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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Mr. Powers posted:

How little would you trust a garage with a wood floor that has a basement under it? My gut says I shouldn't trust it.

Depends on the structure and flooring. There is a commercial garage in town that is in an old enough building to have wooden plank floors in their 3 bays at street level with another set of bays under them accessible from the back. It's all been working just fin since the mid 1900s.

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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

That doesn't sound promising.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Dude....that is absolutely "special" under there. That's built right.

Nice house and nice property.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Mr. Powers posted:

It's all one basement under the house and extending under the garage. I didn't think it looked flimsy or anything, but two cars are pretty heavy and it looks like what I would expect to see in a basement rather than something... more, I guess.

That is not typical basement lally columns nor joists. I'm not saying this is a structural engineering analysis based on a real estate listing, but that is significantly more than what you would typically see. It's enough to pass a sniff test of "if I'm really interested in this house I'll have the inspector bring in a structural engineer for this particular purpose."

Also echoing $$ for kitchen modernization, but that looks completely serviceable as is.

Motronic fucked around with this message at 05:14 on Aug 17, 2019

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Mr. Powers posted:

the bottom of the joists are below 6' of clearance

Oofff...hard no. That's just an annoying space to be in. It's worse than having a crawl space because you WILL end up using it for something or other and walking around with your head tilted to the side the entire time you're down there. My old place was like that.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

angryrobots posted:

OMFG those shelves are awesome

Seriously, what a great haul.

Most of my friends who have gotten great poo poo like that was because they were in the right place at the right time when some shop or store closed down. One of them has his garage ringed in shelving from a closed down CVS and drat commercial shelving is sturdy. And a lot of it is very configurable.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Powershift posted:

Yeah, this i just happened to check the free section on kijiji 10 minutes after it was posted, said i could be anywhere in town in 15 minutes, and when i showed up said i would take everything and the dude just kept showing me cooler and cooler stuff.

Yeah, dream scenario. Dude was just done and wanted his space back/wanted his wife to stop complaining that she can't park in the garage anymore. You done good.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Pr0kjayhawk posted:

A quick interweb search recommended against smoke detectors but in favor of heat detectors.

Yes, smokes are bad in a dusty environment. They will false alarm constantly.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

The Royal Nonesuch posted:

Alright, this is kind of an open-ended question but I'm looking for general input on two-post lifts........they'd be able to store one vehicle up top and one underneath

That's not really a good storage solution. Typically one would use a 4 post for storage.

The Royal Nonesuch posted:

Does a lift require any special foundation elements or changes?

Yes. It depends on the lift and max weight, but you're typically going to need thicker/higher PSI concrete than one would normally pour for a residential garage floor.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

The Royal Nonesuch posted:

The 4-posts I'm seeing in cursory googling are all ramp-types where the car sits on the tires. That's great for storage, fine for oil changes and whatnot, but a big part of why I want a lift is for ease of rotating tires and suspension work (i.e. I'll be installing lifts for a couple of my 4x4 friends in the near future). I suppose it's easy enough to bust out the jackstands for that, but is there a best of both worlds option? Overhead vehicle storage would be nice, but currently it is not a high priority.

Yes, this is the trade off. Look at gantry jacks. They go between the ramps and let you lift the car off of them. It's not cheap, but it's a small space storage/suspension work solution.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Rhyno posted:

So what do you guys think about steel construction for a free standing garage? Seems to be a much cheaper option and it mostly bolts together.

Steel is good, but if you're in an area where it's common pole construction can be even cheaper. I've got a buddy out my way shopping comparisons on this right now.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

frrtbkr posted:

Iím excited! I made an offer that the seller accepted for this beauty:


That garage is awesome and you get to be REAL smug with your property insurance company about the "how far away is the closest hydrant" question.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

meatpimp posted:

Edit 2: This company services NE Indiana and offers epoxy slurry. That's what you want if you can afford it. It's a layer of epoxy mixed with aggregate about 1/8-1/4" thick, or more. It's bombproof.

That's what we put in the bays of the fire house. It's well over 20 years old at the main station. All you need is a pressure washer to make it look brand new again.

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Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Hypnolobster posted:

It did occur to me that it'd be easy to remove the locking pawl from an inexpensive retracting cord reel, mount it high on the wall next to the door and make a little bracket that brings the cord down to the bottom corner of the garage door. It'd be really nice to just use low profile LED lights (like the Costco Feit shop lights).

There are cord reels used for a similar purpose on a lot of commercial doors. Often you'll find one just for the "bump strip" since most commercial doors don't have optical sensors. But I've seen them that have enough leads for the bump strip and lights or whatever else.

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