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LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

If the door is already working smoothly and can be opened and closed by hand easily, then installing an opener is a piece of cake. I've done several for myself and friends. There are a couple weird scenarios where it's hard to install but most construction takes an opener into consideration when building.

Just remember all the force (which really shouldn't be much) is taken at the header of the garage door, the motor box really just hangs from the ceiling.

Or if you want to be a super cool guy get a shaft drive opener:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wlssvr9irfQ

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LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

NumbersMatching320 posted:

Find a bar that's renovating or closing and snag a couple old barstools is what I'd do. That or IKEA-spec.

So I've got a drill press in my attached now and chips are becoming an issue. Despite my efforts to wear covvies and use a dedicated pair of shop shoes they're still tracking into the house en masse. Any tips for controlling this other than put a magnet on it somewhere and be less of a slob?

A broom is all you need. Be diligent about cleanup, don't just leave that poo poo around, it's destructive. Shop vac is faster than broom. Our guys who hate cleanup rigged a shop vac holder so the hose is right there next to the drill and sucks up the chips as they're made.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Someone gave me a solid core door and I've used it as a workbench for decades. It's just sitting on cinder blocks now but I really need to get some 4x4 legs for it so it's solid, which would open up more storage space under it as well. Then I could mount a vise to it.

I wish I was motivated.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Super quick and dirty, but if you did a lower level at the same angle roof I think it'd look fine. Make it as tall or short as you need.

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LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

If your car roof rails will hold the box full of stuff, a garage roof stud will hold it empty no problem. I'd think you wouldn't even need a compound pulley, just a rope through a single wheel that you wrap around a cleat to tie it off. Some thin loop lifting straps to lift it and you're good.

Walk the rope and pulley aisle at home depot and see what's up. Also youtube.

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 09:01 on Sep 17, 2019

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

GIVE ME IT.

You could split that 2 or 3 ways with some buddies and have an amazing situation for the money.

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 20:36 on Sep 25, 2019

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

With sound you either absorb it (foam, fluff), block it (mass), or bounce it. (hard surfaces, angles)

Also make sure your kid is a light sleeper. I walked on eggshells around my daughter, watching movies with headphones and poo poo like that for about 8 years before learning that she can sleep through anything, including a hard as hell thunderstorm right above our house.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

In my dream garage there is a 4 socket outlet every 6 feet or so, and not down on the ground. In my current garage a previous owner put the outlets about 4-5 feet off the floor and it works out really well when you pile poo poo up around the perimeter of the room. I can reach through a shelf and find the outlet pretty easily.

Then a row of outlets along the wall above the workbench. That or an industrial grade power strip that's hard wired. Again, I had a work lab once that had an outlet strip at each workbench that was an outlet every 6 inches, 4-6 feet long. No matter where you were on the bench you could plug in 2-3 things where you needed them. And if you had something set up, you didn't have to break it down to do something else next to it.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Yeah, but what are the odds of that happening twice?

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

toplitzin posted:

Have you read the chat threads this year?

Fair point, of course. hehehe.

I've gotten to where I never leave anything even charging when I leave the house these days. Let alone a washer or dryer running. I was home when my last washer seized and caught on fire. Scared the poo poo out of me. Fortunately it made horrible noise so I came running, and all I had to do was unplug it and wait for smoke to clear.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Beach Bum posted:

What should I get for my first air tool? I've already got a Craftsman 18v 1/2" impact, so I don't need that sort of thing, but maybe something like a grinder/cutoff wheel? Air hammer/chisel? It's only a 6-gal tank, so it can't be anything too spicy, but I'm excited.

Yeah not sure what you're planning to do with that but all it'll really be good for is filling tires and drying things like you said. I have a 25 gallon craftsman and trying to knock one stuck nut loose with an air impact will drain it about halfway before the nut is loose. I usually have to charge 2-3 times to get a stubborn crank pulley nut off. And I tried using an air saw designed for windshield removal and I could cut about 2 feet of the urethane before running out of air. took me 3 fills to get halfway around the glass, then I broke it as expected. Electric is the way to go for tools now anyway.

I do love being able to fill my tires at home though, it's just really convenient.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Gorson posted:

This is art!

I'm looking for some thick, tough, textured rubber for the top of my tool box. I've seen this stuff on the tops of higher end tool boxes, it's nearly a half inch thick and has ridges like Ruffles chips. Menards and Amazon sells rolls of thinner stuff that is meant to line the drawers, that is too thin and deforms too easily. The stuff I'm thinking of would be more like the tough rubber in a truck bedliner. Anyone got a source?

https://www.americanfloormats.com/c...er-runner-mats/

We use some of this in 1/8" for bench tops at my work, it's actually meant for floor material. Decently tough, gets ugly pretty quick if you drag parts across it but still protects the top. Gotta vacuum it on the regular, it doesn't really brush off except in one direction.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

The cool part about 4 posts is that many of them don't even need to be attached to the floor. So they have accessory caster jacks that you can use to move it around or even out of the garage if you need to for whatever reason. If my ceiling was 2 ft taller I'd already have one so I could fit all 3 cars in the garage.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Most of the 4 post lifts I've seen have accessory jacks on a cross beam that allow you to get the tires off the treads. They are intended to allow you to do brakes and such. It's not quite as convenient as a 2 post but works well enough for a hobbyist.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Suburban Dad posted:

I've got 2 of 'em for storing winter tires. They're great and fold up when not in use.

Silly but serious question, are they ever really not in use? I have a tire storage shelf and it's either got my summer tires or my winter tires on it. Basically the folding seems like one of those features that helps sell the product but is actually never used. One on rails with a winch would be a way better option for me, I almost threw my back out hoisting the tires over my head last time I did it.

drat that gives me an idea.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Beach Bum posted:

Me too: Wall mounted winch setup that lifts a set of wheels on a center bore bar?

Basically. I was thinking take the standard tire holder design and put it on strut channel screwed to the wall. They sell bearing carriers that roll in them off the shelf. Then you just winch or hoist it up.

NitroSpazzz posted:

How big of wheels/tires are you guys bitching about lifting here? All my stuff is 13-15" wheels so they're light. I can see worrying about lifting some massive wheels but otherwise wtf?

Full size european cars? Right around 50 lb each. 18" x 8" wheels with tires.

Pryor on Fire posted:

I have no space in this 80% empty two car garage for my subcompact, so I'm gonna make sure I injure my back in the most spectacular way possible by storing wheels overhead.

You guys must be in your 20s, just give it a few years.

I'm 48, kid.

TrueChaos posted:

and would rather have the floor space

Exactly. My tire shelf is 6' 4 off the ground, so if I just pick the tire up and overhead press it, I get the edge on the shelf and then just shove. It's not too bad on a ladder. But I tried it without the ladder once and that's when I was a little uncomfortable when done.

But yeah I have too many spare parts (which I'll never use and should get rid of) so there is very little room in my garage, certainly not enough for a stack of tires. They're packed around the perimeter so I still have room to park 2 cars in there. I suppose under a bench would work best for tires but that's where I put really heavy poo poo like axles and transmissions for future projects.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

I think I've just realized that the reason I have a shitload of miscellaneous screws and fasteners is that I never use screws and fasteners. I probably should just get in the habit of recycling what I don't use at the end of each project, because I only do about one project a year anyway. It's not expensive to buy a box of screws if I need them.

poo poo, I'm sitting on a box of square drive subfloor screws from remodeling my bathroom 13 years ago. I really don't need those taking up space in my brain or my garage. Definitely time for a garage purge.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

meatpimp posted:

Gfci is typically for damp locations, is something driving that need? Or would this work? https://www.gordonelectricsupply.co...WhoCrC0QAvD_BwE

That's exactly what I was going to suggest.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

I would highly recommend hiring a pro to come put them in. It's not that expensive, like $100 or less, and they'll do a full tune-up/adjustment on all of it. They absolutely can kill you.

The luckiest guy I knew on that subject was the building maintenance guy at my first job. One of those Jack of all trades, Master of none types. He was doing the springs on one of our truck bay doors, a 12 footer, up on a ladder. The bar popped out of the hole and smacked him in the head. He fell all the way down on to concrete, somehow came to work the next day with nothing more than a limp and a bad shiner. And advice to not gently caress with garage door springs.

I also don't have the balls to impact gun struts apart without compressors, even though I've seen it on youtube a dozen times.

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 20:33 on Apr 7, 2020

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

I'm thinking maybe it's time to invent a tool that does it without the danger. Or just a new collar. I mean, the concept of a releasable ratchet has been around forever, why do they have these lovely setscrew locked collars that can kill you in the 21st century? Meh, given the number of installs, a tool is probably the right way to go. Something that locks in to the standard collar and allows you to safely release and wind it under power.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Heh. This is exactly what I was inventing as I typed my previous post:

https://www.northshorecommercialdoo...ing-system.html

And it's discontinued, people prefer the suicide bars apparently.

I was also imagining this, better idea: http://winderer.com/ Priced around where I'd expect to find it too, $695.00

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 20:41 on Apr 8, 2020

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

That's insane, I'm super jealous. Are they roomy inside or fairly tight with a car in there? Might want to keep 3 for yourself, like a double for the car being worked on and a single for the runner. I guess I'm assuming you already have 2 cars.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

I don't know about him, but I installed it in mine, and it's perfect for stuff you only need once in a while. Otherwise it's up and out of the way. I store my valuable but seldom used spare parts up there. Perfect example, I have all 4 window regulators from my crashed C70 that only have 65k miles on them. They cost a fortune new and junkyard units are all trash now. I don't need them now but if I ever do I'll be super glad to have them. I also have a spare trunk lid, fender, and convertible top up there. I do need to clear it out though, I have old speaker enclosures and other not-really-useful things hogging the space too. I bought a $60 tile saw when I remodeled my bathroom 14 years ago and it's just sitting up there taking up space, for the time spent holding it I could just replace it if I ever need one again. Same with the cheap brad nailer.

Even with the 8 foot ceiling, if you do a metal one and install it at like 6'4", or however high you need so you don't hit your head on it, you'll still have 18" or more of storage, perfect for those seldom used tools or parts.

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 14:44 on Apr 20, 2020

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

It took me a minute, the center section rotates. See the triangle below? Table saw on one side, chop saw on the other. I assume the left and right top panels come out during rotating.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

rscott posted:

I've been browsing through various rental sites lately, looking to downsize and cut some expenses since the economy is kind of screwed right now, and then I see this



The want is very very real. Wouldn't even be a longer commute to work.

Yeah the only thing wrong with that is it's a rental. I want to own something very similar.

But I never will, I just signed closing documents co-signing on my dad's house. He's going to continue to pay the mortgage until I move in with him and sell my place, then I'll make a down payment with my profit and take over the mortgage. He'll either pay me rent, or give me a good enough deal on the purchase that he'll just live there for free.

The best part is it's a 2300 sq foot house on the same size daylight basement. The basement is divided between a 4 car garage and a basement apartment for rent, which I might shrink or eliminate for more car storage, or remove and put in a rec room. Then in the backyard there's paved parking for 4-5 more cars. Long term goal is to put a shop in the backyard, there's entirely too much vegetation back there right now.

When I move later this year I'll be doing a megapost about it.

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 13:06 on Jun 20, 2020

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

That's great, and I want it. Never occurred to me. And yeah, the cheap LED strips you can get off Amazon or superbrightleds are surprisingly bright and very affordable these days. You could use insulated staples for a wood door but double stick tape is really effective these days. You don't even have to do one row per segment, you could just do a whole bunch of lights on the segment of your choice.

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 15:57 on Jun 22, 2020

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LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Man, clearing out a garage for moving is a huge motivator to change habits. I had so many scrap car parts saved for whatever reason, just because they might fail, maybe, someday, and I could use it. But the kinds of things I was saving aren't the kinds of things that fail, and even if they do they're the kinds of things you want new anyway. Cam sensors, serpentine tensioners, plastic trim, plastic intake parts, etc. And so much of it is stuff that I'd never realize I had, and would buy new if it failed, or hit up a junkyard. Like trunk gas springs or wiper arms. I found wiper arms for my convertible. I have 3 dipsticks, one new in the bag.

I'm recycling a shitload of it simply because I'm out of room in my moving container. But the amount of work I'm doing to get rid of them now, and the space I would have gained if I just never saved them in the first place... I really don't want a cluttered up garage anymore. There's more value to me in a clean (and cleanable) work space than in piles of parts.

Which leads to the next part, cleaning. With so much crap jammed in to every crevice, you have to move all of it to clean. So it never happens. The dirt build up under things that I could move is bad enough, but the things that are heavy and awkward and stacked 3 deep are worse.

Another thing is the lovely storage. I had about 30 spray cans of old paint in a file cabinet. Fortunately the local Sherwin Williams store recycles old paint. I have an old lovely bookshelf filled with old clothes to use as shop rags. I threw out about half of them and still have more than I'll ever use unless I use them once and toss them after each job, which I maybe should do. The garage was crowded just for stuff that I used once and had some left.

I also hate the amount of nuts and bolts I have. It's flat out ridiculous. Fortunately they're compact, but it's still about 3 small boxes full. I had dreams of sorting them by size but what a huge waste of time.

The garage I'm moving in to could possibly be the last one. It's still going to be a working garage, so I need to change some habits. Starting with not storing things for decades.

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