulated. I can work out there in a long sleeve shirt in the winter comfortably. Doesn't get below around 50ish from what I've seen. Now the new one will add more unheated space and will probably drop that, but I could always add on a heater later. Honestly I've sort of moved on from car work/project cars too much anymore so the heat would only really be a concern for things that we're storing in there when the time comes.

Suburban Dad fucked around with this message at 12:43 on Jul 10, 2019

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007




So I talked to the architect about the roof and rafters, and it sounds like there won't really need to be a truss/beams going across the ceiling and I can have the roof be the ceiling if I want, or they can make it flat. I'm trying to think of future additional storage and also bonus roof height for lift, etc. so I may go this route and leave it open. Makes it more expensive to insulate (spray foam) if I decide to do that. So many decisions.

It's getting drawn up now and sounds like they should start on it within a few weeks, and estimate 3-4 weeks to complete it.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



IOwnCalculus posted:

I think it ranks a nice round zero on wife approval factor, but... agreed.

Heh. Great for bachelors.

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Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Tremek posted:

Iím talking to our builder engineer and architect this week and I need some suggestions for what good poo poo I should ask to incorporate into my garage rebuild.

Is there some wiring standards or good-practices re: plug and line placement on walls should I suggest or ask about? What about pre-wiring for electric car charging station and welder?

What sort of pad/foundation will I need on the slab to support a lift?

How should I ask to have it insulated?

Currently leaning toward a slab plus a metal-frame unsupported steel building core, probably tall enough to allow for a second story loft over one portion, thinking a 40x60 or 40x72 footprint (one fabricator told is a truss is required every 12 feet) and then 2-4 overhead doors, at least some oversized. Not sure if this will be attached or detached but we will also use the siding and roof materials of the house.

Also thinking to have it plumbed for a sink and toilet/urinal. Also maybe some form of heated pad tech (water/antifreeze? Combine with solar or geothermal?)

Any thoughts on cooling in summer - Big rear end fan or something, or potentially AC, or both?

Open to any and all suggestions or clarifications.

I looked into some of this when I was looking to add on. I think you'll want around 4" thick minimum for the slab and 3-4kpsi concrete. Look at a couple lifts you're interested in to get a general idea for what they require. As for the electric for an EV, https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...6#post497878673

Most folks said 50amp would be good nuff.

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